Magnolia: The Genus Magnolia

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Satyajit D. Sarker, Yuji Maruyama
CRC Press, 02.09.2003 - 200 Seiten
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The genus Magnolia consists of several medicinally important species most of which come from Far East Asia. Many species of this genus have traditionally been used in China and Japan to treat various illnesses from simple headaches to complicated cancer, and because of their versatility have more recently been incorporated into commercially successful medicine preparations. And with the revival of interest in herbal and oriental traditional medicines, many of these Magnolia-containing preparations have captured a significant proportion of the drug market in the Western countries. In recent years several studies have been performed with Magnolia species, resulting in the isolation of a number of bioactive compounds and discovery of new biological and pharmacological activities. This book deals comprehensively with many aspects of the genus Magnolia detailing areas such as phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, quality control, and commercial significance.
 

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Seite vii - Natural products do not mean safe products and account of this has to be taken by the above industries, which are subject to regulation. For example, a number of plants which are approved for use in medicine must not be used in cosmetic products. The assessment of safe to use starts with the harvested plant material which has to comply with an official monograph. This may require absence of, or prescribed limits of, radioactive material, heavy metals, aflatoxin, pesticide residue, as well as the...
Seite iii - ... of industrial importance. Edited by Dr Roland Hardman Volume 1 Valerian, edited by Peter J. Houghton Volume 2 Perilla, edited by He-ci Yu, Kenichi Kosuna and Megumi Haga Volume 3 Poppy, edited by Jeno Bernath Volume 4 Cannabis, edited by David T.
Seite viii - By using bioassay linked fractionation of crude plant juices or extracts, compounds can be specifically targeted which, for example, inhibit blood platelet aggregation, or have anti-tumour, or anti-viral, or any other required activity. With the assistance of robotic devices, all the members of a genus may be readily screened. However, the plant material must be fully authenticated by a specialist. The medicinal traditions of ancient...
Seite vii - This series brings together information which is currently scattered through an ever increasing number of journals. Each volume gives an in-depth look at one plant genus, about which an area specialist has assembled information ranging from the production of the plant to market trends and quality control. Many industries are involved such as forestry, agriculture, chemical, food, flavour, beverage, pharmaceutical, cosmetic and fragrance.
Seite vii - The plant raw materials are roots, rhizomes, bulbs, leaves, stems, barks, wood, flowers, fruits and seeds. These yield gums, resins, essential (volatile) oils, fixed oils, waxes, juices, extracts and spices for medicinal and aromatic purposes. All these commodities are traded world-wide. A dealer's market report for an item may say "Drought in the country of origin has forced up prices". Natural products do not mean safe products and account of this has to be taken by the above industries, which...
Seite viii - Medicine and this office in 1994 assisted the filing of several Investigational New Drug (IND) applications, required for clinical trials of some Chinese herbal preparations. The significance of these applications was that each Chinese preparation involved several plants and yet was handled as a single IND. A demonstration of the contribution of efficacy, of each ingredient of each plant, was not required.
Seite iii - Gingko biloba, edited by Teris A. Van Beek Volume 13 Black Pepper, edited by PN Ravindran Volume 14 Sage, edited by Spiridon E. Kintzios Volume 15 Ginseng, edited by WE Court Volume 16 Mistletoe, edited by Arndt Bussing Volume 17 Tea, edited by Yong-su Zhen Volume 18 Artemisia, edited by Colin W.
Seite iii - Kren and Ladislav Cvak Volume 7 Caraway, edited by Eva Nemeth Volume 8 Saffron, edited by Moshe Negbi Volume 9 Tea Tree, edited by Ian Southwell and Robert Lowe Volume 10 Basil, edited by Raimo Hiltunen and Yvonne Holm Volume 11 Fenugreek, edited by Georgios Petropoulos Volume 12 Ginkgo biloba, edited by Teris A.
Seite vii - Drought in the country of origin has forced up prices'. Natural products do not mean safe products and account of this has to be taken by the above industries, which are subject to regulation. For example, a number of plants which are approved for use in medicine must not be used in cosmetic products. The assessment of safe to use starts with the harvested plant material which has to comply with an official monograph. This may require absence of, or prescribed limits of, radioactive material, heavy...
Seite viii - The high costs of such ventures and the endless competition from me too compounds from rival companies often discourage the attempt. Independent phytomedicine companies have been very strong in Germany. However, by the end of 1995, eleven (almost all) had been acquired by the multinational pharmaceutical firms, acknowledging the lay public's growing demand for phytomedicines in the Western World. The business of dietary supplements in the Western World has expanded from the Health Store to the pharmacy....

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