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“Mr. Addison is generally allowed to be the most correct and elegant of

all our writers; yet some inaccuracies of style have escaped him, which it is the chief design of the following notes to point out. A work of this sort, well executed, would be of use to foreigners who study our language; and even to such of our countrymen as wish to write it in

perfect purity.”-R. Worcester (Bp. Hurd]. “I set out many years ago with a warm admiration of this amiable writer

[Addison). I then took a surfeit of his natural, easy manner; and was taken, like my betters, with the raptures and high rights of Shakspeare. My maturer judgment, or lenient age, (call it which you will,) has now led me back to the favourite of my youth. And here, I think, I shall stick; for such useful sense, in so charming words, I find not elsewhere. His taste is so pure, and his Virgilian prose (as Dr. Young styles it) so exquisite, that I have but now found out, at the close of a critical life,

the full value of his writings.”Ibid. “Whoever wishes to attain an English style, familiar but not coarse, and

elegant but not ostentatious, must give his days and nights to the

volumes of Addison."-Dr. Johnson. “It was not till three generations had laughed and wept over the pages of

Addison that the omission [of a monument to his memory] was supplied by public veneration. At length, in our own time, his image, skilfully graven, appeared in Poets' Corner.-Such a mark of national respect was due to the unsullied statesman, to the accomplished scholar, to the master of pure English eloquence, to the consummate painter of life and

It was due, above all, to the great satirist, who alone knew how to use ridicule without abusing it, who, without inflicting a wound, effected a great social reform, and

who reconciled wit and virtue, after a long and disastrous separation, during which wit had been led astray by profligacy, and virtue by fanaticism.”—Macaulay.

manners.

OF THE

RIGHT HONOURABLE

JOSEPH ADDISON.

WITH NOTES

BY RICHARD HURD, D.D.

LORD BISHOP OF WORCESTER.

& Flew Edition,

WITH LARGE ADDITIONS, CHIEFLY UNPUBLISHED,

COLLECTED AND EDITED BY HENRY G. BOHN.

IN SIX VOLUMES.

VOL. IV.

LONDON: IIENRY G. BOHN, YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN.

MDCCCLVI.

JOHN CHILDS AND SON, BUNGAY

CONTENTS

VOL. IV.

PAGR

1 4

7 10

13

16 19 22 25

THE SPECTATOR.

No.
487. Essay on Dreams
489. On the Price and Success of the Spectator
489. Meditations on the Wonders of the Deep, with a

Hymn
494. On Religious Melancholy
495. On the Number, Dispersion, and Religion of the

Jews 499. Will. Honeycomb's Account of the Siege of Hers

berg, and his Dream 500. Defence and Happiness of a married Life 505. On Conjurors and Revealers of Dreams 507. On Party-Lies 511. Will. Honeycomb's Proposal of a Fair for Marriage

-Sale of unmarried Women 512. On giving Advice 513. Meditation on Death, a Hymn 517. Death of Sir Roger de Coverley 519. Meditation on animal Life 523. Poetry too often mixed with Mythology-Edict on

that Subject 529. Rules of Precedency among Authors and Actors 530. Account of the Marriage of Will. Honeycomb 531. On the Idea of the Supreme Being 535. On vain Hopes of temporal Objects-Story of Alnas

char .
536. The Author's Interview with a Lady-her Letter on

proper Employment for Beaux Character of a
Shoeing-Horn

28 31 33 37 40

47 50 52

55

60

PAGE

SPECTATOR.
538. On Extravagance in Story-telling-Epitaph in Pan-
cras Church-yard

63 542. Criticism on the Spectator-Letter on the Decay of the Club.

67 543. Meditation on the Frame of the Human Body

: 70 547. Cures performed by the Spectator

73 549. On Reluctance to leave the World—Letter from Sir Andrew Freeport on his retiring

76 550. Proposal for a new Club

79 556. Account of the Spectator opening his Mouth

82 557. On Conversation Letter by the Ambassador of Bantam

85 558. Endeavours of Mankind to get rid of their Burdens, a Dream.

89 559. The same concluded

92 561. Account of the Widows' Club

95 562. On Egotism-Retailers of old Jokes .

98 565. On the Nature of Man—of the Supreme Being 101 567. Method of political Writers affecting Secrecy—Specimen

105 568. Coffee-house Conversation on the preceding Paper

The Whole Duty of Man turned into a Libel 107 569. On Drunkenness

110 571. Advantages of seeking the Protection of the Supreme Being

112 574. Advantages of Consent

116 575. The present Life preparatory to the Happiness of Eternity ·

120 576. On Singularity; the Dread and Affectation of it

123 579. On Adultery-Dogs which guarded the Temple of Vulcan

125 580. On the Glories of Heaven.

128 582. On the Itch of Writing

132 583. Duty of being usefully employed-on Planting 134 584. Story of Hilpa

137 585. The same concluded

140 590. On Eternity 592. Dramatic Improvements-Criticisms

148 598. On a merry and serious cast of Temper

151 600. Various Opinions of future Happiness

153

143

159

THE GUARDIAN.

67. Fate of Poets-Recommendation of Tom D'Urfey
71. Observations of the Increase of Lions-Character of

a Lion
96. A Proposal for Honorary Rewards - Coins and

Medals

162

166

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