Indigenous Races of the Earth: Or, New Chapters of Ethnological Inquiry; Including Monographs on Special Departments...contributed by Alfred Maury...Francis Pulszky...and J. Aitken Meigs... Presenting Fresh Investigations, Documents, and Materials

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Seite 513 - And Adam lived an hundred and thirty years, and begat a son in his own likeness, after his image; and called his name Seth...
Seite 287 - ABERNETHY, which is strongly characterized, no person, however little conversant with natural history or physiology, could fail to recognize a decided approach to the animal form. This inferiority of organization is attended with corresponding inferiority of faculties ; which may be proved, not so much by the unfortunate beings who are degraded by slavery, as by every fact in the past history and present condition of Africa.
Seite 522 - Every living language, like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is in perpetual motion and alteration; some words go off, and become obsolete; others are taken in, and by degrees grow into common use; or the same word is inverted to a new sense and notion, which in tract of time makes as observable a change in the air and features of a language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face.
Seite xiv - Here we have, with reference to one genus of monkeys, the same diversity of opinion as exists among naturalists respecting the races of man. But in this case, the question assumes a peculiar interest, from the circumstance that the genus Cebus is exclusively American ; for that discloses the same indefinite limitation between its species which we observe also among the tribes of Indians, or the same tendency to splitting into minor groups, running really one into the other, notwithstanding some few...
Seite 334 - Dr James Johnson, speaking of the effects of impure air, says, ' that ague and fever, two of the most prominent features of the malarious influence, are as a drop of water in the ocean, when compared with the other less obtrusive but more dangerous maladies that silently disorganise the vital structure of the human fabric, under the influence of this deleterious and invisible poison.
Seite 288 - Through Crania Americana, it has long been known to the scientific world that a remarkable sameness of osteological character pervades all the American tribes from Hudson's Bay to Terra del Fuego. It is equally well known that the researches of Humboldt and Gallatin have demonstrated a conformity not less remarkable in the language and artistic tendencies of these numerous and...
Seite 581 - American race is essentially separate and peculiar, whether we regard it in its physical, its moral, or its intellectual relations. To us there are no direct or obvious links between the people of the old world and the new ; for even admitting the seeming analogies to which we have alluded, these are so few in number, and evidently so casual, as not to invalidate the main position ; and even should it...
Seite xiv - Vieivs o/Agassiz. 427 respecting the races of man. But in this case the question assumes a peculiar interest, from the circumstance that the genus Cebus is exclusively American ; for that discloses the same indefinite limitation between its species which we observe also among the tribes of Indians, or the same tendency to splitting into minor groups, running really one into the other, notwithstanding some few marked differences : in the same manner as Morton has shown that all tlie Indians constitute...
Seite 290 - Humboldt has remarked that there is no race on the globe in which the frontal bone is so much pressed backwards, and in which the forehead is so small.
Seite 291 - These heads are remarkable not only for their smallness, but also for their irregularity, for, in the whole series in my possession, there is but one that can be called symmetrical. This irregularity chiefly consists in the greater projection of the occiput to one side than the other, showing, in some instances, a surprising degree of deformity. As this condition is as often observed on one side as the other, it is not to be attributed to the intentional application of mechanical force ; on the contrary,...

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