The Florist and Pomologist: A Pictorial Monthly Magazine of Flowers, Fruits, and General Horticulture ...

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Published at the "Journal of Horticulture" Office, 1867
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Seite 22 - ... with a north-east aspect, in the islands of Corvo and Flores, the most westerly of the Azores. Its proper habitat appears to be on the mountains ; though it comes down nearly to the sea-shore, following the course of rocky mountain streams, where the atmosphere is kept humid by the spray of the water. The deep rich blue of its numerous flowers, and their long succession from the lateral branches, combine to render this species well deserving of cultivation, provided it can be brought to flourish...
Seite 207 - ... used for covering frames, pits, and all sorts of garden structures in winter. Thus they get the Lilac to push freely, and gather its white blooms before the leaves have had time to show themselves. The great degree of heat — a degree which we never think of giving to anything of the kind in England, and the total shade to which they are subjected, effect the bleaching. The French commence to cut the white Lilac at the end of October, and continue the operation till it comes in flower in the...
Seite 162 - L a vase half full of mignonette with a few blooms of sweet peas, and you get a charming effect, because you follow the natural arrangement by avoiding crowding of the blooms, and putting them with the green foliage which they want to set them off. Few people are aware, until they try it, how exceedingly easy it is to spoil such a pleasing combination as this; a piece of calceolaria, scarlet geranium, or blue salvia, would ruin it effectually. Such decided colours as these require to be grouped in...
Seite 207 - ... not like it — it pushes weakly and then does not look of so pure a colour as the ordinary lilac one. They force the common form in great quantities in pots, and to a greater extent planted out, as close as they can stand, in pits for cutting. The plants that are intended for forcing are cut around with a spade in September, to induce them to form flower-buds freely, and they commence to force early in the autumn. They at first judiciously introduce them to a cool house, but after a little while...
Seite 162 - ... flowers. Of all the various mistakes which are made by persons in arranging flowers, the commonest is that of putting too many into a vase ; and next to that is the mistake of putting too great a variety of colours into one bouquet. Every flower in a group should be clearly distinguishable and determinable without pulling the nosegay to pieces ; the calyx of a clove pink should never be hid by being plunged into a head of white phlox, however well the two colours may look together.
Seite 54 - I found the former, although rich and juicy, yet flat in flavour compared with those freshly gathered ; they lacked the crispness and aroma which were most agreeable in the latter. The great advantage in planting this sort is its tendency to bear fine fruit while the trees are young ; they are indeed so prolific that trees of only 2 feet in height have here borne nice crops of fruit. Some varieties, quite equal to the foregoing in quality, but without the red flesh, so peculiar to these " blood Oranges,"...
Seite 5 - ... resinous juice, which is extracted, and forms in the * Edinburgh Phil. Journ. t Proc. Geological Soc. Lond. Arb. Brit. various shapes of tar, pitch, rosin, turpentine, balsam, etc., a considerable article of trade and export. As ornamental trees, the Pines are peculiarly valuable for the deep verdure of their foliage, which, unchanged by the severity of the seasons, is beautiful at all periods, and especially so in winter; for the picturesque forms which many of them assume when fully grown ;...
Seite 205 - ... some Alpines we use equal parts of grit and earth —a mixture of rich loam and peat or leaf-mould. If not procurable, river-sand is the best substitute. Some species grow well in almost pure grit. There are, however, not a few, we have recently ascertained, which, though found in grit (' in glareosis alpium') in a wild state, thrive better under cultivation if placed in pure loam in a fissure of rock. The simple reason seems to be, that they are frozen dry, and kept dry for months, in their...
Seite 103 - District, would you allow me to direct the attention of those of your readers who are interested in the subject to Vol.
Seite 88 - Meetings will be held every Friday evening at the Society's Rooms, 84, Rue Grenelle St. Germain. On other days during the period, visits will be made to the Exhibition, to the Museum of the Jardin des Plantes, to private collections, and excursions will be made in the neighbourhood of Paris, especially towards the end of August. Vitality of Seeds. — M. Pouchet, of Rouen, the well-known advocate of the cause of spontaneous generation, has observed that a small proportion of the seeds of Medicago...

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