Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

Pagan.

in his right hand we are completely and for thus. It is a Roman Catholic maxim esever safe. Only let us be found in Christ; tablished not by private men, but by a public then the outward man may decay, the poor council, that “No faith is to be kept with frame may wax faint and feeble, the eye may heretics." This has been openly avowed become dim, even with the dim fixedness by the Council of Constance : but it never of death, and then when all earthly power was openly disclaimed. (Whether private has sunk under exhaustion, the eye will persons avow or disavow it.) It is a fixed open, a new world will spring up before us, maxim of the Church of Rome. But as long attendant angels will hover round the new- as it is so, nothing can be more plain, than born citizen of heaven, and without tears, or that the members of that Church, can give fears, or weakness, we shall behold Christ in no reasonable security to any government the brightness of his glory, and cry aloud of their allegiance or peaceable behaviour. in the heartfelt thankfulness of unutterable Therefore, they ought not to be tolerated by joy, “Salvation to our God which sitteth any government, Protestant, Mahometan, or upon the throne, and unto the Lamb."

Rev. E. HOARE. You may say, “ Nay, but they will take

an Oath of Allegiance." True, five hundred

oaths ; but the maxim, “ No faith is to be A LETTER

kept with heretics," sweeps them all away as From the Rev.'John Wesley, A.M., on Popery, a spider's web. So that still, no governors in the year 1780.

that are not Roman Catholics, can have any To the Printer of the Public Advertiser.

security of their allegiance.

Again. Those who acknowledge the Sir,--Some time ago a Pamphlet was spiritual power of the Pope can give no sent me, entituled, “An Appeal from the security of their allegiance to any 'governProtestant Association, to the people of ment; but all Roman Catholics acknowGreat Britain.” A day or two since a kind ledge this: therefore, they can give no seof answer to this was put into my hand, curity for their allegiance. which pronounces“ its stile contemptible, The power of granting pardons for all sins, its reasoning futile, and its object mali- past, present, and to come, is and has been cious.” On the contrary, I think the stile for many centuries one branch of his spiritual of it is clear, easy, and natural; the reason- power. ing (in general) strong and conclusive; the But those who acknowledge him to have object, or design, kind and benevolent. this spiritual power, can give no security for And in pursuance of the same kind and be- their allegiance: since they believe the Pope nevolent design, namely, to preserve our can pardon rebellions, high treason, and all happy constitution, I shall endeavour to other sins whatsoever. confirm the substance of that tract, by a The power of dispensing with any promise, few plain arguments.

oath, or vow, is another branch of the spiritual With persecution I have nothing to do. I power of the Pope. And all who acknowpersecute no man for his religious principles. ledge his spiritual power, must acknowledge Let there be as “boundless a freedom in re- this. But whoever acknowledges the disligion," as any man can conceive. But this pensing power of the Pope, can give no sedoes not touch the point: I will set religion, curity of his allegiance to any government. true or false, utterly out of the question. Oaths and promises are none : they are Suppose the Bible, if you please, to be a fable, light as air, a dispensation makes them all and the Koran to be the word of God. I null and void. consider not, whether the Romish religion Nay, not only the Pope, but even a priest, be true or false ; I build nothing on one or has power to pardon sins! - This is an the other suppositions. Therefore away with essential doctrine of the Church of Rome. all your common-place declamation about But they that acknowledge this, cannot intolerance and persecution for religion! possibly give any security for their alleSuppose every word of Pope Pius's creed to giance to any government. Oaths are no be true; suppose the Council of Trent to security at all; for the Priest can pardon have been infallible: yet, I insist upon it, both perjury and high treason. that no government, not Roman Catholic, Setting then religion aside, it is plain, ought to tolerate men of the Roman Catholic that upon principles of reason, no governpersuasion

ment ought to tolerate men, who cannot I prove this by a plain argument ; (let give any security to that government, for him answer it that can.)-That no Roman their allegiance and peaceable behaviour. Catholic does or can give security for his But this no Romanist can do, not only allegiance or peaceable behaviour, I prove while he holds, that, “ No faith is to be

kept with heretics," but so long as he ac- of man's words; to present them the knowledges either priestly absolution, or version of Sacy, approved by the Bishops the spiritual power of the Pope.

