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Of the wealth of matter preserved, and, as the difficulty in believing much that she says. Mr. Professor says, “ not infrequently concealed," Kenneth Bell writes with candour on 'Goldwin in such publications all genuine students are Smith as a Canadian,' revealing well the paradox

The difficulty has been to put one's of the former Oxford Professor's position. The hand on the piece of information or the special number is good reading throughout. subject required. This is solved by the fine Subject Index provided, a piece of laborious admirable writer of notes of travel, and her account

Miss ROSE BRADLEY, like Mrs. Woods, is an work which has been admirably performed. Thus we find almost two pages on portraits, near half in The Nineteenth Century of ' A Day in Provence, a page each on Gordons, and Mary, Queen of Scots, 1 dealing mostly with the dead glories of the City of and several references to Mr. P.J. Anderson, to Les Baux, is easily the most interesting

article in whom the book is dedicated. The first part of the

a number which contains little of literary interest, book is very full in its details, with various though the personal side of history is well reprenotes added by the editor, whose standing as an

sented by Lady Paget's account of ' A Royal Marexpert renders such information particularly riage,' s.e., that of King Edward, and Mr. W. S. valuable.

Lilly's of

Cardinal Vaughan,' mainly a summary of

Mr. Snead-Cox's notable biography. The Cardinal The current issue of The Quarterly Review, which was a wonderful worker for his Church, though he appeared late in July, has a specially interesting lacked the faculties which made Manning and article on The Character of King Edward VII., Newman eminent above their fellows. The Rev. in which private papers in the royal archives of D, W. Duthie deals with familiar matter in The Windsor Castle have been used. The young prince Women of the Paston Letters,' and adds little to was confronted with a scheme of education which our pleasure by his sentimental rhetoric on the was most careful and praiseworthy, and also subject of love. Besides political articles on singularly oppressive, one thinks, to the human boy Ireland, the Third French Republic, Protection in and young man. A striking letter from Sir Henry Germany, and the American Negro, there is one by Bulwer supplies hints as to the late King's gifts in Sir Edward Clayton on The Working of the early days. Dr. A W. Verrall's article on The Prevention of Crime Act,' which is well worth Prose of Walter Scott'is brilliant and attractive, attention. Mr. W. G. Burn-Murdoch has some like all his writing, and it fortifies the view long enthusiastic notes on Modern Whaling?; and held by the writer of these notes that Scott was at Mr. G. Clarke Nuttall should interest students of his best a great, if unconscious, artist in style. Dr. science with his remarks on 'The Eyes of Plants. Verrall analyzes the charm of that incomparable short story in 'Redgauntlet, Wandering Willie's Tale,' which Stevenson could not rival. Mr. F. G. Afalo's article on The Genius of the River' is commonplace. Mr. H. A. L. Fisher writes very well

Notices to Correspondents. on The Beginning and End of the Second Empire'; and Dr. Hans Gadow lucid on the disputed sub- We must call special attention to the following ject of Birds and their Colours,' i.e., the reasons

notices: which have been alleged for special coloration. Mr. Edwyn Bevan has an excellent subject in The and address of the sender, not necessarily for pub

On all communications must be written the name First Contact of Christianity and Paganism,' but his field of inquiry is more restricted than his title lication, but as a guarantee of good faith. suggests. A second article on 'Snoialism' is impor- We beg leave to state that we decline to return tant; and there is also a capital study of “John communications which, for any reason, we do not Stuart Mill’ by Mr. Wilfrid Ward. He has a sound print, and to this rule we can make no exception. judgment of the "saint of rationalism,” þut bardly indicates Mill's perplexing changes of view during nor can we advise correspondents as to the value

We cannot undertake to answer queries privately, various periods of his life, which make it possible of old books and other objects or as to the means of to quota his authority for opposed schools of disposing of them. thought.

