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arins soon.

destitute. We have received the first numTHE TALISMAN.

of the Bachelors Journal, a weekly paper printWORCESTER, SATURDAY, MAY 3, 1828.

ed by a singular kind of coiacidence, ai the Newspapers have so increased in our Coan

very office of the “ Bower of Taste." It is a try, that he must be fastidious indeed, who is

neat well printed sheet, and contains much not able to supply every demand of his taste. I original matter. We wish it great success but Every department of science, literature, poli

are apprehensive that it must soon be as harmtics and religion has its journals, and in the

less as a cannon without ammunition, or a gayer works of life, those of amusement and camp equipage without an army-Desertion intellectual entertainment, are to be found

will we doubt not steal away its ranks, and many periodicals of great merit. Our exchange their arch enemy, Cupid, will soon march into list has already become pretty extensive, and its dismantled works with flying clolors. our acknowledgements are due to too many to

SUMMARY. mention them all particularly.

Russia has declared war against Turkey, We cannot however pass by the “ Bower of || and we may expect much hard fighting, and Taste," ," by Mrs. Ware, without noticiog it, as

a good supply of news for the Papers. Russel it deserves. It is published every Saturday by

Jarvis recently committed a disgraceful outS. G. Andrews at $2,50 per annum. The rep

rage upon the private S-cretary of the Presiutation of the Edilress would be enough of it

dent, in the Capitol. The President has sent self to recommend it to patronage, even if its

a message, and Col, Jarvis has written a letintrinsic merits did not entitle it to favor. It

ter to Cungress on the subject. Congress had is a Bower where many a flower blooms, and

better meet like the old Polish Diets, armed; maoy a rich cluster tempts and gratifies the

for as things go on there, they will need their taste.

Gen. Macomb has been appointed We are glad to see the character which sim

Major General of the U. S. Army, in place of ilar publications are assuming. They seem to

the late Gen. Brown, deceased. The Tariff evince to the world, that tho' of a more deli

bill has passed the House of Representatives, cate structure, woman is in fact a rational be

by a vote of 105 to 94. It is said, the Senate ing, and has intellectual powers to be culti

will pass it in its present form. An attempt vated and refined by the ordinary means of || to limit the session of Congress to the 19th of communication and instruction. The time has || May, was not sustained, but the constitutionbeen when a Lady's Magazine, like most la

al limits, viz: the 4th of March, 1829, must dies Albums, was the most silly thing imagin- ll end their discussions. A family of eight perable. Their editors seemed to imagine that,

sons in Dutchess County, N. Y. arose one day in order to win favor, they must treat their

last week, all in a state of mental derangement. readers like Sultanas of the East, and feed them

A black man who has turned while, is exhibitwith sweet meats, and lull them to sleep on a

ing in Charleston, S. C. as an object of curious couch of roses by the dulcet notes of music, or

speculation for naturalists and medical men. please the eye with a painted bauble. The ill success of such publications, and the suc.

A most distressing accident occurred on cess and reputation of that of Mrs. Ware, and Wednesday last, at the laying of the corner of the Ladies' Magazine in Boston among oth- || stone of a Methodist Church in North Bennet ers, show how mistaken were such estimates of street, Boston. A foor had been laid over the female character.

cellar, and during the services, a brick pillar, The desideratum which was supplied by which supported a part of it, gave way, and those and similar publications, furnished to precipitated about two hundred people, who every age, sex and condition its appropriate were upon it, into the cellar: this was fifteen vehicle of information and amusement, except | feet deep. Twenty or twenty-five persons that odd unassimilating class of beings—the were very badly injured, and some of them, it Bachelors, who seem to stand like the lookers is feared, mortally. Fifty or sixty were slighton at a country ball, wondering and envying, || ly injured. --Some bad one, and several both while bappy faces and light hearts are dancing legs broken, and the death of one woman and before them. And now even they are no longer || child are already reported.