of France, and by the University; and to “ But the late act, you say, does not offer to Protestants the same book in the either tolerate or encourage Roman Ca- versions in use in our Churches ; such is tholics." I appeal to matter of fact. Do the task of these messengers. not the Romanists themselves understand it The Colporteurs also carry along with as a toleration? You know they do. And them tracts, composed by faithful Christians does it not already (let alone what it may versed in the Holy Scriptures. Such tracts do by and by) encourage them to preach are needful to awaken consciences, and openly, to build chapels (at Bath and else- make persons comprehend what is the howhere), to raise seminaries, and to make liness of the law of a God thrice holy, numerous converts day by day to their in- whose eyes cannot behold iniquity without tolerant, persecuting principles ? I can abhorrence, and who is too just to clear the point out, if need be, several of the persons. guilty. They are needful to direct those And they are increasing daily.

who are but little instructed in the study, But“nothing dangerous to English liberty and to explain to them the harmony which is to be apprehended from them.” I am exists between the different parts of the not certain of that. Some time since a sacred volume. They are needed to fix the Romish priest came to one I knew; and eye upon the “head-stone of the corner, after talking with her largely, broke out, the mystery of godliness, God manifest in “You are no heretic! You have the ex- the flesh,' and to shew that from the first perience of a real Christian !” “And would verse of the Bible to the last, Christ is you,” she asked, “burn me alive?” He said, spoken of as “the true God and eternal “God forbid !-Unless it were for the good life, the only Saviour, the only Head of of the Church !"

the Church.” In a word, they are desiNow what security could she have had for rable to supply the want of knowledge in her life, if it had depended on that man ? the humble peasant, and thus to furnish The good of the Church would have burst all him with means not only to defend himself the ties of truth, justice, and mercy. Espe- against error, but in his turn to attack, in cially when seconded by the absolution of a the name of his gracious Lord, and by the priest, or (if need were) a Papal pardon. declarations of His Word, every religion

If any one please to answer this, and to which does not proclaim salvation acquired set his name, I shall probably reply.-But by the precious blood of Christ, once offered, the productions of anonymous writers, I do to take away the sins of those who believe. not promise to take any notice of.

You, into whose heart the Lord has put I am, Sir, your humble Servant, the desire to contribute to the distribution JOHN WESLEY.

of the book of God, and to render testimony

to Him, know that the Colporteur ought City Road, Jan. 21, 1780.

daily to expect to meet with opposition to the circulation of the sacred volume. The

numerous blessings which, through the COLPORTAGE.

goodness of God, have accompanied this THE season is returned in which the dis. work; the miracles (for each conversion of tributors of the sacred volumes renew their a sinner, is it not a miracle?)--the miracles labours. More than forty Colporteurs, all which have been the fruit of the reading of French, with the exception of two, have that book, which alone is mighty to conquitted the domestic hearth to devote them- vince, correct, instruct, and give peace to selves to the different fields which the Lord the troubled soul, burdened by the sense of seems to have indicated. The great majo- sin; all the tokens, in a word, of the goodrity of these dear labourers belonged, a few ness of God which have accompanied this years ago, to the Roman communion. Con- work, must have awakened the hatred of vinced by the reading of the Bible, is it Satan, and we may expect it will manifest astonishing that they experience a desire itself in the first place, by persevering and to go among their former co-religionists, multiplied efforts to hinder the people from to make them acquainted with the good reading the Bible. tidings which are the foundation of their We speak not of the countries where the own hopes ?

