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1. Paraphrase this passage, (you will bear in mind that you are not asked to expand it, but to render the sense in different, though equivalent, words).

2. Parse the words in italics, and fully explain the construction of each with the rest of the sentence.

3. From what part of the Third Book is this passage taken, and to what does it refer? Give a short sketch of the course of thought which leads to it. Who were Thamyris and Mæonides?

4. Define an adverb and a conjunction. Mention words which are used as both one and the other, and show the points of approach and difference between these parts of speech. Illustrate your answer from this passage.

5. Classify (according to Morell's Analysis) extensions of the predicate,-1. As to their form ;2. As to their subject matter. Illustrate, so far as you can, the first of these two classifications from the above passage.

6. Point out forms of word or phrase in the above passage, which strongly illustrate the difference between the style of poetry and that of prose; and give in each case the reasons for your selection.

SECTION II.
I saw when, at his word, the formless mass,
This world's material mould, came to a heap :
Confusion heard his voice, and wild uproar

Stood rul'd, stood vast infinitude confin'd;
5 Till at his second bidding Darkness fled,

Light shone, and order from disorder sprung:
Sroift to their several quarters hasted then
The cumbrous elements, earth, flood, air, fire;

And this ethereal quintessence of Heaven
10 Flew upwards, spirited with various forms,

That rolled orbicular, and turn'd to stars
Numberless, as thou seest, and how they move:
Each had his place appointed, each his course ;

The rest in circuit walls this universe. 1. Paraphrase this passage (as above).

2. Parse the words printed in italics, and fully explain the construction of each with the rest of the sentence.

3. Analyse the two first lines.

4. What is the difference between the inflexion of the second person singular of the past tense of regular and of irregular verbs ? Explain the rationale of this difference, and illustrate by referring to the word seest in the twelfth line.

5. Write a short argument or analysis of the contents of the Third Book. On what grounds has the part describing the Limbo of Vanity been objected to? What poets besides Milton have described the creation of the world ?

6. Examine the assertion that the term copula has no place as a term of grammar.

FIRST YEAR.
Every candidate is required to write out the paraphrase, and do the parsing.
Besides this, he is to choose one question in each of the other sections.
Paraphrase the following passage :

3. The doctrine of hereditary right does by no means imply an indefeasible right to the throne. No man will, I think, assert this, that has considered our laws, constitution, and history without prejudice, and with any degree of attention. It is unquestionably in the breast of the supreme legislative authority of this kingdom, the king and both houses of parliament, to defeat this hereditary right, and by particulars, entails, limitations, and provisions, to exclude the immediate heir, and vest the inheritance in any one else. This is strictly consonant to our laws and constitution, as may be gathered from the expression so frequently used in our statute book, of “the king's majesty, his heirs, and successors." In which we may observe, that as the word “ heirs” necessarily implies an inheritance, or hereditary right, generally subsisting in the royal person; so the word “successors,” distinctly taken, must imply that this inheritance may sometimes be broken through ; or that there may be a successor without being the heir of the king.

SECTION I. Parse the following sentence:

This is strictly consonant to our laws and constitution, as may be gathered from the expression, so frequently used in our statute book, of “the king's majesty, his heirs, and successors."

SECTION II. No man will

any degree of attention. 1. What part of speech is that? In what other ways may the same word be used ? (Gire examples.) When may the relative be omitted in English ?.

2. What part of the verb are “assert,” and “considered,” if taken alone? What parts of every verb are incapable of making a complete assertion ? And to what other parts of speech are they most nearly equivalent ? (Prove the point by examples.) 3. Analyse the above sentence in its component parts, and show their relation to each other.

SECTION III. In which we may observe

heir of the king. 1. What is the antecedent to " which ?What do “subsisting" and "taken” agree with ? What parts of speech are through" and " being ?” In what case are “heirs," and " heir,” respectively, and why?

2. Point out all the conjunctions in the above sentence, and show which words or clauses they couple. Point out, likewise, all the adverbs, and show what words they qualify.

3. Parcel out the above passage into simple sentences, and show how they stand connected grammatically with each other.

SECTION IV. 1. In the whole passage given to paraphrase, point out all the prefixes, or affixes, or both; and show what each of them signifies.

2. Give the roots of as many of the following words as you are able, with their literal meanings :

Doctrine-hereditary-indefeasible-imply-constitution-prejudice-degree-- attention - unquestionably-supreme-parliament-particular - limitations-provisions --exclude -- consonant- - expression--successors.

