The Rudiments of Latin and English Grammar: Designed to Facilitate the Study of Both Languages by Connecting Them Together

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E. Duyckinck, and James Eastburn & Company, 1818 - 232 Seiten

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Seite 221 - Los números cardinales 0: zero 1: one 2: two 3: three 4: four 5: five 6: six 7: seven 8: eight 9: nine 10: ten 11: eleven 12: twelve 13: thirteen 14: fourteen 15: fifteen 16: sixteen 17: seventeen 18: eighteen 19: nineteen 20: twenty...
Seite 217 - For wheresoe'er I turn my ravish'd eyes, gay gilded scenes and shining prospects rise, poetic fields encompass me around, and still I seem to tread on classic ground; for here the Muse so oft her harp has strung, that not a mountain rears its head unsung, renown'd in verse each shady thicket grows, and every stream in heavenly numbers flows.
Seite 119 - GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF SYNTAX. 1. In every sentence there must be a verb and a nominative expressed or understood. 2. Every adjective must have a substantive expressed or understood. 3.
Seite 155 - COMPOUND SENTENCES. A compound sentence is that which has more than one nominative, or one finite verb. A compound sentence is made up of two or more simple sentences or phrases, and is commonly called a Period.
Seite 67 - MOOD. Present Tense, may or can. 1. Sim, I may be, Simus, We may be, 2. Sis, Thou mayest be, Sitis, Ye may be, 3. Sit, He may be ; Sint, They may be, Imperfect, might, could, wmtld, or should.
Seite 156 - But if a nominative come between the relative and the verb, the relative will be of that case, which the verb or noun following, or the preposition going before, use to govern.
Seite 159 - If the substantives be of different persons, the verb plural must agree with the first person rather than the second, and with the second rather than the third ; as...
Seite 221 - II. signifies two; III. three; XX. twenty; XXX. thirty; CC. two hundred, &c. But V. and L. are never repeated. When a letter of a less value is placed before a letter of a greater, the less takes away what it stands for from the greater ; but being placed after, it adds what it stands for to the greater ; thus, IV. Four. V. Five. VI. Six. IX.
Seite 197 - Thus le in lï!f<i is said to be short by authority, because it is always made short by the Latin poets. In most Latin words of one or two syllables, according to our manner of pronouncing, we can hardly distinguish by the ear a long syllable from a short. Thus le in ligo and ligi seem tn It...
Seite 218 - WHEN all Thy mercies, O my God, My rising soul surveys, Transported with the view, I'm lost In wonder, love, and praise.

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