Jesuits are seated on the steps of the To distribute in the midst of a Popish po- throne. There the Bible, prisons, servitude, pulation the book of God, without note or or obscurantism, and revolt, are terms, or comment, that is to say, without the alloy rather ideas, inseparable. But in countries where religious liberty has hitherto been and necessary to salvation. In the first enjoyed, how many obstacles seem to be part they join with us, in the latter they preparing! Already in France they talk stand single by themselves; and that is the of projects of a law to be presented to the safer way where both sides agree. Chamber of Deputies for arresting colpor- We say, the Sacrament of Baptism and tage. And while, under the cloak of the the Lord's Supper are two proper sacraments public journals, they suffer the humblest instituted by Christ. It is true, say they; families to be invaded with feuilletons filled but there are five more to be received as with impiety and impurity; while in all the true and proper sacraments. The first two towns the poorest may procure, for a few they confess with us, in the latter five they centimes, the most immoral works and the stand single by themselves; and that is the hideous fragments of the impiety of the past safer way where both sides agree. generation, there are some bold enough to We say, with the Evangelist, Thou shalt dare to arrest the dissemination of the only worship the Lord,' &c.--(Matt. iv.) It is book, which can promote the happiness of true, say they; but there are saints and man and stop the gangrene which devours angels also that are to be invocated and human society!

adored. In the first part they join with us, May the Lord, who works in us to will in the latter they stand single by themselves; and to do of his good pleasure, give us and that is the safer way where both sides grace to remember that he has granted a agree. way of salvation, but that there is but one We say, that Christ is the mediator and Saviour, and that the Bible is the word of intercessor between God and man. It is that Saviour. May he give us grace to true, say they; but the saints and angels remember, that to recount “ the noble works are our intercessors and mediators

* the noble works are our intercessors and mediators also. In that he has done,” is the high calling of the first part they join with us, in the latter every one of his redeemed! Let us, then, they stand single by themselves; and that is encourage the circulation of the word of the safer way where both sides agree. life, and may the Saviour deign, of his We say, that Christ is the Head of the goodness, to shed upon his Church in these Church. It is true, say they ; but there is days, a fresh effusion of the Holy Spirit, in also another visible head of the Church, order that every one who belongs to him which is the Pope. In the first part they may become a fellow-worker with him,- join with us, in the latter they stand single that the name of the only beloved Son of by themselves; and that is the safer way God may be glorified throughout the earth! where both sides agree.

We say, there are two-and-twenty books

of canonical Scripture. It is true, say they; THE PROTESTANT RELIGION,

but there are other books also, as Tobit,

Judith, &c., that are canonical. In the first “THE SAFE WAY..

part they approve all that we hold, in the By Sir HUMPHREY LYNDE, A.D. 1630. latter they stand single by themselves; and

that is the safer way where both sides agree. The following extracts are sufficient to “We say, Scripture is the Rule of Faith. prove that it is safer, even on Popish It is true, say they; but there are unwritten grounds, to belong to the Protestant traditions likewise that must be added to the Church than to the Church of Rome. Scriptures In the first part they join with The Papists, he observes, admit that “it

it us, in the latter they stand single by themis the safer way to persist in that Church

purch selves; and that is the safer way where both where both sides agree, than where one part sides agree. stands single in opinion by themselves.“Lastly, we say, there are Twelve Arti“ Now," he adds, “I will join issue with cles of the Creed, and this is the Confession them on this very point."

of all Christian Churches. It is true, say "First, then, we say there is a heaven they: but there are Twelve Articles more, and a hell. It is true, say they ; but there published by Pope Pius IV., to be receivea is a purgatory also. In the first part they by Catholics. In the first place they conjoin with us, in the latter they stand single fess all that we hold, in the latter they stand by themselves; and that is the safer way single by themselves ; and that is the safer where both sides agree. We say, we shall be saved by the merits

side, by the confession of our adversaries, and satisfaction of Christ. It is true, say

ts where both sides agree.they ; but there are, likewise, merits of saints, and satisfactions of our own, helpful

LOUGHBOROUGH AND ASHBY PRO. under the sanction of, and in co-operation TESTANT TRACT SOCIETY. with the parochial clergy. At a subsequent

meeting, they resolved to open a special The anniversary meeting of this Society, fund for defraying this new source of exwas held in the large room at the King's pence; and, with the consent of the subHead Inn, Loughborough, on Wednesday scribers to the special fund, they adopted as last, October 8. William Herrick, Esq., of their agent in Loughborough, the individual Beaumanor Park, in the chair. Present who had been placed there by the same inE. B. Farnham, Esq. M.P., R. G. Cress- fluential persons in the preceding year, and well, Esq., Revs. J. Dalby, E. H. Hoare, whose services had already been found so J. Babington, R. Stammers, T. Burnaby, T. effective. This plan, your Committee are Holme, &c., when the report, of which the happy to say, has fully answered their exfollowing is a portion, was received: pectations. By the assiduous and able ex

