Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

ARTYUL Question.-Dominico, the barle

THE TALISMAN. quin, going to see Louis XIV. at supper, fixed his eye on a dish of partridges. The King who WORCESTER, SATURDAY, MAY 17, 1828. was fond of his acting, said, “Give that dish to Dominico." " And the partridges too sire?”

So little of interest has occurred since our last Louis penetrating his art, replied, “ And the that we have preferred occupying the space partridges too.” The dish was of gold. usually allotted to a summary of events, with

miscellaneous matter selected from works of a DANCING.–When Commodore Anson was popular character, rather than with any specat Canton, the officers of the ship Centurion

ulations of our own, Had we been inclined gave a ball. While they were dancing, a Chi- | to annoy our readers with politics, the contest nese, who very quietly surveyed the operation, ll for the next Presidential election would fursaid softly to one of the company," why don't you let your servants do this?"

nish a constant supply of inflamatory materi

als. But as we disclaim any such intentions, WAITEFIELD.Dr. Franklin, in his me

we presume our readers will be pleased with moirs, bears witness to the extraordinary effect

the substitute we have made. which was produced by Mr. Whitefield's preaching in America ; and relates an anec

MORAL SENTIMENTS. dote equally characteristic of the preacher and of himself." I happened,” says the doctor,

To insinuale a thing prejudicial to another, 66 to attend one of his sermons, in the course

which we are not willing openly to avow, is a of which I perceived he intended to finish with || kind of mental assassination. a collection, and I silevtly resolved he should

He is a brave man who dares to meet himget nothing from me. I had in my pocket a

self alone in the open field, to examine his handful of copper money, three or four silver / heart, upinfluenced by the world. dollars, and five pistoles in gold. As he pro

The love of money is an opiate, that often ceeded, I began to soften, and concluded to

lulls conscience asleep, and binds the judg.

ment in chains. give the copper. Another stroke of his oratory made me ashamed of that, and determined

They who are the least apt to offend, are me to give the silver and he finished so admi- || the most ready to forgive. rably, that I emptied my pocket wholly into

In religious disquisitions, the tongue does the collector's dish, gold and all. At this ser

not always represent the mind. mon there was also one of our club, who, be

A man without discretion is like a ship ing of my sentiments respecting the building

without a helm. in Georgia, and suspecting a collection might be intended, had by precaution emptied his

Married, pockets before he came from home ; towards

In Lancaster, Mr. Joel Wilder, jun, to Miss the conclusion of the discourse, however, he Deborah H. Whitman. felt a strong inclination to give, and applied In Oxford, on the 4th inst, by the Rev. Mr. to a neighbor who stood near him to lend him

Maynard, Mr. Charles J. Westcott, of Cranssome money for the purpose. The request was ton, R. I. to Miss Melina Stone, of the former fortunately made to perhaps the only man in

place. the company who had the firmness not to be

In New Braintree, on the 5th iost. by Rev. affected by the preacher. His answer was, John Fiske, Mr. George Merriam, of Brook"at any other time, friend Hodgkinson, 1 field, to Miss Abigail Little, of New Braintree; would lend thee freely; but not now,

for thee

Mr. Augustus Makepiece, of Brookfield, to seems to be out of thy right senses."

Miss Nancy M. Gleason, of New Braintree;
Mr. Charles Wetherbee, of Brookfield, to Miss

Abigail H. Bartlett, of New Braintree; Mr. Some years ago, when the famous Dr. Leib | James Joslyn, to Miss Francis Pierce, both of was figuring in political life, prejudices were New Braintree. strong, and party feeling ran bigh-application In North Brookfield, by Rev. Thomas Snell, was made to the Legislature of Pennsylvania || Mr. John Wesion of New Braintree, to Miss to incorporate a "Life Insurance Company” || Adaline Tidd of North Brookfield. for the term of fifty years. A zealous member rose and addressed Mr. Speaker with “Sir, I dont't like this bill, and I shan't vote for it.

Died, The petitioners have asked to be incorporated In this town, on the 28th ult. Mrs. Dolly to insure lives for fifty years, and what will Chadwick, wife of Mr. Isaac Chadwick, aged be the consequence of granting their prayer? 61. why, the first thing you'll know that devil of Io Cincinnati, Ohio,on the 22d ull. Ephraim a Dr. Leib, will get his life insured for the || Wilder Fairbanks, of Oakham, aged 24. whole time, and we shall have him torment In Graston, on the 1st inst. Mrs. Lucy ing us for a half a century to come."

