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FOLKLORE FROM IRELAND:

The Each Ceannan Dubh.

The Each Ceannan Dubh was said to be an enchanted horse. It was a large jet-black animal with fiery eyeballs, and it was said to have a spear protruding from its breast. This horse had its haunts close to a little lake known to-day in Rathlin as Loch an Eich, in the townland of Shandra. As this horse was always dreaded by the inhabitants of the island they made it a rule never to stay out after dark, but on a certain night it happened that a woman belonging to this locality was out late, and as she was halfway across the mountain of Cille Phadraig she heard the sound of the dreaded horse. Seized with terror, she yet collected her senses sufficiently to make off across the mountain towards a high wall which stood close to her dwelling-place. She succeeded in getting over the wall before the horse could come up, but no sooner was she over the wall than she fell in a faint on the other side. The horse came up after her with such force that it sent the spear which was in its breast back through its heart as it struck the wall, and it fell dead.

On the following day the natives all gathered and dragged the dead horse to the place now known as Lag an Eich or “The Steed's Hollow," in the neighbourhood of Dun Eoghan Ruaidh or “Owen Roe's Fort.” Here they buried it, and piled a cairn of stones over its grave.

On that night there was heard a sweet, sad lament in the air coming from the direction of the grave. The words of the keen ran as follows:

Leag's cha do thóg iad é
Leag's cha do thóg iad é
Leag's cha do thóg iad é
Bealach an gharraidhe

O mo each ceannan dubh
O mo each ceannan dubh
O mo each ceannan dubh
Bealach an gharraidhe

Įranslation:

...
Thrown down and they did not raise him
Thrown down and they did not raise him
Thrown down and they did not raise him
The Garden Road.

O my enchanted black horse
O my enchanted black horse
O

my enchanted black horse
The Garden Road.

[Note. — The air to which these verses are sung is singularly elusive and beautiful, and most plaintive. I took down the last line as i m. bealach an gharraidhe, “In the garden road.” Afterwards I read in O’Laverty's History of the Diocese of Down and Connor that there is a tradition in Rathlin that a great lady once lived there and had a beautiful garden on the island. While I was writing out the story the parish priest of Rathlin came in. He says that all these names are in use in Rathlin to-dayLoughaneis, Laganeis, Shandra, Ballynagarry. Ceannan translated to me as 'enchanted,” but might it not be ceannfhionn, "white-faced” or “white-headed ? ”]

]

was

EMILY G. Gough.

HAMPSHIRE FOLKLORE.

Hedgehogs. A few weeks ago at Cove—which might almost be described nowadays as one of Aldershot's suburbs, as the village lies just to the north of the Royal Flying Corps Airship Sheds, and is mainly occupied by the mechanics and artisans employed at the Royal Aircraft Factory-a lady found a hedgehog in an empty house she had just taken. The owner of the house, a local man, wished to destroy it immediately, but she begged it might be kept and put in the garden. The man demurred, she could not do that, the people in the farm at the back of the house would object, because everyone knew that hedgehogs were dangerous to cows. When asked why, he said because they sucked their milk.

I told this to Col. —, who remarked, directly I mentioned the hedgehog, “A hedgehog has no friends," and said when I concluded, “Oh, yes, of course, I know that." His home was in Hertfordshire, and he said all the country folks there say the same about hedgehogs and cows.

D. H. MOUTRAY READ.

APPARITIONS IN LINCOLNSHIRE.

A woman of twenty-seven or twenty-eight said to me at Kirtonin-Lindsey in August, 1910, “O, Miss, me and my sister F. did see something queer to-night! You know that door going into

! the garden of the house that used to be the prison. There seemed to be a man standing at it. F. saw him as well before I spoke, and she got fast hold of my arm. It was as plain as anything, and then he seemed to go right through the door, because he wasn't there! He could not have gone down the road without us seeing him, and he could not have come past us. It was the strangest thing! Well, perhaps it was a shadow we just caught sight of, but then if that was it, why did we both of us think the same? He had a blue jacket and grey trousers, but one of us noticed he had a hat on, and the other remembered him bald.

“My mother once saw one of my uncles when he was dead. It was at Bawtry [Yorkshire) she was living then. She looked out of the window and he was outside, she called her brother ... and he saw him as well. When uncle's wife [i.e. widow) came she could see nothing. He had gone. But she died very soon after.”

M. PEACOCK,

AN ANCIENT RENT SERVICE.

In accordance with custom, the City Solicitor (Sir Homewood Crawford) and the Secondary (Mr. William Hayes) attended before Sir John Macdonell, the King's Remembrancer, at the

Royal Courts of Justice yesterday to render rent service on the part of the Corporation for certain property held from the Crown.

Proclamation was made in these terms: “ Tenants and occupiers of a piece of waste ground called “The Moors ’in the county of Salop come forth and do your service.” The City Solicitor then cut one faggot with a hatchet and another with a billhook. The next proclamation was: “Tenants and occupiers of a certain tenement called “The Forge' in the parish of St. Clements Danes, in the county of Middlesex, come forth and do your service.” Upon this the City Solicitor counted six horse-shoes and 61 nails, the King's Remembrancer saying "Good number.”

“The Forge,” it is said, was pulled down by a mob during a riot in the reign of Richard II., and never restored.

During the proceedings Sir John Macdonell said that the circumstances in which the ceremony originated were unknown. The only information which could be obtained arose from entries in the Rolls of the Exchequer. The ceremony had been observed for the last 700 years, and probably for a longer period. Some such ceremony had been performed annually before the Barons of the Exchequer and his predecessors as King's Remembrancer. How it came about that the Corporation became seised of certain parcels of land in the county of Salop and how they passed out of their possession was not to be explained. The earliest entry on the subject was dated 1211.--The Times, 7th November, 1913.

BURNING CAMPHOR: A STRANGE TAMIL OATH.

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There was an interesting interlude in the Kuala Lumpur Police Court on Saturday during a case in which a Tamil was charged with attempting to crimp two coolies from Waddieburn Estate. One of the Tamil witnesses, a coolie on Waddieburn, said that the accused had asked him on the previous Thursday to go with him to Kuala Kubu on receiving his month's wages.

The accused denied this, and witness said that he was willing to swear a solemn oath that what he had said was true. On being asked what form the oath would take, he said that he

would take the burning camphor oath. The Court being agreeable, witness was sent out to buy some camphor, while the case stood down.

On the proceedings being renewed, witness placed the camphor on the witness box and lit it. He then repeated his statement and slapped the flaming camphor out. Accused objected, saying that the witness had not reported his statement correctly, whereupon the witness took the oath once more. Accused, who put up a weak defence, was fined $75 or two months' rigorous imprisonment.

The burning camphor oath mentioned above is a favourite one with the Tamils, and is said to be very binding. The person taking the oath is supposed to flutter out of life like the camphor flame he extinguishes if he attempts to swear a false statement. (M. M.)—Singapore Free Press, 18th October, 1916.

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