geological explorations

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Seite 3 - Honorary member of the American Philosophical Society, and of the Academy of Natural Sciences, &c.
Seite 68 - China and the peculiarly favorable conditions which exist for their expansion in the normal course of trade, I refer to the communication addressed to the Speaker of the House of Representatives by the Secretary of the Treasury on the...
Seite 174 - ... of the observer. The downward crush of the horizontal rocks is of itself sufficient to prove the fact that it is a case of upthrow. of Coal-beds and Marine Limestones ; — Theory of the Origin of the Coal Strata ; and in this the pulsating earthquake and tidal wave idea is most ingeniously used to account for the killing of each coal bed and its burial under a sandstone roof.* The change from Bituminous to Anthracite is then explained in some paragraphs. — On Gradation in the proportion of...
Seite 172 - ... estuaries in one quarter and the lakes in the other, to strew a portion of the older drift bordering all those basins in wide dispersion upon the top of the more tranquil sediments; but if such a pulsation of the crust were accompanied with successive paroxysmal liftings of wide tracts of the land, then the inundation would take the form of stupendous currents, the strewing power of which would be adequate to any amount of superficial transportation, even to the remote transportation of the larger...
Seite 19 - The history of this spring is not distinctly known. The Indians were well acquainted with it, and a square mile around it is still reserved for the Senecas. As to the geological origin of the spring, it can scarcely admit of a doubt that it rises from beds of bituminous coal below. At what depth we know not, but probably far down. The formation is doubtless connected with the bituminous coal of the neighboring counties of Pennsylvania and of the west rather than with the anthracite beds of the central...
Seite iii - WILSON, MD, Clearfield. Hon. DANIEL J. MORRELL, - Johnstown. HENRY W. OLIVER, Pittsburg. SAMUEL Q. BROWN, Pleasantville. SECRETARY OF THE BOARD JOHN B. PEARSE, Philadelphia. STATE GEOLOGIST PETER LESLEY, ------ Philadelphia.
Seite 30 - ... connection or comparison with other formations in the United States, and of the rest of the world ; the fossils they contain — their nature, positions and associations, and particularly the uses to which they can be applied in the arts, and their subserviency to the comforts and conveniences of man. " To effect these desirable objects, its members promise to contribute their individual exertions, and to use their influence to have the State geologically surveyed, to assist in making a State...
Seite 116 - ... carefully. Such material as existed was given to Lesley that he might construct the map. He has described the process, how the county lines were forced into adjustment from both ends of the state to the Susquehanna river, where the total error accumulated; this gross error was distributed backward east and west over the whole state "so that the fundamental skeleton of the map was 'tempered' like a pianoforte, being erroneous throughout, but with the local errors reduced to a minimum.
Seite 20 - I cannot learn that any considerable part of the large quantity of petroleum used in the Eastern States under the name of Seneca Oil comes from the spring now described. I am assured that its source is about one hundred miles from Pittsburgh, on the Oil Creek which empties into the Allegheny river in the township and County of Venango. It exists there in great abundance, and rises in purity to the surface of the water. By dams enclosing certain parts of the river...
Seite 12 - New Haven for Mauch Chunk, and he describes what he saw there and at the Beaver Meadow mines in article 1, Vol. XIX of his Journal; giving a curious lithograph picture of the state in which the Summit Mine then was, with an area of eight acres, and two or three stopes around the wall, " exactly as in a stone quarry." It had much the " appearance of a vast fort, of which the central area is the parade ground, and the upper escarpment is a platform for the cannon. The greatest ascertained thickness...

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