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proceed to take into their serious consideration, the various and important inatters recommended to their attention

Ordered, That Mr. Smith, of South-Carolina, Mr. Clymer and Mr. Law. rance, be appointed a committee to prepare an address, pursuant to the said resolution.

A petition of Christopher Saddler, of Nova-Scotia, in the dominion of GreatBritain, mariner, was presented to the House and read, praying to be relieved from the forfeiture of his vesel and cargo, which have been seized in the port of Boston, for a violation of the impolt law of the United States, of which haw the petitioner was wholly ignorant.

Ordered, That the said petition do lie on the table.
And then the House adjourned until Monday morning eleven o'clock.

MONDAY, January 11. Several other members, to wit, from Conneđicut, Jonathan Trumbull; from New-York, John Hathorn ; and from Virginia, Andrew Moore, appeared and took their seats.

Mr. Boudinot, from the committee appointed to examine the Journal of the last session, and to report therefrom all such matters of business as were then depending and undetermined, made a report, which was read, and is as followeth :

It appears to your committee, that the several petitions of David Ramsay, John Churchman, Alexander Lewis, Arthur Greer, Jedidiah Morse, John Fitch, Englehart Cruse, Nicholas Pike, Samuel Briggs, John Christopher Stoebel, Leonard Harbaugh, Hannah Adams, Christopher Colles, David Green. leaf, John Macpherson, Abraham Westervelt, James Rumsey, and William Hoy, respectively praying for exclusive privileges, as authors or inventors of some useful work or discovery, were ordered to lie on the table, and so remained during the session.

It further appears to your committee, that the several petitions of Mattha Walker, Duncan Campbell, Tristram Coffin, William Finnie, Englebert Kemmena, Thomasin Gordon, Prudent la Jeunesse, Baron de Steuben, and Ri. chard Ham, respectively praying to be compensated for military services, or for injuries or losses sustained during the late war, were referred to the Secretary of the Treasury, to examine and report upon to the present session.

Ít further appears to your committee, that the several petitions of John M'Garragh, Dudley Tyler, Patrick Bennet, John Hurt, James Gibbons, Ar. chibald M'Alister, Alexander Power, Attorney for Colonel Flower's regiment, Henry Malcolm and Charles Markle, respe&tively praying to be compensated for military services rendered during the late war, were referred to the Secretary at War, to examine and report upon to the present session.

It further appears to your committee, that the several petitions of Andrew Newell and Seth Clarke, Sarah Parker, Bartlet Hinds, Robert Frazier, David Sturges, Richard Philips, James M'Lean, James Read and Thomas Barclay, respectively praying that certain claims which they exhibit against the United States, may be considered and allowed, were ordered to lie on the table, and so remained during the session.

It also appears to your committee, that the petition of Joseph Wheaton, ferjeant at arms to this House, praying an enquiry into the charges exbibited against him in certain anonymous letters, was ordered to lie on the table, and so remained during the selbon.

Your committee further report, that committees were appointed to prepare and bring in the several bills following, to wit:

A bill to establish an uniform system, on the subje&t of bankruptcies through Out the United States.

A bill for the further encouragement of the commerce and navigation of the United States.

A bill providing for the actual enumeration of the inhabitants of the United States.

Also, a bill providing a proper system of regulation for the militia. of the United States :

Neither of which bills were reported during the session.

It also appears to your committee, that there were postponed by this House, for further consideration, until the present fcllion, the several bills following, to wit:

A bill to promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and diso coveries.

A bill for the establishment of hospitals for the relief of sick and disabled seem men, and prescribing regulations for the harbors of the United States.

A bill concerning the importation of certain persons prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight.

A bill to establish a land-office in and for the western territory. Also,

A bill sent from the Senate, entitled, “ An a& for the punishment of certain crimes against the United States."

That the bill, entitled, “ An ad to establish the seat of government of the United States," was postponed by the Senate, for the further confideration of an amendment proposed by this House, until the present session.

And lastly : That the report of the committee appointed to examine into the measures taken by Congress, and the state of Virginia, respecting lands reserved for the officers and soldiers of the said State, was postponed by this House, for further consideration, until the present sellion

Ordered, That the said report do lie on the table.