Thirdly, that Mr. Bradbury undertook to make i, and virtue, there is no office beyond the reach him a ready writer for the sum of one guinea ; of his honorable ambition.' and also to teach him how to make a pen, without any additional charge.--Fourthly, County, Virginia, September 24, 1755, and

Chief Justice Marshall was born in Fauquier that he went through his six lessons in writing, when Mr. Bradbury demanded his guinea. His father was a planter, of small property,

was the eldest of a family of fifteen children. Firthly, that he gave Mr. Bradbury a sovereign and a limited education, though of superior and a half-crown, desiring him to take his

natural endowments. The son labored under guinea therefrom.--Sixthly, that Mr. Bradbury instead of returning him one shilling and six. I great disadvantages in regard to his early ed

ucation. In 1775 he embarked in the Ameripence, returned him a sixpence only, stating he retained the extra shilling for stationary ;

can cause, when the revolutionary war broke

out, and in 1777 was promoted to the rank of this was the extortion' he complained of.Seventhly, that he remonstrated with Mr. Captaia in the continental army ; and was enBradbury on this stationary charge; and I gaged in many battles, particularly those of

Brandywine, Germantown, and Monmouth. moreover complained to bim that he had not

In 1780, the part of the army to which he was sufficiently instructed him in the art of making | attached, was dissolved, and he attended a a good pen.-Eighthly, that Mr. Bradbury

course of law lectures, and obtained license to

for he replied he would teach bim no more, had not conducted himself like a gentleman.-practise law. The next year he resigned his Ninthly, that he told Mr. Bradbury he should military commission, and carried into retiresummon him before the Lord Mayor. Tenth: officers. In 1783, he was married to Miss Am

ment the friendship and esteem of his fellowly, that Mr. Bradbury replied, that he cared | bler, a daughter of the Treasurer of Virginia. no more for the Lord Mayor or the Lord Horse

He was several times elected a member of the either, than he did for him ;-this was the •a

State Legislature, and was instrumental in asbuse he complained of.--Eleventhly, that, on

sembling the Convention in Philadelphia to his attempting to remonstrate farther, Mr. Bradbury got up from his desk, clenched his prepare a Constitution of Government for the fist, and told him if he did not walk off quiet- | Pendleton, Randolph, and Madison, he suc.

Union : and subsequently, in connexion with ly, he would • bundle him down stairs ; '--this || ceeded, in opposition to Patrick Henry, in obwas the assault he complained of; and havi taining the assent of Virginia to the adopțion ing stated all this, he respectfully submitted

of that Constitution. In 1796 he was invited that he had made out his case. " And pray, Sir,” asked the magistrate, "did

to accept the office of Attorney General of the he, in effect, "bundle' you down stairs?". "No, declined the appointment of Minister to France.

United States, but declined it; and soon after Sir,” replied the gentleman, “but I think he would if I had not walked away very rapidly." || cept the appointment of Envoy, jointly with

But the following year, he was induced to ac" Then, Sir, I am sorry I cannot accommodate Messrs Pinckney and Gerry, to the French you by interfering," rejoined his worship ;

Republic. He returned home in 1798, and “ if you had undergone the bundling operation,

soon after, at the solicitation of Gen. Washsomething might have been done, perhaps ; | ington, became a candidate for Congress, and but as it is, I don't see that you have any redress for your manifold grievances, except you retary of War; and shortly after, on the rup

was elected. In 1800 he was appointed Secsue him in the Court of Conscience for the re

ture between President Adams and Col. Pickcovery of the shilling's-worth of stationary ; || ering, he was appointed Secretary of State. and the issue of that measure, would, in my In January, 1801, he was appointed Chief opinion, be very doubtful."

Justice of the United States, and has ever since The gentleman looked at his worship, then at his own hat, then at his worship again, and creasing reputation and unsullied dignity. Al

held that office, performing its duties with inthen he slowly withdrew ; seemingly quite at

though in the seventy-third year of his age, a loss what to make of the matter.

his intellectual powers are uvimpaired, and Mornings at Bow-street.

his robust constitution yet seems fresh and

firm in a green old age.
BIOGRAPHICAL.

Married,
CHIEF JUSTICE MARSHALL.

In this town, by the Rev. Mr. Miller, Mr.

Henry Parker, of Millbury, to Miss Matilda, From the last January number of the North daughter of Dea. Moses Perry. American Review, we select the following In Greenwich, by the Rer. Mr. Bladgett, outline of the life of this distinguished man, Betsey, daughter of Dr. J.Cobb, of Greenwich.

