The flower, fruit and kitchen garden, by practical gardeners and florists

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Seite 40 - ... grass. But it is by no means advisable to carry the system of cropping with vegetables to such an excess as is frequently done. If the bare expense of cultivating the ground, and the rent, be paid, by such cropping, it should be considered enough. As the trees begin to produce fruit, begin also...
Seite 353 - As it has been the inclination of kings and the choice of philosophers, so it has been the common favourite of public and private men; a pleasure of the greatest, and the care of the meanest; and indeed an employment and a possession for which no man is too high nor too low.
Seite 138 - ... tenderness, should be kept dry after the foliage is decayed, until within about a month of their period of regerminating ; at which time they should, after having been deprived of their surplus offsets, be repotted in good fresh earth. There are some descriptions of bulbous and tuberous roots that need not be taken up oftener than once in two or three years, and then only to deprive them of the young offsets, and to manure the ground.
Seite 349 - The paper is next dipped into a solution of nitrate of silver, (the degree of concentration of which is not mentioned,) and dried without artificial heat in a room from which every ray of light is carefully excluded. By this process, it acquires a very remarkable facility in being blackened on a very slight exposure...
Seite 336 - Broccolis through the winter, it is always best to take up part of all the last nine sorts in the beginning of November, disturbing the roots as little as possible, and lay them in slopingly with their heads towards the north, only a few inches above the ground, and about eighteen inches asunder. By this means the crown of the plant lying low, is soon covered and protected by the snow which generally falls previously to long and severe frosts ; the plant is also rendered tougher in fibre, and hardier...
Seite 162 - From this time the fluid becoming more expanded every hour, its ascent is simultaneously increased in force and velocity. The vessels in the branches being filled to repletion, the buds quickly open, and shoots and leaves rapidly protrude. " The leaves attract the sap as soon as it reaches their vicinity, and, by one of the most wonderful processes that can be conceived, the result of exquisite organization, elaborate and prepare it, and render it fit for the nourishment of all the parts of the plant.
Seite 22 - ... the top of each should be broad and well rounded, the ground colour of the flower at the bottom of the cup should be clear white, or yellow, and the various rich-coloured stripes, which are the principal ornament of a fine Tulip, should be regular, bold, and distinct on the margin, and terminate in fine broken points, elegantly feathered, or pencilled.
Seite 256 - ... the same kind of crop, but that one kind of produce is cultivated on a piece of ground one year, and is succeeded by some other kind ; which practice, in part, constitutes the important system of rotation of crops. Not, however, to refer to matters extra-horticultural, it is notorious that an apple orchard will not immediately succeed upon the site of an old orchard of the same kind of fruit, and that no amount of manuring will enable it to succeed ; a wall border, in which fruit trees have been...
Seite 221 - ... of leaves, absorb a considerable quantity of nourishment from the atmosphere, and when ploughed in at the end of two years, the decay of their roots and leaves affords manure for the wheat crop; and at this period of the course, the woody fibre of the farm-yard manure, which contains the...
Seite 314 - Contrary, however, to my expectations the peach-tree maintained, at the end of two years, the most healthy and luxuriant appearance imaginable, and produced fruit in the last season in greater perfection than I had ever previously been able to obtain it. Some seedling plants had then acquired, at eighteen months old, (though the whole of their roots had been confined to half a square foot of mould,) more than eleven feet in height with numerous branches, and have afforded a most abundant and vigorous...

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