What is History?: The George Macaulay Trevelyan Lectures Delivered in the University of Cambridge January-March 1961

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Penguin, 1990 - 188 Seiten
Ranke, stating what he considered the proper aim of the historian, filled generations of historians after him with a burning zeal for objectivity. But who is to say how things were? In formulating a modern answer to the question 'What is History?' Professor Carr shows that the 'facts' of history are simply those which historians have selected for scrutiny. Millions have crossed the Rubicon, but the historians tell us that only Caesar's crossing was significant. All historical facts come to us as a result of interpretative choices by historians influenced by the standards of their age. Yet if absolute objectivity is impossible, the role of the historian need in no way suffer; nor does history lose its fascination. This posthumous edition includes new material by R.W. Davies which presents the major conclusions of Professor Carr's notes for the second edition and a new preface by the author, in which he reflects on the current mood of pessimism and despair among Western intellectuals and calls for a saner and more balanced outlook on the future'.

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Nutzerbericht  - antiquary - LibraryThing

It puzzles me that Carr was taken so seriously as a "distinguished historian" in British academic circles, considering that he spent the first part of his career championing appeasement of Germany and much of the rest admiring Stalin. Vollständige Rezension lesen

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Nutzerbericht  - JonArnold - LibraryThing

Going back to re-read old university textbooks for fun must be a sign of incipient nostalgia for the lost days of youth. That or masochism. I didn’t get a nostalgic buzz (possibly as I was young and ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

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Über den Autor (1990)

Edward Hallett Carr was born in 1892. He joined the Foreign Office in 1916 and worked there in many roles until 1936 when he became Woodrow Wilson Professor of International Politics at the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. After the war he became a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford and then of Trinity College, Cambridge. His major work was the 14-volume A History of Soviet Russia (published 1950-78). What Is History? is based on his Trevelyan Lectures, delivered in 1961. He died in 1982.

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