Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community

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Simon and Schuster, 07.08.2001 - 541 Seiten
10 Rezensionen
BOWLING ALONE warns Americans that their stock of "social capital", the very fabric of their connections with each other, has been accelerating down. Putnam describes the resulting impoverishment of their lives and communities.
Drawing on evidence that includes nearly half a million interviews conducted over a quarter of a century in America, Putnam shows how changes in work, family structure, age, suburban life, television, computers, women's roles and other factors are isolating Americans from each other in a trend whose reflection can clearly be seen in British society. We sign 30 percent fewer petitions than we did ten years ago. Membership in organisations- from the Boy Scouts to political parties and the Church is falling. Ties with friends and relatives are fraying: we're 35 percent less likely to visit our neighbours or have dinner with our families than we were thirty years ago. We watch sport alone instead of with our friends.
A century ago, American citizens' means of connecting were at a low point after decades of urbanisation, industrialisation and immigration uprooted them from families and friends. That generation demonstrated a capacity for renewal by creating the organisations that pulled Americans together. Putnam shows how we can learn from them and reinvent common enterprises that will make us secure, productive, happy and hopeful.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - ddonahue - LibraryThing

The present withdrawal of the individual from social organizations now resembles the situation after WW I as depicted in Chapter IX of Eckstein's Rites of Spring, in which he describes veteran's eschewal of social commitments. Vollständige Rezension lesen

LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - bkinetic - LibraryThing

The data Putnam collected and analyzed represents a major achievement. Yet, after doing all that hard work he failed to go very far down some paths his data showed him. For example, more Americans are ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

CONTENTS THINKING ABOUT SOCIAL CHANGE IN AMERICA
15
TRENDs IN CIVIC ENGAGEMENT AND SOCIAL CAPITAL
29
Civic Participation
48
Religious Participation
65
Connections in the Workplace
80
Informal Social Connections
93
Altruism Volunteering and Philanthropy
116
Reciprocity Honesty and Trust
134
Education and Childrens Welfare
296
Safe and Productive Neighborhoods
307
Economic Prosperity
319
Health and Happiness
326
Democracy
336
CHAPTER 22 The Dark Side of Social Capital
350
WHAT Is TO BE DONE?
365
Lessons of History The Gilded Age and
367

Against the Tide? Small Groups Social Movements
148
WHY?
159
Introduction
183
Pressures of Time and Money
189
Mobility and Sprawl
204
Technology and Mass Media
216
From Generation to Generation
247
What Killed Civic Engagement? Summing Up
277
Introduction
287
Toward an Agenda for Social Capitalists
402
Measuring Social Change
415
Sources for Figures and Tables
425
The Rise and Fall of Civic and
437
NOTES
445
THE STORY BEHIND THIS BOOK
505
INDEX
515
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Über den Autor (2001)

Robert D. Putnam is the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard. He is currently president of the American Political Science Association, fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the author of nine previous books. He lives in Lexington, Massachusetts. To learn more about Bowling Alone and ways to help rebuild our nation's social capital, visit the author's Web sites at www.bowlingalone.com and www.bettertogether.org

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