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THE

NEW-YORK REVIEW,

AND

ATHENEUM MAGAZINE.
Edited bus at hun Ecuina

VOL. I.

(MAY-NOVEMBER, 1825.

NEW-YORK:

E. BLISS & E. WHITE, 128 BROADWAY,

Clayton & Van Norden, Printers.

1825

CONTENTS OF VOL. I.

Page

144

459

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107 10

Aborigines of America, Traits of,
Account of Experiments with Kater's Pendulum,
Adiain's Mathematical Diary,
Anthon's Co rected Editions of Lempriere, Valpy and Nelson,
Beck's N. Y. Medical and Physical Journal,
Beltrami's Discovery of the Sources of the Mississippi,
Benson's Memoir belo e the Historical Society,
Controversy between Georgia and the Creeks,
Da Ponte's Translation of Part of Hadad,
Evereti s Osations,
Essay on Money,
Foresters, the,
Geology, Van Rensselaer's Lectures on,
Georgia and the Creeks,
Hillhouse's Hadad,

Do. Da Ponte's Translation of,
Husband Hunting,
Jehan De Nostie Dame's Lives of the Provensal Poets,

John Bullio America,

Journals of Madam Knight and the Rev. Mr. Buckingham,

Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court,

Lawrence's Address before the Acadeiny of Fine Arts,

Lionel Lincoln,

Prur

Literary Men, disorders of,

Madam Knight's Journal,

Mathison's Narrative of a Visit to Brazil,

Memoirs of Count Segur,

National Tales,

New Moral Tales,

Novice, or Man of Integrity,

Proctor's Narrative,

Provensal Poets, Lives of,

Rammohun Roy's Precepts of Jesus,

Schoolcraft's Travels,

Scott's Lives of the Novelists,

Shee's Alasco,

Sherburne's Life of Paul Jones,

Slave Trade,

Supplement to the Edinburgh Encyclopedia,

Travellers, the,

Toughtale's Travels,

United States Military System,

United States Literary Gazette,

Van Rensselaer's Lectures on Geology,

Verplanck's Evidences of Revealed Religion,

Wayland's Two Discourses,

Webster's Address,

Wheaton's Reports,

Bryant

župaint

Page.

Adrian Lubbersen, Letter of,

461

American Natural History,

82

Author of the “ Miseries of Human Life,”

392
Cloud Bridge, a remembered Vision,

324

Communication from M. Carey,

79

Dante, Critique on certain Passages in,

156. 241. 325
Death, Hymn to,

388
Death on the Pale Horse,

489
Death of the Flowers,

485
Division of the Earth,

242
Dying Raven,

76
Essay on the Character of Euripides as a Tragic Poet,

313
Extract of a Letter from an American Artist in London,

243

Fragment, To

154

Fragment of a Poetical Epistle,

319
Hymn of the Hierophant,

388
Hymn to Death,

168
Indian God and Bayader,

162
Johnson, Samuel, Letter of,

163
Journal of a Jaunt up the Grand Canal, -

381

Julio and Ada,

159

Law School at Northampton, -

822
Lotter from Miss Lucy Aikin,

74

Letter from Samuel Johnson to W. S. Johnson,

163

Letters from a Young American,

229

Letter from an artist in Italy,

396
Letters from Charles Watts to Wm. Sampson,

400. 473
Letter from Adrian Lubbersen,

461

Lines Written on revisiting the Country,

245

Literary Trifler,

refused

146

Literary Intelligence,

82. 169. 405. 486

Marco Bozzaris,

72

Memoirs of Col. David Mason,

301

My Father, a Sketch,

311

Musquito, to a

399

New Publications,

246. 328. 410. 490

Note on the most probable value in admeasurements, &c.

332

Objections to a Remark in Campbell's Lectures on Poetry,

386

Poet, the

488

Return of Autumn,

395

Recollections,

237

Sketch, a

472

Skies, the

158
Song of Pitcairn's Island,

78
Spirit of Spring,

83
Verplanck's Address,

158
Waits's Letters to Sampson,

400. 473
Wild Birds,

245

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THE

NEW-YORK REVIEW.

JUNE, 1825.

Art. I.--Hadad, a Dramatic Poem. By JAMES A. HILLHOUSE,

author of Percy's Masque,and The Judgment. NewYork. Bliss & White. 1825. Pp. 208.

Byr. e. Bryant Though the author of Hadad has chosen to give his work the more general denomination of a dramatic poem, it has all the incidents and characteristics of a tragedy. It is continued through the proper number of acts, is written with a sufficient regard to dramatic unities, and is furnished with a reasonable number and variety of characters. It has a regular plot and catastrophe, and the personages are all finally disposed of according to the fairest rules of poetical justice. Perhaps, however, the author was prevented from calling it a tragedy, by supposing that the nature of the subject, and the introduction of supernatural agents into the plot, would exclude it from the stage. Let it be a dramatic poem, then, since the author chooses to call it so-at all events, we are ready to acknowledge that it is a very good one.

The story of this drama is founded on the rebellion of Absalom. This is a very interesting event in the annals of the Jewish nation, and the actors in it were some of the most important personages of scripture history. How far subjects drawn from the sacred writings are proper for narrative or dramatic poetry, is a question about which there has been much discussion. It has been urged, among other objections to this use of such subjects, that it is a sort of unhallowed mingling of fiction with the pure truth of the sacred records, the tendency of which is to impair our reverence for the history of our religion, and our respect for the lessons which that history was intended to inculcate. We must say, however, that, with all proper deference for these scruples, we cannot help thinking them entirely unnecessary.

The human personages mentioned in sacred history must be considered as actual human beings, subject to the common passions and infirmities of our race, and, for the most part, to the ordinary influences of good and ill fortune. It cannot surely be VOL. I.

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