Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

S.G. Goodrich ,

OUTLINES

OF

CHRONOLOGY,

ANCIENT AND MODERN;

BEING AN

. ITRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF HISTORY,

ON THE PLAN OF THE

REV. DAVID BLAIR.

FOR THE USE OF SCHOOL 8.

ACCOMPANIED BY A CHART.

NEW AND IMPROVED EDITION, BROUGHT DOWN TO IME

BREWER AND TILESTEX.

BOSTON: ....!!!
BREWER AND TILESTON,

1873.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, to wit

District Clerk's Cfice BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the twenty-third day of June, A. D. 18.8. ia the y-second year of the Independence of the United States of Amer ica, Sarduel G. Goodrich, of the said district, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

“Outlines of Chronology, Ancient and Modern ; being an Introduction to the Study of History. On the Plan of the Rev. David Blair. For the Use of Schools. Accompanied by a Chart.”

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United Suars, entitled, “ An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, cha , and books, to the authors and proprietors of such cupies during the times therein mentionod ;” and also to an act, entitled, " An Act supplementary to an act, entitled, An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and buoks, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned ; and attending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, anu Stoking historice, and uther prints”

JNO. W. DAVIS,
Clark of Ve District of Massachusetts

[merged small][ocr errors]

It is a fact that has probably fallen within the observation of most persons, that few individuals, of · those even who have made History a careful study,

ever obtain a clear and distinct general view of the sub. ject. Many, indeed, understand well a few separate points, but with niost, if its whole details are not speedily rejected from the memory as a load too burdensome to be supported, they lie in the mind in a state of obscurity and confusion. In such cases the recollection of events is difficult and uncertain; the separation of even leading events, from the tangled mass, can scarcely be effected ; and the formation of analogous facts into classes, for the purposes of reasoning and inference, is a thing not thought of.

The reason of this is, doubtless, that the field of Genc. ral History is too large-its details too multifarious , they are presented also in a shape too mazy and complex to be distinctly comprehended even ;-much less to be treasured in the memory. In order to be effectually understood and preserved, they must be arranged into classes, or grouped into periods under some genera, characteristics, which may tie them together by asso ciation, and preserve them for the call of recollection

In the present work an attempt has been made to Inake such a classification as is needed. The subject is divided into twenty periods; each being characterized in such a way as to distinguish it from the others, and at the same time, by associating a large number of facts under a general characteristic, to assist in settling their dates. Thus for example our 6th period of an cient history being characterized as the age of Roman Kings, the learner who has fixed our classification in

« ZurückWeiter »