Mr. Gardner Hunt, Jr. of New Salem, to Miss which, imperfect as it is, illustrates the correctness of an eloquent remark, that under our

Died, form of government, 'the poor map, while he

In Pinckneyville, (Mi.) March 20th John rocks his infant on his knees, may justly in M. son of James Wilson, Jr. Esq. in the second dulge the cousolation, that if he possess talents Il year of his age.

arins soon.

destitute. We have received the first numTHE TALISMAN.

of the Bachelors Journal, a weekly paper printWORCESTER, SATURDAY, MAY 3, 1828. ed by a singular kind of coincidence, ai the Newspapers have so increased in our Coun

very office of the “ Bower of Taste.” It is a try, that he must be fastidious indeed, who is

neat well printed sheet, and contains much not able to supply every demand of his taste. Il original matter. We wish it great success but Every department of science, literature, poli

are apprehensive that it must svon be as harmtics and religion has its journals, and in the

less as a cannon without ammunition, or a gayer works of life, those of amusement and camp equipage without an army-Desertion intellectual entertainment, are to be found

will we doubt not steal away its ranks, and many periodicals of great merit. Our exchange their arch enemy, Cupid, will soon march into list has already become pretty extensive, and its dismantled works with flying clolors. our acknowledgements are due to too many to

SUMMARY. mention them all particularly.

Russia has declared war against Turkey, We cannot however pass by the “. Bower of

and we may expect much hard fighting, and Taste,” by Mrs. Ware, without noticing it, as

a good supply of news for the Papers. Russel it deserves. It is published every Saturday by

Jarvis recently committed a disgraceful out8. G. Andrews at $2,50 per anpum. The rep- || rage upon the private S-cretary of the Presiutation of the Edilress would be enough of it- || dent, in the Capitol. The President has sent self to recommend it to patronage, even if its

a message, and Col, Jarvis bas written a letintrinsic merits did not entitle it to favor. It

ter to Congress on the subject. Congress had is a Bower where many a flower blooms, and

better meet like the old Polish Diets, armed ; many a rich cluster tempts and gratifies the

for as things go on there, they will need their taste.

Gen. Macomb has been appointed We are glad to see the character which sim

Major General of the U. S. Army, in place of ilar publications are assuming. They seem to

the late Gen. Brown, deceased. The Tariff evince to the world, that tho' of a more deli

bill has passed the House of Representatives, cate structure, woman is in fact a rational be

by a vote of 105 to 94. It is said, the Senate ing, and has intellectual powers to be culti

will pass it in its present form. An attempt vated and refined by the ordinary means of

to limit the session of Congress to the 19th of communication and instruction. The time has

May, was not sustained, but the constitutionbeen when a Lady's Magazine, like most la- || al limits, viz: the 4th of March, 1829, must dies Albums, was the most silly thing imagin

end their discussions. A family of eight perable. Their editors seemed to imagine that,

sons in Dutchess County, N. Y. arose nne day in order to win favor, they must treat th

last week, all in a state of mental derangement. readers like Sultanas of the East, and feed them

A black man who has turned while, is exhibitwith sweet meats, and lull them to sleep on a

ing in Charleston, S. C. as an object of curious couch of roses by the dulcet notes of music, or

speculation for naturalists and medical men. please the eye with a painted bauble. The ill success of such publications, and the suc A most distressing accident occurred on cess and reputation of that of Mrs. Ware, and Wednesday last, at the laying of the corner of the Ladies' Magazine in Boston among oth- stone of a Methodist Church in North Bennet ers, show how mistaken were such estimates of || street, Boston. A foor had been laid over the female character.

cellar, and during the services, a brick pillar, The desideratum which was supplied by which supported a part of it, gave way, and those and similar publications, furnished to precipitated about two hundred people, who every age, sex and condition its appropriate were upon it, into the cellar: this was fifteen vehicle of information and amusement, except || feet deep. Twenty or twenty-five persons that odd unassimilating class of beings—the were very badly injured, and some of them, it Bachelors, who seem to stand like the lookers is feared, mortally. Fifty or sixty were slighton at a country ball, wondering and envying, iy injured.-Some had one, and several both while bappy faces and light hearts are dancing legs broken, and the death of one woman and before them. And now even they are no longer child are already reported.