SCHOOL MANAGEMENT.-SECOND YEAR. Write the first line of your first answer as a specimen of copy-setting in large hand; and the first line of your second answer as a specimen of copy-setting in small hand.

SECTION I.
How would you teach-

1. Double Rule of Three.
2. Division of Fractions.
3. Reduction of Circulating Decimals.

SECTION II. 1. How would you give children a clear conception of latitude, longitude, the points of the compass, and the measurement of distances on a map ?

2. Enumerate the means which you would use to fix in the memory of a child the physical geography of any country:

3. How would you endeavour to give to an advanced class of children a conception of the life of a nation, as distinct from the mere series of events in its history?

* SECTION III. What registers must be used, and how must they be kept, to enable a schoolmaster at any time easily to state

11. How many boys there are in his school between the ages of nine and eleven?
2. How many boys in his school are learning compound division ?
3. How many boys have been in the school more than three years and less than four ?

* SECTION IV. 1. Given the number in school on every morning and afternoon that the school has been open during the week, how do you find the average attendance for that week?

2. Explain how it is possible that the total arerage attendance in a school may be high as compared with that of other schools, and yet the average number of days on which each child has attended may be low. How can you find the average number of days attended by each child present at all?

3. Given the number of half-days that each child has attended, and the number of half-days that the school has been open, during the quarter, how do you find the average attendance for that quarter ?

SECTION V. 1. In what different ways may a school be divided into classes, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of each ?

2. What lessons are best given to children in the gallery, what to children at their desks, and what to children standing round the teacher? Give reasons in each instance. *3. Write a short theme on one of the following subjects :

1. Fighting among boys.
2. A schoolmaster's private studies.
3. The comparative advantages and disadvantages of the private and public schoolmaster;

meaning by private, the master who keeps school on his own account, and by public, the
master who is employed by trustees or managers.

SECTION VI,
Give the abstract of a lesson-
1. From the Irish fourth book, on

a. The leaf of a plant, or
b. The division of labour, or

c. The employment of materials of little value. 2. From the British and Foreign fourth book, on

a. The feudal system, or
b. The air pump, or

c. Fishes.
3. From McCulloch's Course of Reading, on

a. The winds, or
6. The circulation of the blood, or
c. Egyptian antiquities.

FIRST YEAR.

SECTION 1. Describe one of the following methods of teaching to read, and point out its advantages and disadvantages :

1. The alphabetic method.
2. The phonic method.
3. The look-and-say method.

* Extract from Minutes, 1852, 1853, Vol. I., p. 55: “Her Majesty's Inspectors are required to note those schools in which the Registers are either imperfect or imperfectly kept. The Committee of Council would consider continued neglect in this particular as a ground for ultimately withholding annual grants from the school in question.”

SECTION II. 1. Describe Mulhauser's method of teaching to write. 2. Describe the method proposed by Locke, and point out its advantages and disadvantages.

3. Compare the two methods and explain which you would use with a child that fell behind the class in penmanship.

SECTION III. 1. What general rules can be traced in the pronunciation of the English vowels ?

2. Explain the system on which the English alphabet has been framed, giving the reasons for the names of each letter. 3. Describe a series of dictation lessons graduated so as to illustrate the difficulties of English spelling.

SECTION IV.
Describe the best method of teaching-

1. Notation, or
2. Subtraction, or
3. Division,

CLASS LIST.

Of Students in Normal Schools, and Teachers in Elementary Schools, examined

before Her Majesty's Inspectors of Schools, at Christmas, 1855.

BOROUGH ROAD :-BRITISH AND FOREIGN SCHOOL SOCIETY.

Students of the Second Year.

FIRST CLASS. *Bithell, James. *Pope, Albert James. *White, Frederick.

FIRST CLASS. *Bradley, John James. *Croad, Charles William. *Jennett, Edward Henry. *Lewton, Samuel. *Reeves, James Cross. *Roscoe, James. *Stevens, Andrew. *Whaley, John Walmsley.

SECOND CLASS. Ashton, Jonas. Burgess, John.

SECOND CLASS.

THIRD CLASS. *Heppard, William.

*Goddard, James (D.)
*Hayes, Henry.

Lowry, Francis.
Students of the First Year.
*Clark, John.

Sweet, Frederick.
*Crook, Richard.

Whitehead, Eli.
*Fewings, John Annely.
*Gordon, Francis Muir.

THIRD CLASS.
Jenkins, John.

Arden, James Lotherington.
Jones, Edward.