Mr. Smith, (of South-Carolina,) from the committee appointed, presented," according to order, an Address to the President of the United States, in anSiver to his Speech to both Houses of Congress, which was read, and ordered to be committed to a committee of the whole House to-morrow.

On motion, Ordered, that the petition of Christopher Saddler, presented on Saturday. last, be referred to the Secretary of the Treasury, with instruction to examina the same, and report bis opinion thereupon to the House.

On motion,

Ordered, That a committee be appointed to prepare and bring in a bill, providing for the actual enumeration of the inhabitants of the United States :

And a committee was appointed of Mr. Foster, Mr. Goodhue, Ms. Sher. man, Mr. Lawrance, Mr. Schureman, Mr. Clymer, Mr. Seney, Mr. White, Mr. Smith, (of South Carolina,) and Mr. Baldwin.

A message, in writing, was received from the President of the United States, by Mr. Lear, his private Secretary, who delivered in the same, toge ther with the papers therein referred to, and then withdrew.

The said melage and papers accompanying it, were read, and are as follow:

UNITED STATES, January 11, 1790 Gentlemen of the House of REPRESENTATIVES, I HAVE dire&ted Mr. Lear, my private Secretary, to lay before you copy, of the adoption and ratification of the Constitution of the United States by the state of North Carolina, together with the copy of a letter from this

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Excellency Samuel Johnston, President of the Convention of faid State, to the President of the United States.

The originals of the papers which are herewith transmitted to you, will be lodged in the office of ihe Secretary of State.

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

FAYETTEVILLE, State of North-Carclind, 415 December, 1789. SIR, BY order of the Convention of the people of this state, I have the honor to transmit to you the ratification and adoption of the Constitution of the United States, by the said Convention, in behalf of the people.

With sentiments of the highest consideration and respect, I have the bo

por to be, Sir, your molt faithful and obedient servant; (Signed.)

SAMUEL JOHNSTON, President of the Convention. To tbe PRESIDENT of the United States. I DO certify the above to be a true copy from the orginal:

TOBIAS LEAR, Secretary to the President of the United States.

A Copy of the Adoption and Ratification of the Constitution of the United

States, by the State of North-Carolina
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA

IN CONVENTION. WHEREAS the General Convention which met in Philadelphia, in pur. suance of a recommendation of Congress, did recommend to the citizens of the United States, a Constitution or Form of Government, in the following words, vizi “ WE the People,” &c.

[Here follows the Constitution of the United States, verbatim.) Rcfolved, That this Convention, in behalf of the freemen, citizens and io habitants of the state of North-Carolina, do adopt and ratify the said Constjo tution and Form of Government.

Done in Convention, this twenty-first day of December, one thousand

seven hundred and eighty-nine. (Signed.)

SAMUEL JOHNSTON, President of the Conventions

jas. TATLOR, }Secretariai

BY the direction of the President of the United States, I have examined and compared the foregoing with the adoption and ratification of the Constitus of the United States, by the state of North-Carolina, which was transmitted to the President of the United States, by Samuel Johnston, President of the Cons vention of said State, as well as the transcript of the Constitution of the United States, recited in the said ratification, which I certify to be a true copy,

TOBIAS LEAR, Sccrctary to the President of the United States. Ordered, That the said message and papers do lie on the table. And then the House adjourned uncil to-morrow morning eleven o'clock

TUESDAY, January 12. The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a committee of the whole House, on the Address to the President of the United States, in answer to his Speech to both Houses of Congress.

Mr. Speaker left the chair. Mr. Baldwin took the chair of the committee. Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Baldwin reported, that the committee had, according to order, had the said Address under consideration, and made no amendment thereto.

Rcfolved unanimously, 'That this House doth agree to the said Address, in the words following, to wit:

SI R;

we

THE REPRESENTATIVES of the People of tlie United States, have lakeri into consideration your Speech to both Houses of Congress, at the opening of the present seslion.

We reciprocate your congratulations on the accession of the state of NorthCarolina ; an event, which while it is a testimony of the encreasing good-will towards the Government of the Union, cannot fail to give additional dignity and strength to the American Republic, already rising in the estimation of the world, in national character and respectability:

The information that our measures of the last session have not proved dissa: tisfactory to our constituents, affords us much encouragement at this juncture, when åre resuming the arduous task of legislating for so extensive an empire.