EDITORIAL communications should be addressed The Cornhill opens with a facsimile of a translation to “The Editor of Notes and Queries?”-Adverby Thackeray of Béranger's poem 'Ma Vocation.' tisements and Business Letters to “The PubIt is not so much a translation as another poem on lishers" -at the Office, Bream's Buildings, Chancery the same subject, with touches of Thackeray's neat Lane, E.C. versification. Mrs. Woods's Pastel under the Southern Cross' is this month devoted to Cecil

To secure insertion of communications corre Rhodes and his tomb on the Matoppos, and is an spondents must observe the following rules. excellent piece of writing. The Lost Voice," by each note, query, or reply be written on a separate Sir George Scott, is an amusing story of the effect slip of paper, with the signature of the writer and on savages of a phonograph. The Master of Peter- such address as he wishes to appear. When answer house has an account of The Oberammergau ing queries, or making notes with regard to previous Passion Play in 1871,' which should be very useful entries in the paper, contributors are requested to to-day, not only from its knowledge, but also put in parentheses, immediately after the exac because it is likely to reduce the hysteria of heading, the series, volume, and page or pages to sentimentalists concerning the actors. Mr. Guy which they refer. Correspondents who repea Kendall's verse, 'The Whole Design,' is thoughtful queries are requested to head the second com and effective, though a little slack in form and munication “ Duplicate." phrasing. Miss Edith_Sellers has an indictment GALLOWAY FRASER (“Barabbas a Publisher").against *The Latter-Day Swiss,' in which she The authority quoted by you was evidently in errc proves an effective advocatus diaboli. We find no See MR. JOHN MURRAY's reply, ante, p. 92.

Let

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IT HAS AN INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION FOR ITS ILLUSTRATIONS

OF PLANTS.

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“The Gardeners' Chronicle has faithfully held to its promises. It is still, to-day, the best gardening journal, being indispensable equally to the practical gardener and the man of science, because each finds in it something useful. We wish the journal still further success.Garten Flora, Berlin, Jan. 15.

“The Gardeners' Chronicle is the leading horticultural journal of the world, and an historical publication. It has always excited our respectful admiration. A country is honoured by the possession of such a publication, and the greatest honour we can aspire to is to furnish our own country with a journal as admirably conducted.”—La Semaine Horticole, Feb. 13, 1897.

“The Gardeners' Chronicle is the most important horticultural journal in the world, and the most zenerally acknowledged authority.”Le Moniteur d'Horticulture, Sept., 1898.

8PECIMEN COPY POST FREE ON APPLICATION TO THE PUBLISHER, H. G.

G. COVE, 41, Wellington Street, Strand, London. Telographic Addross-GARDCHRON, LONDON.

Telephone No. 1543 GERRARD. May be ordered of all Booksellers and Newsagents, and at the Railway Bookstalls.

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Being a Directory of the Court, of Society, and of the

Political and Official World.

Including Celebrities in Art, Literature, Science, and
Sport, with many other subjects of current interest.

Edited by DOUGLAS SLADEN & W. WIGMORE

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SOME PRESS OPINIONS ON

THE GREEN BOOK OF LONDON SOCIETY.' STANDARD.-" This new publication is a sort of Debrett-Who's Who-Parliamentar

" Companion-Dramatio-Musical-Artistic-Literary-Sporting Blue-Book and Press Directory. I fact, it is even more than that.”

DAILY CHRONICLE.—“Will become indispensable as a ready, compendious, and accura source of reference.”

SCOTSMAN.—“Carefully arranged and provided with a key index, the book cannot fail to invaluable."

OBSERVER.- :-" The authors appear to have placed half London under obligation in the proce of collecting information...... Is entitled to the distinction of being one of the best reference boo published.

PALL MALL GAZETTE. ." While the scheme of the book is novel, its scope is in mar respects unique, and it is in every way a welcome addition to the writing table and the library.”

SPORTING TIMES.—“It is the most useful compilation of useful and trustworthy informati for publio speakers and public writers that I have ever seen.

REFEREE.—“Is probably the most comprehensive compilation of its kind that the world h yet seen.

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London: J. WHITAKER & SONS, Ltd., 12, Warwick Lane, E.C.

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Published , Printed by

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