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colon Tristrophon ; but if it returns after four lines, it is called Tricolon Tetraftrophon; as when after two greater dactylic alcaic verses are fubjoined an archilochian iam. bic and a lesser dactylic alcaic, which is named the Car. men Horatianum, or Horatian verse, because frequently used by Horace; thus,

rtus recludens immeritis mori Cælum, negatâ tentat iter viâ; Cætusque vulgares, et udam

Spernit humum fugiente penna.

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Any one of these parts of a poem, in which the differ. ent kinds of verse are comprehended, when taken by itself, is called a Strophe, Stanza, or Staff

DIFFERENT kinds of Verse in Horace and BUCHANAN.

Ill. 30

I. Odes and PSALMS of one kind of Verse.
1. Afclepiadean, See No 3, page 272. Hor. I. 1. IV. 8.

-Buch. Pf. 28, 40, 80. 2. Choriambic Alcaic Pentameter, consisting of a spondee, three choriambuses, and a pyrrychius or jambus : Hor. I. II. 18. IV. 10.

3. Lambic trimeter, No 11.-Hor. Epod. 17.-Buch. Pl. 25, 94, 106.

4. Hexameter, No 1. Hor. Satyres and Epistles.Buch. PL. 1, 18, 45, 78, 85, 89, 104, 107, 132, 135.

5. Iambic Diměter, No 12.-Buch. Pf. 13, 31, 37, 47, 52, 54, 59, 86, 96, 98, 117, 148, 149, 150.

6. The Greater Dažylic Alcaic, No 8.-Buch. Pf. 26, 29, 32, 49, 61, 71, 73, 143.

7. Trochaic, consisting of seven trochees and a syllable ; admitting also a tribrachys in the uneven places,.i. e. in the first, third, fifth, and seventh foot; and in the even places, a tribrachys, spondee, dactyle, and anapeftus, Buch. Pr. 105, 119, 124, 129.

8. Anapestic, confisting of four anapestuses, admitting also a fpondee or dactyle; and in the last place, sometimes a tribrachys, amphimăcer, or trochee.--Ps. 113.

9. Anacreontic lambic, confifting of three iambuses, and -a syllable ; in the first foot it has fometimes a spondee or anapeftus, and also a tribrachys.-Pf. 131.

IL. Opes and Psalms of two kinds of verse following one another alternately,

1. Glyconian and Asclepiadean, No 4. and 3.-Hor. I. 3, 73, 19, 36. III. 9, 15, 19, 24, 25, 28. IV. 1, 3.Buch. Pf. 14, 35, 43.

2. Every first line (Dadylico-Trochaic,) consisting of the first four feet of an hexameter verse, then three tro. chees or a fpondee for the last ; every second verse (lam. bic Archilochian) confisting of an iambus or fpondæus, an iambus, a cæsura, and then three trochees. Hor. I. 4.

3. The first line, Hexameter, and the second, Alcmanian Daaylic, consisting of the four last feet of an hexameter. Hor. I. 7, 28. Epod. 12. -Buch. Pf.

4, UIT. 4. Every first line, Aristophanic, consisting of a chori. ambus, and bacchius or amphimacer : Every second line, Chorianıbic Alcaic, confifting of epitrītus secundus, two choriambufes, and a bacchius. Hor. I. 8.

5. The first line, (Trochaic,) consisting of three trochees and a cæsura ; or of an amphimacer and two iambuses. The second line, Archilochian lambic, No 9. Hor. lI. 18.

6. The first line, Hexameter ; the second (Daxylic Ar. cbilochian,) two dactyles and cæsura. Hor. IV. 7. Buch. Pf. 12.

7. The first line, lambic Trimeter; and the second, lambic Dimeter, No 11.-Hor. Epod. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,

-Buch. Pf. 3, 6, 10, 21, 22, 27, 34, 38, 39, 41, 44, 48, 53, 62, 74, 76, 79, 87, 92, 110, 112, 115, 120, 127, 133, 134, 139, 141.

8. The first line, lambic Dimeter ; the second ( Sapphic, confifts of two dayles, a cæsura, and four iambuses, ad.

10.

ter.

mitting also a spondeus, &c. But this verse is commonly divided into two parts; the first, the latter part of a pentameter, No 2. and the second, iambic dimeter, No 11. Hor. Epod. u. 9. The first line, Hexameter ; the second, lambic Dimè. Hor. Epod. 14, 15:

Buch. Pf. 81. 10. Hexameter, and Tambic Trimeter. Hor. Epod. 16. Buch. Pf. 2, 20, 24, 57, 60, 69, 83, 93, 95, 97, 108, 109, 118, 126, 136, 147.

