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Around his temples spreads his golden wing,
And thus the flattering dream deceives the king :

Canst thou, with all a monarch's cares opprest, 25
Oh Atreus. fon! canst thou indulge thay rest :-
Ill fits a chief who mighty nations guides,
Directs in council, and in war presides,
To whom its safety a whole people owes,
To waste long nights in indolent repose.
Monarch, awake! 'tis Jove's command I bear ;
Thou, and thy glory, claim his heavenly care.
In just array draw forth th' embattled train,
Lead all thy Grecians to the dusty plain ;
Ev'n now, o king ! 'tis given thee to destroy 35
The lofty towers of wide-extended Troy.
For now no more the Gods with Fate contend,
At Juno's suit the heavenly factions end.
Destruction hangs o'er yon devoted wall,
And nodding Ilion waits th' impending fall..

40 Awake, but waking this advice approve, And trust the vision that descends from Jove.

The phantom said ; then vanish'd from his fight, Resolves to air, and mixes with the night. A thousand schemes the monarch's mind employ ; 45 Elate in thought, he sacks untaken Troy : Vain as he was, and to the future blind; Nor faw what Jove and secret Fate design'd, What mighty toils to either host remain, What scenes of grief, and numbers of the slain ! Eager he rises, and in fancy hears The voice celestial murmuring in his ears.

so

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First on his limbs a slender vest he drew,
Around him next the regal inantle threw;
Th’ embroider'd sandals on his feet were tied ;
The starry faulchion glitter'd at his fide;
And last his arm the maffy sceptre loads,
Unstain'd, immortal, and the gift of Gods.
Now rosy morn ascends the court of Jove,
Lifts

up her light, and opens day above.
The king dispatch'd his heralds with commands
To
range

the

camp and fummon all the bands :
The gathering hosts the monarch's word obey;
While to the feet Atrides bends his way.
In his black ship the Pylian prince he found;
There calls a senate of the Peers around :
Th' assembly plac'd, the king of men exprest
The counsels labouring in his artful breast :

Friends and confederates ! with attentive ear
Receive my words, and credit what

you

hear.
Late as I slumber*d in the shades of night,
A dream divine appear'd before my sight;
Whose visionary form like Nestor came,
The same in habit, and in mien the same.
The heavenly phantom hover'd o'er

my

head,
And, dost thou sleep, Oh Atreus' son ? (he faid)
Ill fits a chief who mighty nations guides,
Directs in council, and in war presides,
To whom its safety a whole people owes ;
To waste long nights in indolent repose.
Monarch, awake! 'tis Jove's command I bear,
Thou and thy glory claim his heavenly care.

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In just array draw forth th' embattled train,
And lead the Grecians to the dusty plain ;
Ev'n now, O king! 'tis given thee to destroy
The lofty towers of wide-extended Troy.
For now no more the Gods with Fate contend,
At Juno's fuit the heavenly factions end.
Destruction hangs o'er yon devoted wall,
And nodding Ilion waits th' impending fall.
This hear observant, and the Gods obey !
The vision spoke, and past in air away.
Now, valiant chiefs ! since Heaven itself alarms;
Unite, and rouze the sons of Greece to arms.
But first with caution try what yet they dare,
Worn with nine years of unsuccessful war!
To move the troops to measure back the main,
Be mine; and your's the province to detain.

He spoke, and fat; when Nestor rising said,
(Nestor, whom Pylos' sandy realms obey'd) Ioa
Princes of Greece, your faithful ears incline,
Nor doubt the vision of the Powers divine ;
Sent by great Jove to him who rules the hoft,
Forbid it Heaven ! this warning should be loft !
Then let us haste, obey the God's alarms,
And join to rouse the sons of Greece to arms.

Thus spoke the fage : the kings without delay
Diffolve the council, and their chief obey:
The sceptred rulers lead; the following host
Pour'd forth by thousands, darkens all the coast.
As from some rocky cleft the shepherd sees
Cluftering in heaps on heaps the driving bees,

Rolling,

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Rolling, and blackening, swarms succeeding swarms, With deeper murmurs and more hoarse alarms; Dusky they spread, a close embody'd crowd,

I15 And o'er the vale descends the living cloud. So, from the tents and ships, a lengthening train Spreads all the beach, and wide o’ershades the plain : Along the region runs a deafening found ; Beneath their footsteps groans the trembling ground. Fame flies before, the messenger of Jove, And shining foars, and claps her wings above. Nine facred heralds now, proclaiming loud The monarch's will, suspend the listening crowd. Soon as the throngs in order rang'd appear, 125 And fainter murmurs dy'd upon the ear, The King of Kings his awful figure rais’d; High in his hand the golden sceptre blaz'd: The golden sceptre, of celestial frame, By Vulcan form’d, from Jove to Hermes came : 130 To Pelopş he th' immortal gift resign’d; Th’immortal gift great Pelops left behind, In Atreus' hand, which not with Atreus ends, To rich Thyestes next the prize descends : And now the mark of Agamemnon's reign, 135 Subjects all Argos, and controls the main.

On this bright sceptre now the king reclin'd, And artful thus pronounc'd the speech design'd: Ye fons of Mars ! partake your leader's care, Heroes of Greece, and brothers of the war!

140 of partial Jove with justice I complain, And heavenly oracles believ'd in vain.

A Gafe

F4

A safe return was promis'd to our toils,
Renown'd, triumphant, and enrich'd with spoils.
Now shameful Aight alone can save the hoft, 149
Our blood, our treasure, and our glory loft.
So Jove decrees, refiftless lord of all !
At whose command whole empires rise or fall :
He shakes the feeble props of human trust,
And towns and armies humbles to the dust.

150
What shame to Greece a fruitlefs war to wage,
Oh lasting shame in every future age !
Once great in arms, the common fcorn we grow,
Repuls'd and baffled by a feeble foe.
So fmall their number, that if wars were ceas'd,

155 And Greece triumphant held a general feast, All rank'd by tens; whole decads when they dine Must want a Trojan Nave to pour the wine. But other forces have our hopes o’erthrown, And Troy prevails by armies not her own. 16 Now nine long years of mighty Jove are run, Since first the labours of this war begun : Our cordage torn, decay'd our veffels lie, And scarce ensure the wretched power to fly. Halte then, for ever leave the Trojan wall ! 165 Our weeping wives, our tender children call : Love, duty, safety, fummon us away, 'Tis nature's voice, and nature we obey. Our shatter'd barks may yet transport us o’er, Safe and inglorious, to our native shore.

170 Fly, Grecians, fly, your fails and oars employ, And dream no inore of Heaven-defended Troy.

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