The River War: An Account of the Reconquest of the Sudan

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Courier Corporation, 07.03.2012 - 432 Seiten
"Churchill's first major historical work is still considered one of his most riveting." — Library Journal
"It's a great read." — The Washington Examiner
A story of heroism and glory that rivals any work of fiction, this instructive treatise on a Middle Eastern conflict was written by one of history's greatest figures. In The River War, Winston Churchill recounts a critical but often overlooked episode from the days when the British Empire was at the height of its power: the operations directed by Lord Kitchener of Khartoum on the Upper Nile from 1896 to 1899, which led to England's reconquest of the Egyptian Sudan.
After the 1881 rebellion of the Mahdi had plunged the Sudan into chaos, British attempts to withdraw from the region climaxed in General Gordon's ill-fated attempt to rescue officials, soldiers, and Egyptian subjects from Khartoum. A decade later, the British government began its efforts in the pacification and restoration of the Sudan--a mission that succeeded within two years, at the final battle of Omdurman.
Churchill was present at this decisive battle, and he wrote this book while he was still a young cavalry officer. In addition to the future statesman's views of the conflicts and the politics behind them, it shows how the River War altered the fates of England, Egypt, and the Arabian people of northeast Africa. Illustrated by 22 maps and plans, this treatise offers valuable insights into a historic clash of Western and Arabic cultures.
 

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Über den Autor (2012)

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill is best remembered as the Prime Minister of Great Britain during World War II. He served his country in a variety of ways, holding many high offices of state under four different prime ministers, as a member of Parliament for more than 60 years, and for serving two terms as prime minister. He was born at Blenheim Palace on November 30, 1874, and educated at Harrow and Sandhurst. His military service included periods spent in Cuba, India, the Sudan, and in France during World War I. Churchill's writing career began with pieces written for British newspapers while in the military. Some of his most famous works include Marlborough, a four-volume biography of his ancestor, the 1st Duke of Marlborough; The World Crisis, a four-volume history of World War I; The Second World War, a six-volume history; and A History of the English Speaking Peoples, a six-volume work was completed toward the end of his life. In 1953, Churchill received the Nobel Prize for Literature, in recognition of his extensive writing as well as for his speeches throughout a long, distinguished career as a statesman. That same year, Queen Elizabeth II knighted Winston Churchill. Winston Churchill died on January 24, 1965, at the age of 70.

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