The Code of Health and Longevity: Or, a Concise View, of the Principles Calculated for the Preservation of Health, and the Attainment of Long Life, Band 3

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A. Constable & Company, 1806
 

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Seite 52 - ... been translated into English under the title of ' Sure and certain Methods of attaining a long and healthy Life.
Seite 76 - But what delights me most is, in my journeys backwards and forwards, to contemplate the situation and other beauties of the places I pass through -, some in the plain, others on hills, adjoining to rivers or fountains ; with a great many fine Houses and gardens.
Seite 92 - Nor do I ever find myself the worse for writing immediately after meals; nor is my understanding ever clearer ; nor am I apt to be drowsy ; the food I take being in too small a quantity to send up any fumes to the brain. O, how advantageous it is to an old man to eat but little ! Accordingly, I who know it eat but just enough to keep body and soul together...
Seite 90 - ... advance in years, cannot however be brought to retrench the quantity of their food, nay they rather increase it. And because they find themselves unable to digest the great quantity- of food with which they must load their stomachs by eating twice in the four-and-twenty hours, they make a resolution to eat but once, that the long interval between one meal and the other may enable them to eat, at one sitting, as much as they used to do in two: thus they eat till their stomachs...
Seite 91 - Thou, moreover, freest him from the dreadful thoughts of death. How greatly is thy faithful disciple indebted to thee, since by thy assistance he enjoys this beautiful expanse of the visible world, which is really beautiful to such as know how to view it with a philosophic eye, as thou hast enabled me to do. Nor could I, at any other time of life, even when I was young, but altogether debauched by an irregular life, perceive its beauties, though I 'spared no pains or expense to enjoy every season...
Seite 98 - ... together, so as to render them inseparable, and incapable of alteration or fermenting ; circumstances which engender cruel fevers, and end in death. It is true indeed, and it would be a folly to deny it, that, let our humors be originally ever so good, time, which consumes every thing, cannot fail to consume and exhaust them ; and that man, as soon as that happens, must die of a natural death ; but yet, without sickness, as will be my case, who shall die at my appointed time, when...
Seite 74 - ... gentlemen ; men valuable for their good sense and manners, their acquaintance with letters, and every other good quality. Then, when I cannot enjoy their conversation, I betake myself to the reading of some good book. When I have read as much as I like, I write ; endeavouring in this as in every thing else, to be of service to others, to the utmost of my power.
Seite 102 - Now, as some of these people think these are trials sent them by God Almighty with a view of promoting their salvation, that they may do penance in this life for their past -errors, I cannot help saying, that, in my opinion, they are greatly mistaken. For I can by no means believe, that it is agreeable to the Deity, that man, his favorite creature, should live infirm, melancholy, and dissatisfied; but rather enjoy good health and spirits, and be always content within himself. ' In this manner did...
Seite 105 - ... was indeed next to a miracle how I could write so much, and upon subjects that required both judgment and spirit. And indeed, my Lord, it is incredible, what satisfaction and pleasure I have in these compositions. But as I write to be useful, your Lordship may easily conceive what pleasure I enjoyed.
Seite 106 - I cannot drink any wine, of whatever kind or country ; for, besides being these two months quite disgustful to my palate it disagrees with my stomach. Thus losing my milk (for wine is indeed the milk of old age), and having nothing to drink, for no change...