ORIGINAL POETRY.

COMMUNICATED FOR THE TALISMAN.

TO A SPRING FLOWER. Whence dost thou come?--It was but yesterday, And the brown field was clad in cheerless

gloom ; And winter lingering hush'd the jocund lay Of early birds ;--and flowers forgot to bloom, But now 'tis changed, -beauty is in the rale, And Meadows smile in their growo drapery, The robin's note is heard, the balmy gale Bursts the swoln buds on every forest tree. And yet, what magic touch has wrougbt this

change! The frost that seard thy leaves, and dimm'd

thy bloom, Has melted in the sunbeams; but how strange, That thou shouldst start to life, and burst thy

tomb! Is it the breathing south wind, that recalls Thy wasted beauty; or spring's morning beam, Or song of feather'd choir when evening falls, Or the wild murmer of the gushing stream? It is not thus with man.-The wasting form, And fading blush of beauty may, in vain, Court the wild breeze. The wiuter's chilly

storm That freezes life, yields not to spring again.-

I saw her droop, and like a lovely flower Nipp'd by untimely frost, she sunk to rest, And mid December's shows, when tempests

lower, They heap'd the clods above her infant breast. And spring came back, and n'er her little grave The breeze or evening sighed, and the wild bird Did carol o'er it, and the grass did wave In rich luxuriance--but 'twas all unheard, The flower I loved to tend-it came no more, And years have spread oblivior,wbere'twas laid Yet shall it bloom upon a happier shore, Where aa immortal Spring shall never fade.

X.

While I liv'd thy tales to hear,
Told by you on wintry hearth,
All to make your bliod boy mirth;
And I lov'd my voice to join
In chorus of those hymns divine,
By which you fondly taught your boy
To look to heaven with hope and joy.
Suo or moon I could not see,
But love measured time for me:
When your kiss my slumber broke,
Then I knew the morn had woke :
And when came the hour to pray,
Then I knew 'twas close of day ;
When I heard the loud winds blow,
And I felt the warm fire glow,
Then I knew twas winter wild,
And kept at home-your helpless child!
When the air grew mild and soft,
And the gay lark sang aloft ;
And I heard the streamlet flowing,
And I smelt the wild flower blowing,
And the bee did round me hum,
Then I knew the spring was come.
Forth I wandered with delight,
And I knew when days were bright,
When I climb'd the green hill's side,
Fancy trac'd the prospect wide ;
And 'twas pleasant when I press'd
The warm and downy turf to rest.
Now I never more shall roam,
The many paths around my home:
And you will often look in vain,
Nor hail your wanderer o'er again ;
Never more on tiptoe creep,
Where he lay as if asleep ;
Or with a low and plaintive moan,
Humming to himself alone,
On a bed of wild flowers stretch'd,
Starting when a kiss you snatch'd,
Till nature whisper'd 'twas my mother,
And affection gave another !
But 'tis sweeter thus to die,
With my tender mother by,
Than to be in life alone,
When she and every friend were gone.
Mourn pot o'er me broken hearted,
Not for long shall we be parted,
Soon in vales which ever bloom,
Which un/ading flowers perfume,
In realms of life, of light and joy,
You will meet your poor blind boy!

FROM THE LONDON " WORLD."

Men of genius make the most ductile hus bands; a fool has too much opinion of his dear sell, and too little of woman, to be easily gov. erped.

THE DYING BLIND BOY TO HIS MOTHER.

Mother, I am dying now,
Death's cold damps are on my brow !
Leave me not-each pang grows stronger,
Patient watch a little longer.
Sweet it is your voice to hear,
Though dull and heavy grows mine ear:
Wait and take my last adieu,
Never mother lov'd like you !
Though your form I ne'er might see,
Your image was not hid from me
Stamp'd on my adoring mind,
Beautiful but undefined;
Ever fair, and ever bright,
That vision fill'd me with delight.
Well I knew, what'er might be,
Those oft prais'd forms I could not see;
Might I all their beauty view,
None of them would rival you.
Life to me was sweet and dear,

WORCESTER TALISMAN. Published every other Saturday morning, by Dorr & HOWLAND, Worcester. (Mass.) at $1 a year, payable in advance.

B Agents paying five dollars will be enti. tled to receive six copies.

