An Anglo-Catholic's Thoughts on Religion

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1924 - 206 Seiten
 

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Seite 142 - He has his eyes on all his company ; he is tender towards the bashful, gentle towards the distant, and merciful towards the absurd ; he can recollect to whom he is speaking; he guards against unseasonable allusions or topics which may irritate ; he is seldom prominent in conversation, and never wearisome.
Seite 143 - He is at home in any society, he has common ground with every class ; he knows when to speak and when to be silent ; he is able to converse, he is able to listen ; he can ask a question pertinently, and gain a lesson seasonably...
Seite 10 - For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground : he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him. Like as many were astonied at thee (his visage was so marred more than any man, and his form more than the sons of men), so shall he sprinkle [marg.: startle] many nations ; kings shall shut their mouths at [marg.
Seite 143 - ... of a mind which lives in itself, while it lives in the world, and which has resources for its happiness at home when it cannot go abroad. He has a gift which serves him in public, and supports him in retirement, without which good fortune is but vulgar, and with which failure and disappointment have a charm. The art which tends to make a man all this is in the object which it pursues as useful as the art of wealth or the art of health, though it is less susceptible of method, and less tangible,...
Seite 70 - O, thou undaunted daughter of desires ! By all thy dower of lights and fires, By all the eagle in thee, all the dove, By all thy lives and deaths of love, By thy large draughts of intellectual day...
Seite 19 - The King to Oxford sent a troop of horse, For Tories own no argument but force ; With equal skill to Cambridge books he sent, For Whigs admit no force but argument.
Seite 64 - Thenceforward, what I saw, Was not for words to speak, nor memory's self To stand against such outrage on her skill. As one, who from a dream awaken'd, straight, All he hath seen forgets; yet still retains Impression of the feeling in his dream...
Seite 201 - Come, my people, Enter thou into thy chambers, And shut thy doors about thee : Hide thyself as it were for a little moment, 15 Until the indignation be overpast.
Seite 142 - The true gentleman in like manner carefully avoids whatever may cause a jar or a jolt in the minds of those with whom he is cast...
Seite 51 - LORD, I have fasted, I have prayed, And sackcloth has my girdle been, To purge my soul I have essayed With hunger blank and vigil keen. O God of mercy ! why am I Still haunted by the self I fly ?" Sackcloth is a girdle good, O bind it round thee still ; Fasting, it is Angels...

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