Wheeler, wife of Martin Wheeler, aged 31.

[ocr errors]

the wall, accompanied by the tears and y himself beyond expression,” and received a wishes of the repentant beauty. to a

diamond ring and purse of gold from the pres. short time, a shout from the menials an

ident and professors. The next day be engag. nounced that the adventure had been times in succession. From Paris he went to

ed in a tilting match and won the prize fifteen achieved; and Cunigunda, exulling that Rome, where he gave a similar exhibition of she was conquered, hastened into the || bis wonderful powers of mind. From Rome court, which the triumphant knight was

he went to Venice, where he received the

thanks of the Doge and Senate for a speech just entering, to meet his ardent caresses.

of surprising eloquence which became the Butthe knight stood aloof, gloomy and se

theme of admiration in the whole city. From vere. “I can claim you,” said he;" but thence he went to the University of Padua, I am come, and I have risked my life, then in great reputation. A meeting of all not to win your hand, but to humble your the learned men in the city was held, and pride, and punish your barbarity_and after which he disputed six hours with the

Crichton opened it with an extempore poem, thereupon he read her a harsh lecture

most learned of the professors, and closed with on the cruelty and arrogance of her con an extempore oration in praise of ignorance. duct towards her suitors. The spirit of He here also continued a dispute upon sciencbivalry weeps at recording, that he fin- tific subjects for three days without fatigue, ished his oration by giving the astonished and won immense applause from crowded asbeauty a box on the ear, sprung into bis semblies. From Padua he went to Mantua,

where there happened then to be a famous saddle, and gallopped forth from the gate. gladiator, who had foiled the best fencers in It was the Landgrave Albert of Thurin- | Europe, and lately killed three eminent fencgia, already a married man and who had ers in Mantua. Crichton offered to fight him long trained his favorite steed to this for 1500 pistoles, and to drive him out of Italy.

The Court attended the performance. Crichperilous exercise.-Russell's Travels.

ton at first stood upon the defensive, but soon

pushing his antagonist with vigor, he ran him BIOGRAPHICAL.

through the body in three places. He bestow

ed the prize, he had thus won, upon the widThe following sketch of the life and adven ows of the three men who had been slain by tures of Crichton, may appear fabulous to the gladiator. He became tutor to the Duke's those readers who are not familiar with his son who was of a dissolute habit of life.history, or the sources of our information. He While thus engaged, he wrote a comedy of blazed like a meteor for an hour, but was great merit in the representation of which he eclipsed too early to shed any lasting light on performed fifteen parts, and in such a manner the world, and his history is read as a matter that in every instance he appeared to be a of wonder and astonishment, rather than useful information or improvement. He receiv During the Carnival in Mantua, he was at. ed in his own day the epithet of “ Admira-tacked one night in the street by six persons ble," and posterity have never been disposed in masks, all of whom he repelled, and disto deny his just claim to that distinction. armed their leader who begged his life and in

JAMES CRICHTOn was born in the County || formed him that he was the Prince, his pupil. of Perth, in Scotland, in August, 1560, and Crichton begged pardon of the princt, and · boasted that he was sprung from the race of presented him with his own sword, which he Scottish Kings. He had scarcely arrived at took, and thus disarming Crichton, he ran him the age of twenty years, before he had run through the heart. The cause of this murder through the whole circle of the sciences, and was never known. He was killed in the twencould speak and write, to perfection, in the ty second year of his age. From the portraits different languages. He had also become high- ll which remain of him, he appears to have been ly improved in riding, dancing, singing and in beautiful and elegant in face and form : his all kinds of instrumental music. Thus ac- || body and limbs though not muscular and athcomplished, he went to Paris, where he caus- | letic, were well proportioned and fitted for ed placards to be fixed upon the gates of the feats of agility. University, inviting all who were skilled in any art or science to dispute with him in the

VARIETY. College of Navarre, that day six weeks, in any of twelve languages (naming them) and The influence of affection and propensity on this either in verse or prose. In the mean opinion and belief is finally illustrated by the time, he employed his time in field and mili- | following story. A fine lady and a curate tary sports, or in balls and musical parties, or were viewing the moon through a telescope. cards and other games. The disputation took | I perceive, said the lady, two shadows inclinplace, and continued from nine in the morn ing to each other ; they are certainly two baping till six in the evening, in which, in the py lovers. Not at all, replies the curate, they language of his biographer, “he acquitted || are two steeples of a Cathedral.-Kaimes.

different person.

