Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

RECORD OF THE LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE

CONDUCTED BY THE LINGUISTIC SOCIETY OF AMERICA
SECOND SESSION, JULY 8 TO AUGUST 16, 1929

DIRECTOR, E. H. STURTEVANT

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

20

REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE ON A LINGUISTIC Atlas OF TIE UNITED States

AND CANADA, BY Hans KURATH. PREPARATIONS FOR THE CONFERENCE..

20 MEMBERS OF THE CONFERENCE.

20 THE FIRST SESSION..

22 THE EFFECT OF MOVEMENTS OF POPULATION UPON AMERICAN DIALECTS, BY G. M. STEPHENSON (ABSTRACT)......

22 DiscusSION OF STEPHENSON'S ADDRESS (ABSTRACT)..

24 THE MECHANICAL RECORDING OF SPEECH, BY G. 0. RUSSELL (ABSTRACT).....

26 DiscuSSION OF RUSSELL'S ADDRESS (ABSTRACT)

28 THE SECOND SESSION..

30 THE THIRD SESSION.

41

[ocr errors]

RECORD OF THE LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE 1929

THE HISTORY OF THE SECOND SESSION

The History of the First Session of the LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE was given in the Record of the Linguistic Institute 1928, published as Bulletin No. 2 of the LINGUISTIC SOCIETY OF AMERICA.

Acting upon the authorization of the Executive Committee of the LINGUISTIC SOCIETY, the Director of the LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE proceeded in September 1928 to organize the session of 1929. He secured from the authorities of Yale University the same hospitable treatment which had been received for the first session, with the addition of an appropriation of $500 toward salaries of instructors in the Institute, and an additional $500 to cover the library fees of members of the Institute and the cost of books purchased by the Yale Library for the use of the Institute. He brought also before the American Council of Learned Societies the question of a possible subvention for the second session, and with the support of the Council he received from the Carnegie Corporation of New York a subvention of $4000, granted at a meeting in December 1928. He secured the participation of a strong faculty, of whom about one half had taken part in the First Session.

The Director presented a report upon the LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE 1928 to the annual business session of the LINGUISTIC SOCIETY OF AMERICA, held at New York on December 29, 1928, and his report was received and accepted. The Society then confirmed the action of the Executive Committee in authorizing a second session of the LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE, and gave to the Executive Committee power to authorize a third session if that should seem desirable.

Late in January, the Announcement of the Linguistic Institute 1929 was sent to the printer, and the finished copies were received for distribution late in February. This Announcement is obtainable as Bulletin No. 3 of the LINGUISTIC SOCIETY OF AMERICA. The Announcement was widely distributed to members of societies interested in linguistic subjects, and the Director and other members of the Administrative Committee prepared articles for appearance in technical journals, and made addresses before meetings of societies during the spring months, that the nature and purposes of the Institute might become known to all persons likely to be interested.

Early in April word was received that the local chapter of Sigma Epsilon Pi, the honorary fraternity for encouraging the study of German, at the College of the City of New York, had established two fellowships of $100 each for graduate students at the LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE, these fellowships being designated as the von Klenze Scholarships, in honor of Professor Camillo von Klenze. The holders of these fellowships for the session of 1929 were Harry I. Rothman and L. Leo Taub. The von Klenze Fellowships are to be continued annually during the life of the LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE.

Soon after the distribution of the Announcement of the session, Professor Esper fell ill and was obliged to withdraw from participation. At about the same time Professor Russell suggested that courses be instituted for teachers of the deaf, inasmuch as very few, if any, courses of a truly scientific nature are now conducted for their benefit. After some correspondence, two additional instructors were secured, Professor Metfessel and Dr. Einarsson, and additional courses were arranged. A special announcement was sent out to all the schools for the deaf, listing the following courses; the full description of the new courses is here given:

Speech Articulation. MR. RUSSELL.-A detailed study of mouth and tongue positions required for the production of each individual sound as shown by X-ray photographs and other recent experiments. An examination of the radical modifications which must be made in the traditional classifications and descriptions to conform to the facts shown by the X-ray. Practice in the reconstruction with modeling clay of these exact tongue and other vocal organ positions. Drill in methods of teaching the student how to produce each sound; and in processes of utilizing one established articulation habit to train another; also how to prevent already acquired bad habits from interfering with the formation of the requisite new ones which are to take their place.

Auricular Training; Correction of Speech and Voice Quality Defects. MR. RUSSELL.-Consideration of the auricular, speech, and brain physiology involved. Training the hearing of deaf children. Eliminating monotonous voices. Teaching pitch perception and reproduction as manifest in singing and speech intonation (quite apart from stress and quantity); and showing how it has been effectively accomplished in children with even so little as 25 per cent residuum of hearing. Study of various types of apparatus which may be used. Instruction in the use of the same. The sound patterns to be used. Practice in the testing of hearing by means of the Western Electric Audiometers. A study of the various speech and voice quality defects, their cause and correction. The phonopharyngoscope and other such recently developed instruments will make it possible for members of the class to see the vocal cords operate, and to study the lower throat and interior larynx of subjects, that all may see exactly what causes gutturality, strident or piercing voices, so-called nasal twang, etc. Lisping, stuttering, foreign brogue, unclear speech, and other like defects will also be considered.

History of English Pronunciation. MR. MALONE.-A systematic study of the history of English pronunciation and of the changes which have taken place, from the Middle English period to the present day. Consideration of the possible causes of variations, and of some of the modern variants which have their roots in past differences.

Historical Syntax of the English Language. MR. CURME.
Psychology of Language. MR. METFESSEL.
Sociological Study of Language; a seminar. MR. SALESKI.
American Pronunciation. MR. KURATH.

The following changes also were made in the instructors of courses previously announced:

Experimental Phonetics. MR. METFESSEL.
Old Norse. MR. EINARSSON.

Very shortly before the opening of the session, Professor Collitz found that he would be unable to come to New Haven, and his course in Comparative Germanic Grammar was therefore withdrawn.

The second session of the LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE ran from July 8 to August 16. Registration of students began on July 5 and continued for several days after the formal opening. On the evening of July 6 a meeting of the Faculty was held, confirming the regulations of the previous year. There was the important difference, however, that in 1929 students paid one fee of $75.00, including the Institute fee of $20.00, and were free then to take as many courses as they wished. Instructors were exempt from the Institute fee and received the privilege of attending courses for $25.00. This change in the system of fees made it more difficult to determine the membership of the separate classes, but all those who are recorded in the list at the conclusion of this RECORD as attending the courses, were regular attendants for all or part of the session.

« ZurückWeiter »