O Letters, intended for THE TALISMAN, must be post paid to insure attention.

GRIFFIN AND MORRILL....PRINTERS.

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THE

zatorttster Talisman.

NO. 4.

MAY 17, 1828.

VOL. I.

ORIGINAL TALE.

ed as the summer dew flies before the buroing

sun, and the smoke which now rises over the PEQUASSETT.

forest, is wafting her home to the Great SpirOn the morning succeeding the bloody con it. She shall chase the deer no more, nor flict with the Aborigipes, and the conflagration bring back the barbed arrow to Pequassett's of their fortress by Capt. Church, commonly faithful bow. Her nimble fingers shall string designated by the appellation of the “swamp | the beads no more. She shall not sharpen his fight," one solitary Indian, who had escaped arrows por weave the quills of the quiver and the almost universal destruction, came forth the moccason.

But is he stil! alone? from the ambush to which he had fled for shelt- || Where are the tendrils that had sprung from er, and was seen slowly and solemnly walking the parent tree? they whose tracks were feetamid the remains of the carnage of the preced er than their father's to tire the roe-buck? ing day. The sun had just broken the dim gates Where are they who were coming up. in of the winter morning, and looked out upon | strength? whose arms were to be mighty against the still smoking embers with a feeble eye. the Yangees? They too have gone from their He looked coldly upon that scene--wheu he father. They shall lie down with the Raven saw the mapgled and burning remains of a Hair in their long homes. Their feet no more thousand beings, who but two short journeys shall press the forest. Their bows shall no before, were revelling in supposed security, i longer be drawn with Pequassett's. The rabmingled together, in one unsightly mass. bit shall not start before them, or feel the Rivers of blood had flown from hearts bearing | might of their little arms. But why are they high in youthful vigor and in aged enjoyment, il gore?" The fiery spirit again began to arouse and lost themselves in the “ bowels of the in his bosom. “ Have not Pequassett's foes earth.” And yet, farther down towards the sent to the Great Spirit those who were his blaze of the knoll, where the servid heat of the life? Have not the Yangees come from conflagration had not mingled it with its va. the rising sun to destroy his brethrea?... But, tive waters, the deep piles of crimson snow shall he slumber while the foe is at work? still retained out too deep a memento of the Shall the lion sleep while the tyger is destroyhavoc which they had seen. Pequassett looking his young? No, the children of Minqueed mournfully upon the theatre of destruction, sha's son call for revenge. The sinews of this where friend and foe, Christian and Indian, || arm shall bring atonement for their blood. The countryman and alien, lay slumbering in ash wolf tires before the hound, and the tyger ites, undistinguishably blended together. He self sinks exhausted in the chase, but these was sorrowful. It seemed as if the maply spir- limbs shall not weaken, nor these feet flee ait which had burned within him had been up-way.” He stooped to the ground, and slowly rooted by the tempest. His dark brow was lifting the slight remains of a victim, whose covered, the bow had fallen from his sinewy ornaments were like those of her for whom he arm, and the quiver had been upstrung and mourned, he exclaimed, “she has gone, and taken from his shoulders. He slowly paced a. shall Pequassett go forever unrevenged ?" He mong the relics of the departed, as in search | dropped the scorched arm, and assuming the of some hidden treasure. His melancholy de-defying position which is taken when the shrill meanor depicted the feelings of his heart. war-whoop is given, he continued; "No, I Tbere was a torrent of grief overflowing his swear by the blood her whose heart was bosom, and no longer capable of quelling its once with this, to dip my feathered arrows in troubled waves--he gave loose to them in the hearts of the Yapgees. Their blood must words. “ Pequassett is mournfulithe joys heal these wounds. These arrows shall mock which cheered his days have departed. He is the flight of the eagle,and this arm the strength alone, like the stricken deer in the forest. But of the Big Bear beyond the waters. Pequaswhere is she of the Raven Hair? she whose sett's life is worthless-a grain of sand mingdark eyes were shielded with the silken lasb? led with golden dust. He has no friends to seshe whose hands wove the shells of Pequas- cure, or by whom to be succored, and while sett's wampum, and dressed the beaver which the blood of his veins continues to warm him fell before his arrows?-The maid has depari- and to give him strength, the foe shall feel

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