1. The first line, Sapphic, No 5. and the second lambic Dimeter, No 11. Buch. Pf. 8.

12. Sapphic and Glyconian. Buch. PL. 33, 70, 121, 142.

13. Iambic Trimeter and Pentameter. Bach. Pf. 36, 63.

14. The first line, Hexameter; and the second line, the three last feet of an hexameter, with a long syllable or two short fyllables before. Buch. Pl. 68.

15. Hexameter and Pentameter, or Elegiac verse. Buch. Pf. 88, 114, 137:

16. The firit line, (Trochaic,) three trochees and a fyllable, admitting sometimes a spondee, tribrachys, &c, The second line, lambic Dimeter, No 11. Buch. Pf. 100.

III. Opss and Psalms of two kinds of verse, and three

or four lines in each stanza.

1. The three first lines, Sapphic, and the fourth, Adoni. an, NO 5.

Hor. Carm. I. 2, 10, 12, 20, 22, 25, 30, 32, 38. II. 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16. III. 8, 11, 14, 18, 20, 22, 27. IV. 2, 6, II,

Carmen Secul.-Buch. Pf. 5, 17, 51, 55, 65, 67, 72, 90, 101, 103.

2. The three first lines, Asclepiadëan, and the fourth, Glyconian. Hor. Carm. I. 6, 15, 24, 33. II. 12. III. 10, 16. IV. 5, 12. Buch. Pf. 23, 42, 75, 99, 102, 144:

3. The two first lines, Ionic trimeter, consisting of three Ionici minores; the third line, Ionic tetrameler, having öne Ionicus minor more. Hor. 111. 12.

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4. The two first lines have four trochées, admitting, in the second foot, a spondee, dactyle, &c. The third line, the same ; only wanting a syllable at the end. Buch. Pf. 66.

The three firat lines, Glyconian, No 4. admitting also a spondee or iambus in the first foot; the fourth line, Pberecratian, No 6. Buch. Pf. 116, 122, 128.

IV. Odes and Psalms of three kinds of verse, and three

or four lines in each stanza.

1. The two first lines, Asclepiadean, No 3. the third line, Pherecratian, No 6. and the fourth, Glyconian, No 4. Hor. Carm. I. 5, 14, 21, 23. III. 7, 13. IV. 13.-Buch. Pr. 9, 64, 84, 130.

2. The first two lines, the Greater Dadylic Alcais, N 8. The third, Archilochian lambic, No 9. The fourth, the Leser Alcaic, No 10. Hor. Carm. I. 9, 16, 17, 26, 27, 29, 31, 34, 35, 37. II. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 20. III. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 17, 21, 23, 26, 29. IV. 4, 9, 14, 15. Buch. Pr. 7, 11, 15, 19, 30, 46, 50, 56, 58, 77, 82, 91, 123, 125, 140, 146.

3. The first line, Glyconian ; the fecond, Asclepiadean; the third a spondee, three choriambuses, and an iambus or pyrrhichius. Buch. Pf. 16.

4. The first line, Hexameter ; the second, lambic dimeter ; and the third, two dactyles and a fyllable ; Hor. Epod. 13. Buch. Pl. 138. Sometimes the two laft verses are joined in one, or inverted; as, Buch. Pr. 145.

ENGLISH VERSE.

The quantity of syllables in English Verse is not precisely ascertained. With regard to this we are chiefly directed by the car. Our monosyllables are generally either long or short, as occasion requires. And in words of two or more fyllables, the accented syllable is always Jong.

Of English verse there are two kinds, one named Rhyme, and the other Blank verse.

In rhyme the lines are usually connected two and two, fometimes three and three in the final syllables. Two lines following one another thus connected, are called a Couplet, three lines, a Triplet,

In blank verfe fimilarity of found in the final fyllables is carefully avoided.

In meafuring most kinds of English verse, we find long and short fyllables succeeding one another alternately ; and therefore the accents should rest on every second fyl. lable.

The feet by which Englifh verse is commonly measured, are either lambic, i. e. consisting of a short and a long fyllable; as, aloft, crčāte; or Trochaic, i. e. confifting of a long and a short fyllable; as, bölg, lofti. - In verses of the former kind the accents are to be placed on the even fyl. Jables ; in the latter, on the odd syllables. But the mea. fure of a verse in English is most frequently determined by its number of fyllables only, without dividing them into particular feet.

1. TAMBIC MEASURE comprises verses,

1. Of four, Syllables, or of two feet; as,

With ravish'd ears,

The monarch hearș. Drydere 2. Of lex syllables, or of three feet; as,

Aloft in awful state,

The godlike hero fat. Dryden 3. Of eight syllables, or of four feet; as,

While dangers hourly round us rise,

No caution guards us from surprise. Fran. Horare. 4. Of ten sellables, or of five feet, which is the common measure of heroic and tragic poetry ; as, '

Poetic fields encompass me around,
And still I seem to tread on Classic ground;
For here the muse so oft her harp has strung,
That not a mountain rears its head unsung Addifotos

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