African Political Thought

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Springer, 05.12.2012 - 215 Seiten

For most of its history, the African continent has witnessed momentous political change, remarkable philosophical innovation, and the complex cross-fertilization of ideologies and belief systems. This definitive study surveys the concepts, values, and historical upheavals that have shaped African political systems from the ancient period to the postcolonial era and beyond. Beginning with the emergence of indigenous political institutions, it traces the most important developments in African history, including the Africanization of Islam, liberal democratic movements, socialism, Pan-Africanism, and Africanist-Populist resistance to the neoliberal world order. The result is an invaluable resource on a region too often ignored in the history of political thought.

 

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Inhalt

African Political Thought from Antiquity to the Present
1
The Political Ideology of Indigenous African Political Systems and Institutions from Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century
11
The Influence of Islamic Values and Ideas on Indigenous African Political Systems and Institutions from the Tenth to the Nineteenth Century
21
African Theories and Ideologies of Westernization Modernization and Liberal Democracy from Early West African Nationalism to Humanism
43
PanAfricanism and African Unity From Ideal to Practice
55
The SocialistPopulist Ideology I From Patrice Lumumba to Samora Machel
71
The SocialistPopulist Ideology II From Kwame Nkrumahto Julius Nyerere
85
The PopulistSocialist Ideology From Frantz Fanon to Steve Biko
105
The AfricanistPopulist Ideology Popular Democracy and Development in Africa
129
The Transformative Power of Ideas and Values Toward Peace Development and Democracy in Africa
153
Notes
159
Bibliography
187
Index
213
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Über den Autor (2012)

Guy Martin is currently a visiting Professor of Political Science at Seplman College in Atlanta, Georgia. He previously taught political science at universities in Africa (Botswana, Cameroon, Kenya, and South Africa) and in the U.S. (The American University, University of Virginia, New York University, Clark Atlanta University, and Georgia State University). He is the author of Africa in World Politics: A Pan-African Perspective (2002); co-editor (with Chris Alden) of South Africa and France: Towards a New Engagement in Africa? (2003); and co-author (with Mueni Wa Muiu) of Fundi Wa Afrika: Toward a New Paradigm of the African State (2004).

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