The Guardians in Action: Plato the Teacher and the Post-Republic Dialogues from Timaeus to Theaetetus

Lexington Books, 17.03.2016 - 497 Seiten
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If you’ve ever wondered why Plato staged Timaeus as a kind of sequel to Republic, or who its unnamed missing fourth might be; or why he joined Critias to Timaeus, and whether or not that strange dialogue is unfinished; or what we should make of the written critique of writing in Phaedrus, and of that dialogue’s apparent lack of unity; or what is the purpose of the long discussion of the One in the second half of Parmenides, and how it relates to the objections made to the Theory of Forms in its first half; or if the revisionists or unitarians are right about Philebus, and why its Socrates seems less charming than usual, or whether or not Cratylus takes place after Euthyphro, and whether its far-fetched etymologies accomplish any serious philosophical purpose; or why the philosopher Socrates describes in the central digression of Theaetetus is so different from Socrates himself; then you will enjoy reading the continuation of William H. F. Altman’s Plato the Teacher: The Crisis of the Republic (Lexington; 2012), where he considers the pedagogical connections behind “the post-Republic dialogues” from Timaeus to Theaetetus in the context of “the Reading Order of Plato’s dialogues.”

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Introduction The Guardians in Action
1 TimaeusCritias A Deceptive Cosmos of Words
2 Phaedrus as Fair Warning
3 Parmenides as Preliminary Training
4 Philebus As if in Battle
5 Beginning of the End Cratylus and Theaetetus
Index verborum
Index locorum
About the Author

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Über den Autor (2016)

William H. F. Altman, an independent scholar now living in Brazil, is a retired public high school teacher with more than thirty years experience teaching history, Latin, and the humanities.

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