The Modern Traveller: (340 p.)

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James Duncan, 1825
 

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Seite 325 - ... municipal laws and the administration of them. The number of offices has been considerably diminished, and responsibility rendered more direct and severe. The judiciary system has undergone many improvements, and nearly all the leading features of the law which did not harmonize with the principles of free government have been expunged, though some of the former evils still remain. The barbarous impositions on the aborigines have been abolished, the odious...
Seite 24 - How different are the feelings of the traveller when he passes from the dark low forests into the free and open tracts ! On these serene and tranquil heights the noisy inhabitants of the wood are mute ; we no longer hear the howling of herds of monkeys, the incessant screams of innumerable parrots, orioles, and toucans, the far-sounding hammering of the wood-peckers, the metallic notes of the uraponga, the full tones of manakins, the cry of the hoccoes, jacues, &c.
Seite 327 - ... volumes, the greater part rare and valuable. It is formed out of the library of the Jesuits, the books collected in the different monasteries, donations from individuals, and an annual appropriation by the government, and contains works on all subjects and in all the languages of the polished...
Seite 323 - The country curates are moreover enjoined to read the newspapers and manifestoes, regularly to their flocks. The spirit of improvement may be seen in every thing. Even some of those who are under the influence of strong prejudices against the revolution, frequently remark the changes for better, which have taken place. Their habits, manners, dress, And mode of living, have been improved by intercourse with strangers, and the free introduction of foreign customs, particularly English, American, and...
Seite 324 - ... consequent rise of property. Though the grounds in the neighbourhood of cities are highly improved, as I have already stated, agriculture, comparatively speaking, is in a low condition. In general the lands are badly tilled. The plough is rarely used, and the substitute is a very indifferent one. But notwithstanding the disadvantages of the present method of culture, I was informed by reputable persons, that the average crop of wheat is not less than fifty bushels per acre in good seasons. On...
Seite 254 - ... horse, or two or three, are given. These men have their use in the world; if this custom did not exist, all form of worship would be completely out of the reach of the inhabitants of many districts, or at any rate they would not be able to attend more than once or twice in the course of the year, for it must be remembered that there is no church within twenty or thirty leagues of some parts.
Seite 325 - ... produced the desired effect. Few of the youth of the country apply themselves to the study of theology, since other occupations much more tempting to their ambition have been opened to their choice. Formerly, the priesthood was the chief aim of young men of the best families who were desirous of distinction, as, in fact, it constituted almost the only profession to which those who had received a liberal education could devote themselves; which will readily account for the circumstance of so many...
Seite 97 - When a negro is so fortunate as to find a diamond of the weight of an octavo, (17| carats,) much ceremony takes place ; he is crowned with a wreath of flowers, and carried in procession to the administrator, who gives him his freedom by paying his owner for it.
Seite 98 - A word of command being given by the overseers, they instantly move into each other's troughs, so that no opportunity of collusion can take place. If a negro be suspected of having swallowed a diamond, he is confined in a strong room until the fact can be ascertained. Formerly the punishment inflicted on a negro for smuggling diamonds was confiscation of his person to the state; but it being thought too hard for the owner to suffer for the offense of his servant, the penalty has been commuted for...
Seite 97 - ... washed the earthy particles away, the gravel-like matter is raked up to the end of the trough ; after the current flows away quite clear, the largest stones are thrown out, and afterwards those of inferior size, then the whole is examined with great care for diamonds. When a negro finds one, he immediately stands upright and...

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