Nothing can be more gratifying to the Representatives of a free People, ihani the reflection, that their labors are rewarded by the approbation of their fellowcitizens. Under this impression, we shall make every exertion to realize their expectations, and to secure to them those blessings vrhich Providence has placed within their reach. Still prompted by the same desire to promote their interests which then actuated us, we lhall, in the present session, diligently and anxi. ously pursue those measutes which shall appear to us conducive to that end.

We concur with you in the sentiment, that agriculture, commerce and ma-, nufa&ures, are entitled to legislative protection, and that the promotion of science and literature will contribute to the security of a free government; in. the progress of our deliberations, we shall not lose sight of obje&ts so worthy of our regard.

The various and weighty matters which you have judged necessary to recommend to our attention, appear to us essential to the iranquility and welfare of the Union, and claim our early and most serious consideration. We shall procccd, without delay, to beltow on them that calin discullion which their iinportance requires.

We regret that the pacific arrangements pursued with regard to certain hof: tile tribes of Indians, have not been attended with that success which we had reason to expect from them : We shall not hesitate to concur in such further measures as may best obviate any ill effects which might be apprehended from the failure of those negociations.

Your approbation of the vote of this House, at the last session, respe&ting the provision for the public creditors, is very acceptable to us : The proper mode of carrying that resolution into efica, being a subject in which the future chara&ter and happiness of these States are deeply involved, will be among the first to deserve our attention.

The prosperity of the United States is the primary object of all our deliberas tions; and we cherish the reflection, that every measure which we may adopt for its advancement, will not only receive your cheerful concurrence, but will

at the same time derive from your co-operation, additional efficacy, in ensuring to our fellow-citizens the blessings of a free, efficient and equal government

Rcfolved, That Mr. Speaker, attended by the House, do present the said Address; and that Mr. Smith, of South Carolina, Mr. Clymer and Mr. Law. rance, be a coinmittee to wait on the President, to know when and where it will be convenient for him to receive the same,

A message, in writing, was received from the President of the United States, by the Secretary at War, accompanied by a statement of the south-western frontier, and of the Indian department, which were partly read.

And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.

WEDNESDAY, January 13. Several other members, to wit, from Connecticut, Benjamin Huntington; from New-Jersey, Lambert Cadwalader; from Penniylvania, Daniel Heisters and from Maryland, William Smiih, appeared and took their seats.

On motion,

Ordcred, That so much of the standing rules and orders of this House, as directs the mode of appointing comınittees, be rescinded; and that hereafter it be a landing rule of the House, that all committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, unless otherwise specially directed by the House, in which calc they thall be appointed by ballot; and if upon such ballot, the number required Thall not be ele&cd by a majority of the votes given, the House Thall proceed to a second ballot, in which a plurality of votes shall prevail; and in case a greater number than are required to compose or complete the committee shall have an equal number of votes, the House shall proceed to a further ballot or ballots.

The House resumed the reading of the statement of the south-western frontiers, and of the Indian department, as referred to in the President's message of yesterday; and having gone through the same.

Ordered, That the said message and statement be referred to a committee of five, and that Mr. Wadsworth, Mr. Brown, Ms. Boudinot, Ms. Burke, and Mr. Baldwin, be of the said committee.

Mr. Smith, of South-Carolina, from the committee appointed to wait on the President of the United States, to know when and where it will be convenient to him, to receive the address of this House, in answer to his speech to both Houses of Congress, reported,

That the committee had, according to order, waited on the President, and that he signified to them that it would be convenient to him to receive the said address at twelve o'clock to-morrow, at his own house.

And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.

THURSDAY, January 14. Two other members, to wit, Aom Massachusetts, Theodore Sedgwick; and from Pennsylvania, Thomas Hartley, appeared and took their seats.

On notion,

Ordered, That Mr. Livermore, Mr. Ames, Mr. Lawrance, Mr. Scott, and Mr. Smith (of Maryland) be added to the committee appointed yesterday, and to whom was referred the message of the President of the United States of Tuesday last, together with the latement of the southwestern frontiers, and of the Indian department.

Mr. Speaker, attended by the House, then withdrew to the house of the Prefident of the United States, and there presented to him the address of this House in answer to his speech to both Houses of Congress, to which the PreLident made the following reply:

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