[blocks in formation]

ARTFUL QUESTION.-Dominico, the barle

THE TALISMAN. quin, going to see Louis XIV. at supper, fixed his eye on a dish of partridges. The King who WORCESTER, SATURDAY, MAY 17, 1828. was fond of his acting, said, “Give that dish to Dominico." " And the partridges too sire?”

So little of interest has occurred since our last Louis penetrating his art, replied, “ And the that we have preferred occupying the space partridges too.” The dish was of gold. usually allotted to a summary of events, with

miscellaneous matter selected from works of a DANCING.–When Commodore Anson was popular character, rather than with any specat Canton, the officers of the ship Centurion || ulations of our own, Had we been inclined gave a ball. While they were dancing, a Chinese, who very quietly surveyed the operation, | for the next Presidential election would fur

to annoy our readers with politics, the contest said softly to one of the company, "why don't you let your servants do this?"

nish a constant supply of inflamatory materi

als. But as we disclaim any such intentions, WHITEFIELD.-Dr. Franklin, in his me

we presume our readers will be pleased with moirs, bears witness to the extraordinary effect

the substitute we have made. wbich was produced by Mr. Whitefield's preaching in America ; and relates an anec

MORAL SENTIMENTS. dote equally characteristic of the preacher and of himself. “I happened," says the doctor,

To insinuate a thing prejudicial to another, os to attend one of his sermons, in the course

which we are not willing openly to avow, is a of which I perceived he intended to finish with

kind of mental assassination. a collection, and I silently resolved he should || self alone in the open field, to examine his

He is a brave man who dares to meet himget nothing from me. I had in my pocket a handful of copper money, three or four silver heart, upinfluenced by the world. dollars, and five pistoles in gold. As he pro.

The love of money is an opiate, that often ceeded, I began to soften, and concluded to

lulls conscience asleep, and binds the judg.

ment in chains. give the copper. Another stroke of his oratory made me ashamed of that, and determined

They who are the least apt to offend, are me to give the silver and he finished so admi

the most ready to forgive. rably, that I emptied my pocket wholly into

In religious disquisitions, the tongue does the collector's dish, gold and all. At this ser

not always represent the mind. mon there was also one of our club, who, be

A man without discretion is like a ship ing of my sentiments respecting the building

without a helm. in Georgia, and suspecting a collection might be intended, had by precaution emptied his

Married, pockets before he came from home ; towards

In Lancaster, Mr. Joel Wilder, jun, to Miss the conclusion of the discourse, however, he Deborah H. Whitman. felt a strong inclination to give, and applied In Oxford, on the 4th inst, by the Rev. Mr. to a neighbor who stood near him to lend him

Maynard, Mr. Charles J. Westcoit, of Cranssome money for the purpose. The request was

ton, R. I. to Miss Melina Stone, of the former fortunately made to perhaps the only man in

place. the company who had the firmness not to be

In New Braintree, on the 5th iost. by Rev. affected by the preacher. His answer was, John Fiske, Mr. George Merriam, of Brook“at any other time, friend Hodgkinson, 1 field, to Miss Abigail Little, of New Braintree; would lend thee freely ; but not now, for thee

Mr. Augustus Makepiece, of Brookfield, to seems to be out of thy right senses."

Miss Nancy M. Gleason, of New Braintree;
Mr. Charles Wetherbee, of Brookfield, to Miss

Abigail H. Bartlett, of New Braintree; Mr. Some years ago, when the famous Dr. Leib

James Joslyn, to Miss Francis Pierce, both of was figuring in political life, prejudices were New Braintree. strong, and party feeling ran bigh-application In North Brookfield, by Rev. Thomas Snell, was made to the Legislature of Pennsylvania || Mr. John Wesion of New Braintree, to Miss to incorporate a "Life Insurance Company" Adaline Tidd of North Brookfield. for the term of fifty years. A zealous member rose and addressed Mr. Speaker with “Sir, I dont't like this bill, and I shan't vote for it.

