The Kedge-Anchor

Cover
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt


Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 202 - The great merit of such a method of proceeding is, that, if the evolution succeeds, the ship, when round, will drift right down towards the man; and, although there may be some small risk in lowering the boat in stays, from the ship having at one period stern-way, there will, in fact, be little time lost if the boat be not lowered till the ship be well round, and the stern-way at an end. There is more mischief done...
Seite 22 - Pass the end of your rope round the standing part, and bring it up through the bight — this is one half-hitch ; two of these, one above the other, completes it.
Seite 147 - If he judges it to be a quarter or an half more than any particular number he calls, " And a quarter five — and a half four," &c. If he conceives the depth to be three quarters more than a particular number, he calls it a quarter less than the next : thus, at four fathoms and three quarters he calls, " A quarter less five,
Seite 306 - That the navy ration shall consist of the following daily allowance of provisions to each person : One pound of salt...
Seite 63 - The principal caution is to keep the lay in the rope, as it prevents the wet getting in. If the shroud is to be wormed and served in the wake of the dead-eye, the worming should not be hove in too taut, as breaking the shroud round the dead-eye would probably snap it. The score being well tarred, the end of the shroud is taken underneath, round the dead-eye, inside standing, or mast-head part ; a bolt is put in a hole of the dead-eye. Take a good strand, knot both ends together ; it is then middled...
Seite 68 - The topsail-lift leads through the lower sheave, and reef-tackle through the upper one. The topmast cap is next swayed up by the girtlines, which are to be lashed well up to the topmast-head for the purpose. Overhaul down before all the foremost ends, and secure them to the foremost bolts in the cap ; stop them to the centre ones, and also to the square-hole in the after part ; then sway the cap up ; when near up, cut the after stops, sway it upon the topmasthead, and the man aloft places it on,...
Seite 34 - Blocks frequently have th» hook working in a swivel in order to turn it, that the several parts of the rope of which the tackle is composed may not be twisted round each other, which would greatly diminish the mechanical power. The shell of a block is made of ash, elm, or iron, and has one or two scores cut at each end, according to its size ; these scores are for the purpose of admitting a strap, which goes round the block, in the centre of which is a hole for the pin ; the shell is hollow inside...
Seite 307 - ... for fourteen ounces of biscuit; half a pint of wine for a gill of spirits; half a pound of rice for half a pint of beans or peaa ; half a pint of beaus or peas for half a pound of rice.
Seite 48 - ... prepared for the purpose. Clap stout tackles on the heels, two on each, one leading forward, the other aft ; set taut the after ones, and belay them. Lash a three or four-fold block, as the upper one of the main purchase, over the...
Seite 24 - ... of the spikes or hooks, then take it round the other one, keep passing the rope yarns round and round in this manner, hauling every turn taut as you pass it, until it is as stout as you wish it to be. If it is to be a very large strap, marl it down with spunyarn; if a small strap, two rope yarns. A SHORT SPLICE. To splice the two -ends of a rope together, you first unlay the rope to a sufficient length, that is twice the circumference of the rope for the long ends, and once and a half the circumference...

Bibliografische Informationen