The Kitchen Gardener's Instructor: Containing a Catalogue of Garden and Herb Seeds, with Practical Directions Under Each Head, for the Cultivation of Culinary Vegetables & Herbs : with a Calendar, Showing the Work Necessary to be Done in a Kitchen Garden, in Every Month Throughout the Season : Also, Directions for Forcing Or Forwarding Vegetables Out of the Ordinary Season

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D. Mitchell, 1836 - 128 Seiten
 

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Seite 75 - Until the beginning of the eighteenth century, this valuable root was cultivated among us only in gardens or other small spots, for culinary purposes ; but Lord Townshend, attending King George the First in one of his excursions to Germany, in the quality of secretary of state, observed the turnip cultivated in open and extensive fields, as fodder for cattle, and spreading fertility over lands naturally barren...
Seite 96 - Mushroom beds are often formed in ridges in the open air, •covered with litter and mats, so as to prevent heavy, rains exciting a fermentation ; and sometimes in ridges of the same sort under cover, as in the open -sheds of hot-houses. They are also made in close sheds behind hot houses, or in houses built on purpose, called Mushroom-houses.
Seite 92 - The cucumber," Abercrombie observes, " bears male and female blossoms distinctly on the same plant. The latter only produce the fruit, which appears first in miniature, close under the base, even before the flower expands. There is never any in the males ; but these are placed in the vicinity of the females, and are absolutely necessary, by the dispersion of their farina, to impregnate the female blossom ; the fruit of which will not otherwise swell to its full size, and the seeds will be abortive.
Seite 94 - ... and it is then more apt to be confounded with other kinds of dubious quality ; but that species which most nearly resembles it, is slimy to the touch, and destitute of the...
Seite 95 - ... flat square bricks, which being done, set them on edge, and frequently turn them till half dry : then with a dibble make two or three holes in each brick, and insert in each hole a piece of good old spawn, the size of a common walnut ; the bricks should then remain till they are dry.
Seite 50 - ... sandy ground, well exposed to the sun ; manure it and give it a good digging, then mark it out into squares of six feet every way ; at the angle of every square, dig a hole twelve inches deep and eighteen over, into which put seven or eight inches deep, of old hot-bed...
Seite 97 - Observe, that in forming the bed, it should be a little rounded, in order that the centre may not be more wet or moist than the sides. This may be done in forming the sole or floor at first, and the bed would then be of equal strength in all parts. If it be made up against a wall in a cellar, stable, or shed, it may have a slope of a few inches from the back to the front, less or more, according to its breadth. I have sometimes...
Seite 19 - Strain your line along the bed six inches from the edge; then with a spade cut out a small trench or drill close to the line, about six inches deep, making that side next the line nearly upright...
Seite 17 - These meet with a ready sale in the markets, and the principal heads that are left are always larger and more handsome. The maturity of a full-grown Artichoke is apparent by the opening of the scales; and it should always be cut off before the flower appears in the centre; the- stem should be cut close to the ground at the same time. Artichokes are esteemed a luxury by epicures. To have them in perfection, they should be thrown into cold water as soon as gathered, and after having been soaked and...
Seite 97 - These should be new from the stables, and must, not be broken, and the drier the better. They may be collected every day until the whole floor or sole be covered to the above thickness ; but they must not be allowed to ferment or heat. In the whole process of making up, the bed should be as much exposed to the air as possible ; and it should be carefully defended from wet if out of doors. When this course is quite dry, and judged to be past a state of fermentation, cover it to the thickness of two...

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