The Mechanical Miners' Guide, Issued by the California Wire Works, Successors to A.S. Hallidie ...

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Seite 48 - Measure the depth (of the vessel, &c.) in feet, extract the square root of that depth, and multiply it by 5.4, which gives the velocity in feet per second ; this multiplied by the area of the orifice in feet, gives the number of cubic feet which flows out in one second. EXAMPLE. Let a sluice be 10 feet below the surface of the water, its length 4 feet, and open 7 inches ; required the quantity of water expended in one second ? x/10=3.
Seite 21 - ... or thickness : so by dividing this result by the breadth, and extracting the square root of the quotient, we have the depth in inches. When a Beam or Bar is fixed at Both Ends, and loaded in the Middle. — RULE. Multiply the safe-load given in the table by...
Seite 21 - Multiply the number in the table by the breadth and square of the depth in inches, and divide the product by the length in feet : the quotient will be the weight, in pounds.
Seite 77 - ... or appears like the white of eggs. Apply it warm. Buff the grain off the leather where it is to be cemented, rub the joint surfaces solidly together, let it dry a few hours, and it is ready for use; and if properly put together, it will not need riveting, as the cement is nearly of the same nature as the leather itself.
Seite 21 - ... this result by the breadth, and extract the square root of the quotient, which gives the depth ; or, divide * When the beam is loaded uniformly throughout its length, the result must be doubled. the result by the square of the depth, and the quotient is the breadth or thickness. When a Beam or Bar is supported at Both Ends, and loaded in the Middle. — RULE. Multiply the safe-load given in the table by 4 times the breadth, and by the square of the depth in inches, and divide this product by...
Seite 20 - ... upon any section is directly as the distance of the weight from that section. The strength of a projecting beam is only one fourth of what it would be if supported at both ends, and the weight applied in the middle. The strength of a projecting beam is only one sixth of one of the same length, fixed at both ends, and the weight applied in the middle.
Seite 28 - For transporting lumber across difficult points, and to shipping in an offing. . For conveying passengers across gorges, chasms, and over hazardous roads. For supplying water to reservoirs across chasms, etc. The advantages claimed are: No grading or road building is required. It can work under all circumstances of weather, with great depths of snow on the ground, during heavy storms and freshets. It can run constantly without rest; as well during a dark night as a clear day. It can cross deep gorges...
Seite 11 - Divide the weight to be raised by the number of parts of the rope engaged in supporting the lower or movable block. Example. — What power is required to raise 600 Ibs., when the lower block contains six sheaves and the end of the rope is fastened to the upper block, and what power when fastened to the lower block ? = 50 Ibs., =46-15 Ibs., 2d Ans.
Seite 21 - When the Bar or Beam is Supported at both Ends, and Loaded in the Middle. RULE.— Multiply the Value in the preceding table by the square the depth, and four times the breadth, in inches, and divide the product by the length in feet.
Seite 49 - ... steam occupies about 1700 times as much space as before. In freezing it expands ^ of its bulk, and ^^ for every degree from 40° to 212°: hence ice floats on the surface of water, and close vessels are burst when the water they contain is frozen. Melted snow produces about •J- of its bulk in water. At the depth of 45 feet the temperature of the earth is uniform during the entire year. FREEZING MIXTURES are frequently required; and the one most convenient for common use, such as freezing ices...

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