The lyricks...(Sonnets, canzons, odes, and sextines) Englished by Richard F. Burton

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B. Quaritch, 1884
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Seite 460 - Help us to save free conscience from the paw Of hireling wolves, whose Gospel is their maw.
Seite 454 - In the epigram the conclusion is everything ; all that goes before it is only there for the sake of the surprise of the end, or denouement, as in a logical syllogism the premisses are nothing but as they necessitate the conclusion. In the sonnet the emphasis is nearly, but not quite, equally distributed, there being a slight swell, or rise, about the middle.
Seite 315 - Thus fared I Life with other interchanging; I no, but Destiny showing fere unlove; Yet even thus for other ne'er I'd change. Me from my dear-loved patrial nide she drove Over the broad and boisterous Ocean ranging, Where Life so often saw her extreme range. Now tempting rages rare and missiles strange Of Mart, she willed that my eyes should see And hands should touch, the bitter fruit he dight! That on this Shield they sight In painted semblance fire of enemy, Then ferforth driven, vagrant, peregrine....
Seite 313 - Being my shape and form transmew'd; And this transforming with such joy I view'd That e'en my sorrows snared I with its snares; And, like the doomed man, I veiled mine eyes To hide an evil crescive in such guise; Like one caressed and on flattery fed Of Love, for whom his being was born and bred. VII Then who mine absent Life hath power to paint Wi" discontent of all I bore in view; That Bide, so far from where she had her Bide, Speaking, which even what I spake unknew, Wending, withal unseeing where...
Seite 317 - Mid bloom of flowers where wont my youth to stray; Then would the memories of the long sad way Deal me a larger store of Life-content; Viewing fair converse and glad company, Where this and other key She had for opening hearts to new intent; — The fields, the frequent stroll, the lovely show, The view, the snow, the rose, the formosure, The soft and gracious mien so gravely gay, The singular friendship casting clean away All villein longings, earthly and impure, As one whose Other I can never see;...
Seite 309 - ... strange to mortal memory. Such misery tell we To God and Man, and eke, in fine, to air, Whereto so many times did I confide My tale and vainly told as I now tell; But e'en as error was my birthtide-lot, That this be one of many doubt I not. And as to hit the butt so far I fail E'en if I sinned her cease they to chide : Within mine only Refuge will I 'bide To speak and faultless sin with free intent. Sad he so scanty mercies must content! II. Long I've unlearnt me that complaint of dole Brings...
Seite 312 - twas to divine, and hold for sure, That all was truest Truth I could divine ; And straightway all I said in shame to unsay ; To see whatso I saw in contrayr way ; In fine, just Reasons seek for jealousy Yet were the Unreasons eather far to see. VI. I know not how she knew that fared she stealing With Eyen-rays mine inner man which flew Her-ward with subtlest passage through the eyne Little by little all fro' me she drew, E'en as from rain-wet canopy, exhaling The subtle humours, sucks the hot sunshine.
Seite 312 - Hence sombre shades phantastick born and bred Of trifles promising rashest Esperance ; While boons of happy chance Were likewise feigned and enfigured. But her despisal wrought me such dismay That made my Fancy phrenesy-ward incline, Turning to disconcert the guiling lure. Here mine 'twas to divine, and hold for sure, That all was truest Truth I could divine ; And straightway all I said in shame to unsay ; To see whatso I saw in contrayr way ; In fine, just Reasons seek for jealousy Yet were the...
Seite 473 - Hoc scio pro certo / quod si cum stercore certo Vinco vel vincor / semper ego maculor.
Seite 309 - Of the complaints in which my days are rife, Paper, — whereon I gar my griefs o'erflow. Tell we, we twain, Unreasons which in life Deal me inexorable, contrary Destinies surd to prayer and tearful woe. Dash we some water-drops on muchel lowe, Fire we with outcries storm of rage so rare That shall be strange to mortal memory. Such misery tell we To God and Man, and eke, in fine, to air, Whereto so many times did I confide My tale and vainly told as I now tell; But e'en as error was my birthtide-lot,...

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