Died, The petitioners have asked to be incorporated In this town, on the 28th ult. Mrs. Dolly to insure lives for fifty years, and what will Chadwick, wife of Mr. Isaac Chadwick, aged be the consequence of granting their prayer ? || 61. why, the first thing you'll know that devil of Io Cincinnati, Ohio,on the 22d ull. Ephraim a Dr. Leib, will get his life insured for the Wilder Fairbanks, of Oakham, aged 24. whole time, and we shall have him torment In Graston, on the 1st inst. Mrs. Lucy ing us for a half a century to come.”

Wheeler, wife of Martin Wheeler, aged 31.

POETRY.

DRUIDICAL CHORUS

On the landing of the Romans.
From the “Welsh Melodies," by Mrs. Hemans.

By the dread and viewless powers,
Whom the storms and seas obey,
From the dark Isle's mystic bowers
Romans! o'er the deep away.
Think ye 'tis but nature's gloom,
O'er our shadowy coast, that broods ?
By the altar and the tomb,
Shun these haunted solitudes.
Know ye Mona's awful spell?
She the rolling orbs can stay,
She the mighty grave compels
Back to yield its fetter'd prey.
Fear ye not the lightning's stroke?
Mark ye not the fiery sky?
Hence, around our central rock
Gods are gathering, Romans ily.

A MOTHER'S GIFT. Remember, love, who gave thee this,

When other days shall come : When she, who had thy earliest kiss,

Sleeps in her parrow home.
Remember ; twas a mother gave
The gift to one she'd died to save.
The mother sought a pledge of love,

The holiest for her son,
And from the gifts of God above,

She chose a goodly one.
She chose for her beloved boy,
The source of light, and life, and joy,
And bade him keep the gift,—that when

That parting hour would come, They might have hope to meet again,

In an eternal home.
She said his faith in that would be
Sweet incense to her memory.
And should the scoffer in his pride,

Laugh that fond faith to scorn,
And bid him cast the pledge aside,

That he from youth had borne,
She bade him pause, and ask his breast,
If he, or she had loved him best.
A Parent's blessing on her son

Goes with this lioly thing :
The love that would retain the one

Must to the other cling.
Remember! tis no idle toy,
A mother's gift-Remember, boy!

[ocr errors]

A TERRIBLE DISEASE.—66. How do you do, Jack?- What ails you man?" inquired a friend of Banister. "Oh? my dear fellow I have got a terrible billious disorder.' lodeed? I did not know before that you were subject to the bile.' • Bile? oh no, but I am so to a heap of bills which I can't pay, and if this be no billious disorder, pray what is ?'

THE SKY-LARK. Bird of the wilderness,

Blithesome and cumberless, Light be thy matin o'er moorland and lea!

Emblem of happiness!

Bless'd is thy dwelling-place!
O to abide in the desert with tbee.

TO THE PUBLIC. Subscriptions will be received by the subscrib

ers for the following Periodicals. Spirit of the Pilgrims, Boston, monthly, $3,00 Christian Spectator, New Haven, do. 3,00 Journal of Education, Boston, do. 4,00 Casket, Philadelphia,

do. 2,50 Boston Advertiser, 3 times a week 5,00 Boston Literary Gazette, weekly, 3,00 Bower of Taste, Boston, do.

2,50 Ladies Album, Philadelphia,

do.

2,50 Bachelor's Journal, Boston, do. 3,00 R. I. American, Providence, semiweekly, 3,50 Microcosm,

do. weekly, 2,00 Toilet

do.

do. 1,50 Ariel, Philadelphia, semi-monthly, 1,50 Guardian & Monitor, N. Haven, monthly 1,00 Liberal Preacher, Keene,

do. 1,00 American Evangelist, Boston,

do. Teacher's Guide, do.

do. 1,00 Clarion, Bangor,

weekly, 1,00 Juvenile Gazette, Providence, do.

,25 Youth's Friend, Philadelphia, monthly, Home Missionary, N. Y. do. 1,00

DORR & HOWLAND.

1,00

,25

Wild is thy lay and loud,

Far in the downy cloud;
Love gives it energy, love gave it birth.