“In presenting their tenth report, your ertions of the Scripture reader, under God's Committee have again to use the language blessing, no fewer than twenty-two families of thankfulness and hope. Considering the have been reclaimed from the errors of Rodefensive character and limited sphere of manism during the past year. Twenty-five your Society's operations, they cannot have children, in addition to those reported last many new or striking facts to record; nor year, have been brought back from the Rocan they easily ascertain the exact amount mish school. And besides these positive of success in checking the progress of Ro- results, a considerable amount of good has manism, which may be due to their efforts been effected amongst those classes who apart from other means. Still, whatever be were most open to the solicitations of the their own share in the work, they feel them- priests. They are made aware that their selves justified in saying that, during the spiritual welfare is regarded with interest by past year, the cause of Protestant Truth has their Protestant brethren, and that, if they been generally maintained in the district. desire information, they have the ready While the proselytizing efforts of Rome means of obtaining it from one who comes have been carried on with unabated zeal, the among them with the two-fold authority of Committee are confident that she has not the Parochial Clergy and your Society. gained ground on the whole, and that there Already has the instruction, thus supplied is little reason to fear her advances, provided at the critical moment, been blessed to the that due pains be taken to enlighten the preservation of several families from apospeople. But on this condition the result of tacy, and to their clearer knowledge and the struggle depends. The machinery for more hearty reception of the truth. The the propagation of Romish error, is now so Scripture reader's visits generally are refully organized and brought to bear upon ceived with thankfulness, and are awakening the mass of the people, that, unless they are in many a spirit of religious enquiry and clearly instructed in the questions at issue, consideration, which, it is humbly hoped, some individuals cannot fail to be led away; may issue in more than a mere rejection of and accordingly, this has happened in several error. These good results will be more instances, especially amongst the poorest readily appreciated, when you reflect upon classes. Your Society's Tracts, if always at the various and powerful means which have hand and carefully studied, would supply been at work in favour of Rome, among the the requisite information to those who are people of Loughborough. Several Priests assailed. But without some agency to cir- and females, liberally aided by wealthy inculate them, and call attention to their con- dividuals, are employed in visiting from tents, to explain difficulties, to meet objec- house to house, and persuading the inmates, tions, and to answer the arguments which wherever they can gain a hearing, to fremay have been used in particular cases by quent the chapel, and to send their children the Priests, your Committee feel that the to the Romish school. About thirty Irish tracts themselves must be inadequate for families, resident in the town, constitute a the object in view. It is not enough to zealous and attached body of supporters : provide the weapons for our spiritual war- and those worldly attractions which Rome fare; they must also be drawn forth and knows so well how to use, are freely put brought into use.

forth as occasions arise. The clerical cos“Impressed with these views, your Com- tume and the processions now so frequent in mittee, after the last Anniversary, recorded the streets, recal to the memory of the intheir opinion that it would be expedient to telligent Protestant the struggles of past extend their means of defence against Ro- days, and afford a significant indication of mish aggression by the employment of lay the unchanged spirit of those who thus agency, where it should be practicable, openly set at nought the law of the land.

[ocr errors]

POETRY

ENGLAND AND WALES.-Leicester,

-“ It is rumoured in Leicester that the SACRED JOY.

Roman Catholics are about to purchase the

Three Crowns Inn, and in its place to erect There is a joy that thrills the Seraph's breast, And makes more pure e'en Heaven's all perfect a magnificent cathedral, similar to that rest;

lately built at Nottingham. They are now A joy that springs when swift, with trembling breath,

8 erecting a very large school at Ratcliffe, near The sinner flies the road that leads to death : the Syston station, and on Charnwood Then Angels, bending from their thrones on high, Forest is a monastry, inhabited by about List with deep joy his first repenting sigh,

thirty monks. The latter possess a farm of And view a captive break the chains of sin, Assured, through Christ, the victor's crown to win. about 250 acres, which they themselves culThere was an hour when the meek Saviour's eye, tivate, and to the poor of the neighbourhood Beaming with joy, was raised to God on high,-When, midst the woes he suffered for our sakes, they are exceedingly charitable.”—Lincoln A gleam of triumph o'er his sorrow breaks ;

