General introduction to a course of lectures on English grammar and composition

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W. Ball, 1838 - 131 Seiten
 

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Seite 96 - The cheerful haunts of man, to wield the axe And drive the wedge in yonder forest drear, From morn to eve his solitary task.
Seite 95 - The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school; The watchdog's voice that bayed the whispering wind, And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind; These all in sweet confusion sought the shade, And filled each pause the nightingale had made.
Seite 11 - ... without regard to the maxims of nautical art. A physician, again, will, perhaps, contemn systems of political economy, of logic, or metaphysics, and insist on the superior wisdom of trusting to common-sense in such matters ; but he would never approve of trusting to common-sense in the treatment of diseases.
Seite 115 - Poetry in general; but especially to those parts of composition where the Poet speaks through the mouths of his characters; and upon this point it appears to authorize the conclusion that there are few persons of good sense, who would not allow that the dramatic parts of composition are defective, in proportion as they deviate from the real language of nature...
Seite 95 - Sweet was the sound when oft, at evening's close, Up yonder hill the village murmur rose ; There as I passed with careless steps and slow The mingling notes came softened from below. The swain responsive as the milkmaid sung, The sober herd that lowed to meet their young, The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school, The watchdog's voice that...
Seite 107 - I do not doubt that it may be safely affirmed, that there neither is, nor can be, any essential difference between the language of prose and metrical composition.
Seite 107 - ... but natural and human tears ; she can boast of no celestial ichor that distinguishes her vital juices from those of prose ; the same human blood circulates through the veins of them both...
Seite 107 - We will go further. It may be safely affirmed that there neither is, nor can be, any essential difference between the language of prose and metrical composition.
Seite 10 - Now, by Common Sense is meant, I apprehend (when the term is used with any distinct meaning), an exercise of the judgment unaided by any Art or system of rules; such an exercise as we must necessarily employ in numberless cases of daily occurrence; in which, having no established principles to guide us — no line of procedure, as it were, distinctly chalked out — we must needs act on the best extemporaneous conjectures we can form. He who is eminently skilful in doing this is said to possess a...
Seite 127 - Again, we are not inclined to ascribe much practical value to that analysis of the inductive method which Bacon has given in the second book of the Novum Organum. It is indeed an elaborate and correct analysis. But it is an analysis of that which we are all doing from morning to night, and which we continue to do even in our dreams.

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