Bird, Edward.
Metcalfe, Thomas.

*Evans, John.
*Morgan, David.

Filer, Charles. Porter, Charles Augustus. *Hayes, Charles James. *Rooke, George.

*Lenton, James. *Schofield, John.

Parr, Thomas. *Seago, William James.

Roberts, Joseph.
*Sole, William John.

Sutcliffe, John.
Female Students of the Second Year.
Finey, Harriet.

THIRD CLASS.
Gale, Georgina.

None.
Outing, Susannah.
Female Students of the First Year.
Hall, Caroline.

Wray, Jane.
Jenman, Mahalah.

Wood, Mary,
Jones, Sarah Anne.
Kerry, Matilda,

THIRD CLASS.
King, Fanny Grace.

Akass, Ann.
Ludlow, Mary Jane.

Bearman, Louisa.
Martin, Lucy Ann.

Bowen, Elizabeth.
Mosley, Hannah.

Darley, Caroline Mackenzie. *Riley, Alice.

Furlong, Elizabeth.
Rundle, Joanna.

Green, Martha.
Smith, Isabella Sarah.

Henderson, Alexandrina.
Smith, Mary.

Hulford, Martha Susan. *Spencer, Harriet.

*Maizey, Fanny Chapman. Standley, Ann.

Smith, Susan.

SECOND CLASS.
Bates, Emma.
Farmer, Ann.

FIRST CLASS.

Hallam, Mary. *Harding, Mary. *Hildred, Anne. *Holbrook, Elizabeth. Parish, Ann Elizabeth. Reynolds, Mary Anne.

SECOND CLASS.

Crouch, Jane.
Davis, Sarah.

* To these candidates Drawing prizes have been awarded by the Department of Science and Art.

MASTERS of SCHOOLS not connected with the CHURCH of ENGLAND,

A.-TEACHERS ABOVE 35 YEARS OF AGE.

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MISTRESSES of SCHOOLS not connected with the Church of ENGLAND.

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* To these candidates Drawing prizes have been awarded by the Department of Science and Art. LETTER TO THE EDITOR.

BOOK-KEEPING. SIR,—The following rules for posting accounts into the Ledger may probably prove of service to some teachers :

1st. When yon purchase goods, copy the invoices in the Invoice Book, then carry the account forward to the Journal, and write Goods Account-To Mr. A.

0 0 0 Mind and take the date and folios. If there be two or more invoices on the same date and page you can say in the Journal,

Goods Account to Sundries.
Mr. A.

0 0 0
Mr. B.

0 0 0

..........

0 0 0

Then carry forward to the Ledger, and make each person's account Cr.
by Goods Account

0 0 0
And Goods Account Dr. to persons

0 0 0 Mind and notice the date and folios.

2nd. When you sell the goods, enter the sales in the Sales' Book, then take the account to the Journal, and write

Mr. C.
To Goods Account......

0 0 0
Or, if there be more than one sale on the same date and page, write
Sundries to Goods Account.
Mr. D.

0 0 0
Mr. E.

0 0 0 Mr. F.

0 0 0

0 0 0

Then carry the accounts forward to the Ledger, and make the person's account Dr. to Goods Account, and Goods Account Cr. by the person. Mind and notice the date and folios.

3rd. When you pay a person, make the Cash Book Cr. by the person. At the close of the day enter the account in the Journal, and write

Mr. A.
To Cash

0 0 0
Or if more than one payment be made on the same folio write
Sundries to Cash.
Mr. C.

0 0 0
Mr. D.

0 0 0 Mr. E

0 0 0

0 0 0

Then carry it to the Ledger, and make each person's account Dr. to their amount.

4th. When a person pays you, make Cash Book Dr, to that person, and in the evening take the account to the Journal, and write

Cash Dr.
To Mr. E.

0 0 0
If more than one person pay you on the same day and on the same page, write
Cash to Sundries.
Mr. F.

0 0 0
Mr. G.

0 0

0

0 0 0 Then carry it to the Ledger, and make each person's account Cr. by Cash, Notice dates and folios.

5th. When you pay out money for expenses enter the partieulars in the Expense Book, and at the close of the week, or the close of the month (according as you like to sum up the expenses), enter it in the Journal, and write

Expense Account.
To Cash

0 0 0 Then

carry it to the Cash. Book, and make it Cr. by
Expense Account

0 0 0
Then carry it to the Ledger, and make the Expense Account Di.
To Cash

0 0 0

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