Mercury. --- Wales-A plan, exceedingly One hour when he, the Sovereign Lord of all, Beheld from heaven, like lightning, satan fall,-

well calculated to promote Popish interests Beheld the triumphs of that wondrous Cross in the principality, has lately been devised, For which the faithful count the world but loss.

and is now being carried out, under Dr. There is a joy when, midst the gath'ring cloud, The thund'ring sky, and waters roaring loud,

Brown (of Downside discussion notoriety), When, midst the storms that toss his feeble bark, the vicar-apostolic of Wales. It is intended A gleam of light shines through the gloomy dark ;

to import a number of priests from Britanny. A voice is heard above the stormy wave; A hand stretch'd forth, omnipotent to save;

The natives of that part of France and And every throbbing fear is hush'd to rest,

the Welsh have one common origin, and As faith revives within his fainting breast. Yes, foes may rage and God's own name deny,

the language of each is very similar, so that His love despise, His mighty power defy;

the priests of Britanny will, in a very short Another Gospel men may strive to teach ;

time, be able to minister among the Welsh Another Christ than whom the Apostles preach; And Rome, proud Rome, may trample 'neath her people in their own language. Penryn, feet

Cornwall.--A large house and extensive garThose saints of God for Heaven's blest clime most dens have been purchased at Penryn, near

meet: But his own word declares how swift the day

Falmouth, for a convent, and Priest BugIs hastening on, when worlds shall pass away, genoms is at present in Belgium for the When sin shall cease, and Satan's reign be o'er, And foes usurp Immanuel's throne no more;

purpose of bringing over “ sisters of our His faithful followers then shall share his crown,

Lady" from Namur. A school will shortly And lost in joy at his right hand sit down.

be opened at the convent. Cornwall.ANON.

A correspondent of the Tablet, Nov. 1,

writes, “ This summer I have visited several INTELLIGENCE.

parts of England, but in no place have I

been more struck with the progress of the “PRAY WITHOUT CEASING.”—1 Thess. v. 17.

hess. v. 17. principles of our holy religion than in CornThe Committee of the Protestant Asso

wall.”.- Popish Chapel and Nunnery in

Hackney.-A commodious piece of ground ciation have adopted a memorial to the in

in the triangle and close adjacent to King Archbishop of Canterbury, on the subject of the recent apostasies from the Church of .

Edward's-road, at Hackney, has been pur

chased and taken possession of by Dr. England to the Church of Rome. We hope

we hope Griffiths, Titular Bishop of Olena, and other to give this at length in our next number.

trustees, whereon to erect a Popish Chapel Fifth OF NOVEMBER.-A Sermon was

and nunnery. The discipline of the latter preached for the Protestant Association, by the Rev. T. R. Birks, M.A., Rector of Char

by will much resemble that of the Sisters of

| Charity.---The Jesuits.---It is a fact, that Kelshall, on the evening of Nov. 5, in Fitzroy very many of the Italian teachers who are Episcopal Chapel, Fitzroy-square. The sermon, the text of which was Ezra ix. 13, de

engaged among the families of the upper 14, will be published by the Association.

0, classes, are Jesuits. A gentleman, well On the morning of the same day the Rev. th

acquainted with the habits and intrigues of A. S. Thelwall, M.A., preached for the As: cently, in the character of a teacher 01

Lev. this wily body, met one of their number resociation, in Sydenham Episcopal Chapel Italian, at a house where he was visiting. (Rev. T. P. Hutton's). . City of LONDON PROTESTANT ASSOCIA

The lady who was the pupil, was much surTION.—The first of a series of lectures was

prised at the rencontre between the Jesuit delivered to a respectable audience on the covery of the real character of the teacher,

S and the gentleman alluded to, and on dis

de evening of Nov. 3, in Albion Hall, London- imm

immediately dismissed him. The object of wall, by the Rev. A. S. Thelwall. Subject the Jesuits in thus intrudino themselves “The Political Principles of Popery."

« ZurückWeiter »