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" FOR the principal aim of society is to protect individuals in the enjoyment of those absolute rights, which were vested in them by the immutable laws of nature ; but which could not be preserved in peace without that mutual assistance and intercourse... "
Debates on the Resolutions and Bill for the Abolition of Slavery in the ... - Seite 313
von Great Britain. Parliament, 1833 - 1834 - 964 Seiten
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The Cloaking of Power: Montesquieu, Blackstone, and the Rise of Judicial ...

Paul O. Carrese - 2010 - 349 Seiten
...powers, so as to secure both political and civil liberty. The opening analysis of rights declares that "the principal aim of society is to protect individuals...were vested in them by the immutable laws of nature" (1.1, *124). Since natural rights were not self-executing and required the historical act of forming...
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Law Without Nations?: Why Constitutional Government Requires Sovereign States

Jeremy A. Rabkin - 2005 - 350 Seiten
...uncontrolled authority, in which ... the rights of sovereignty reside." 68 Yet he also affirms that "the principal aim of society is to protect individuals...were vested in them by the immutable laws of nature": these "absolute rights" are "life, liberty and property."" Blackstone does not regard the claim of...
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The British and Their Laws in the Eighteenth Century

David Lemmings - 2005 - 260 Seiten
...is intitled to enjoy whether out of society or in it'. Echoing Locke, he said the aim of society was 'to protect individuals in the enjoyment of those...were vested in them by the immutable laws of nature', and 'which in themselves are few and simple'. By contrast, rights which were 'social and relative result...
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Reading the Early Republic

Robert A. FERGUSON, Robert A Ferguson - 2009 - 370 Seiten
...accepting what critics now call "a preinterpretive concept of law."83 As he put the matter himself, "the principal aim of society is to protect individuals...were vested in them by the immutable laws of nature. . . . Hence it follows, that the first and primary end of human laws is to maintain and regulate these...
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Alexander Hamilton: America's Forgotten Founder

Joseph A. Murray - 2007 - 253 Seiten
...Refuted. Hamilton examined the fundamental purpose for human laws and cited Blackstone, who reasoned, "The principal aim of society is to protect individuals,...them by the immutable laws of nature; but which could not be preserved, in peace, without that mutual assistance, and intercourse, which is gained by the...
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Classics of American Political and Constitutional Thought: Origins through ...

Scott J. Hammond, Kevin R. Hardwick, Howard Leslie Lubert - 2007 - 1193 Seiten
...gives every man a right to his personal liberty; and can, therefore, confer no obligation to obedience. urts must declare the sense of the law; and if they...would equally be the substitution of their pleasu not be preserved, in peace, without that mutual assistance, and intercourse, which is gained by the...
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Reason, Faith, and Politics: Essays in Honor of Werner J. Dannhauser

Arthur M. Melzer, Robert P. Kraynak - 2008 - 227 Seiten
...(IV, iv: 49). Yet the same Blackstone confidently asserts, at the outset of the Commentaries, that "the principal aim of society is to protect individuals...were vested in them by the immutable laws of nature" (I, i: 120). That might seem highly enlightened — except for the earlier assurance that the "doctrines...
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International Law in Historical Perspective, Band 5

Jan H. Verzijl - 1972 - 518 Seiten
...the Laws of England (14th ed. by Eduard Christian Esq., London, 1803, Book I, pp. 124 and 125): For the principal aim of society is to protect individuals...them by the immutable laws of nature; but which could not be preserved in peace without that mutual assistance and intercourse, which is gained by the institution...
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