Where, on the dewy wing,

Where art thou journeying? Thy lay is in heaven, thy love is on earth.

O'er fell and fountaip sheen,

O'er moor and mountain green, O’er the red streamer that heralds the day;

Over the cloudlet dim,

Over the rainbow's rim,
Musical cherub, hie, hie thee away.

Then when the gloaming comes,

Low in the heather-blooms, Sweet will thy welcome and bed of love be!

Emblem of happiness!

Bless'd is thy dwelling-place!
O to abide in the desert with thee!

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

were at

POPULAR TALES.

inclined to bend the purposes of others to hi!

own, while they were kept in ignorance of his THE STRANGE COMBAT. views. I have seen him fix bis eagle eye upIt was during the last war of this country

on a sailor, and require of him to look him with Great Britain, that circunstances led me

steadily in the face for five minutes, and then to be a passenger on board of one of our large dismiss him without a comment or a reason for merchantmer, in which I bad embarked what so doing : but I would bet my life almost that little property I possessed ; our seas

he had one. that time covered with small privateers be After skimming through the mist for two longing to both belligerents, who did more mis | days, (of which I have spoken) I happened to chief to the commerce of both nations, than be on the deck with Capt. I was in converthe several public armed vessels of either. sation with him, as to the probability of reachThey almost invariably eluded the pursuit of ing our port free form the enemies cruisers.the large frigates and ships of the line, by He replied with his usual brevity. the fog hauling sharp on the wind, when they discov. and carrying sail, alone will save us; I am a ered an enemy; and their peculiar schooner made man if we escape ; if not, I am ruined.' rig, and being built expressly for sailing, would

He said this in the same tone of voice that he give them a distinct advantage over their square

would have a common order-he looked up sailed enemies, in beating to windward. Again and said, sternly, there is a fog eater--at this their lighter draught of water, when near the

moment the sun seemed to flash upon our deck shore would frequently enable them to run so and the fog rose from the sea like the hoisting close in, that they could not be attacked un of a curtain at the Theatre,-a smart breeze less in boats; and every one who has ever

took us back, and before an order was given, read the account of that attack upon the pri

we saw directly under our lee, a little black vateer Neufchattel, by the boats of the Endym. | looking, sharp built, tall rigged, port bearing ion (I believe) which engagement happened schooner, whose decks were crowded with near Nantucket, will easily see how little force men, I know her,' ejaculated our captain : it requires to beat off boats, or sink them the next thing, there came a ball dancing aprevious to boarding. Be these things as they cross our bows in imitation of a distracted por. may, I return to my story. We had been sailpoise. Our captain took the helm from a sai. ing for two days with a good breeze, though lor, and gave orders to lay to.—Another shot now and then it would lull, and then we sag came within a few feet of the captain's head, ged heavily along through a fog, almost as and passed through the main-sail, which he dense as the waters which bore us.

seemed to regard as little as he would the flapWe were not far from our port, and our cap- ping of the wing of a sea-gull. But his countain was willing to crowd sail night and day, tenance grew dark and terrific— he had not a as the risk of capture was superior to that of | gun on board. The privateer braced sharp on shipwreck, or disaster from a crippling of our the wind, and at the second tack came within spars. Our ship was of about 400 tons, heav musket shot; a boat came on board and we ily laden and not a swist sailor. Her captain were ordered under the pigmey's lee, in the was a man of shrewd judgment, of inflexibility || style of an admiral in the British Navy. In of purpose, and rather given to taciturnity. - | the mean time the wind had freshened, and He was of a slight figure, gentlemanly to his the captain had privately given orders to have equals, decided and prompt to those under him every sail in readiness for instant setting. The in his orders, and in exaction of their fulfil. boat left us, and we bore down apparently for ment. His keen dark eyes, and naval officer the purpose of fulfilling the command which gait, showed a kind of courage, which one

had been given us.

To secure and pack my would call daring, if they had watched his papers was but the work of a moment, for an countenance on particular occasions. Yet at anticipation of the event of capture had placother times, he seemed rather to be the care ed me on my guard in this particular. When ful mariner who would reef for safety, when || I returned on deck, we were almost withir safety apparently did not require it. He was hail of the stranger, under a flowing sail ;one of those kind of men, who seemed to be which, in order to bring us to a proper luff un

« ZurückWeiter »