The Letters of Horace Walpole: 1735-1748

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Lea and Blanchard, 1842
 

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CHAPTER VIII
101
EXTRACTs FROM THE LETTERs of safe AH DUCHEss of MARLBOROUGH TO
111
LETTERS OF HORACE WALPOLE
121
To Richard West Esq Aug 17 Gray and other schoolfellows Eton recol
127
To the same Feelings on revisiting Eton
129
To the same Sept 28 Mountains of Savoy Grande Chartreuse
136
1740
142
To the same April 16 Rome Ruins of the temple of Minerva Medica
148
To the Hon H S Conway July 5Reasons for leaving Rome Malaria
155
To the Hon H S Conway Sept 25 Character of the Florentines Lady
161
To the Rev Joseph Spence Feb 21 Hopes to renew in England an
168
To the same Oct Corsica Bianca Colonna Baron Stosch and his Mal
174
To the same Nov 5 Opera House management
186
To the same Dec 3 Admiral Haddock Meeting of Parliament State
193
To the same Dec 17 Warm debates in Westminster election committee
199
To Sir Horace Mann Jan 7 Reasons why he is not in fashion His fathers
207
To the same Jan 22 House of Commons Merchants petition Leonidas
218
To the same Feb 18 Rumoured impeachments Popular feeling The
224
To the same March 10 The Coalition Motion for a committee of inquiry
236
To the same April 15 Progress of the Secret Committee Committal
246
To the same May 26Ranelagh Vauxhall The Opera Mrs Clive
256
To the same June 14 Peace between Austria and Prussia Ministerial
265
To the same July 7 New Place Bill General Guise Monticelli
271
To the same July 29About to set out for Houghton Evening at Rane
278
To the same Sept 11 Visit to Woolterton A Catalague of New French
284
To the same Oct 16 Admiral Matthews Yarmouth Roads A ballad
290
To the same Dec 23Difficulty of writing upon nothing
301
To the same Feb 2Debate in the Lords on disbanding the Hanoverian
308
To the same March 25 Epidemic Death of Dr Blackburne Archbishop
314
To the same May 12 Death of the Duchess of Kendal Story of Old Sarah
322
To the same June 20 Visit to Euston Kent Anecdote of Lord Euston
329
To the same Aug 16 Preparations for a journey to Houghton Rule for conquering the passions Country life of Prussias address to
385
To the same Oct 19Defeat of the King of Sardinia Loss of the ship
392
To Sir Horace Mann Jan 4 Complains of dearth of news His ink at low
399
To the same March 29 Death of Lord Orford Inquiry into the miscarriage
406
To George Montagu Esq May 18 Condolence on the death of Mr Mon
415
To George Montagu Esq June 25Mistley the seat of Mr Rigby
421
To George Montagu Esq July 13 Success of the French in Flanders Lord
428
To Sir Horace Mann Aug 7 Rumours of an invasion Proclamation
434
To the same Sept 13Progress of the rebellion The Duke of Newcastles
437
To the same Oct 4 Operations against the rebels Spirited conduct of
443
To the same Nov 15 Disturbance about the new regiments Advance
449
To the same Dec 9 Conduct of the rebels at Derby Black Friday Pre
455
To the same Jan 17 The rebels fortifying themselves in Scotland
461
To the same March 6Reunion of the dispersed clans Lord Lovat
469
To the same April 25 Battle of Culloden Escape of the young Pretender
476
To Sir Horace Mann June 6 Marriage of the Princess Mary to the Prince
482
To George Montagu Esq June 24 Ministerial changes Arrival of rebel
486
To George Montagu Esq Aug 2Trials of the rebel Lords Anecdotes
494
To George Montagu Esq Aug 16 Anecdotes of the rebel Lords under
500
To the Hon H S Conway Oct 3 Enclosing Grays Ode on a distant
507
To the same Nov 12
513
To the same Feb 23 The Opera Debates on places and pensions Lord
519
To Sir Horace Mann May 5 The new Stadtholder Scotch Clanships Bill
527
To Sir Horace Mann June 26 Election tumults Sir Jacob Bouveries
533
To the same Nov 10Admiral Hawkes victory Meeting of the
539
To Sir Horace Mann March 11Prevalence of miliary fever Death of
545
To the same May 26 Ranelagh Anecdotes Sir Thomas Bootle Story
551
To the same Aug 11 Anecdotes of the House of Vere Kitty Clive Gar
558
To Sir Horace Mann Sept 12Death of Bishop Gibson
565
To George Montagu Esq Oct 20
568

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Seite 457 - ' said Lamb, "that were ever paid by the wit of man. Each of them is worth an estate for life — nay, is an immortality. There is that superb one to Lord Cornbury: 'Despise low joys, low gains; Disdain whatever Cornbury disdains; Be virtuous, and be happy for your pains.
Seite 196 - I remember an instance : when I published the Plan for my Dictionary, Lord Chesterfield told me that the word great should be pronounced so as to rhyme to state ; and Sir William Yonge sent me word that it should be pronounced so as to rhyme to seat, and that none but an Irishman would pronounce it grait l.
Seite 129 - Lord ! how great I used to think anybody just landed at the Christopher ! But here are no boys for me to send for — here I am, like Noah, just returned into his old world again, with all sorts of queer feels about me. By the way, the clock strikes the old cracked sound — I recollect so much, and remember so little...
Seite 501 - Pretender was so sweet a Prince that flesh and blood could not resist following him ; and lying down to try the block, he said, ' If I had a thousand lives, I would lay them all down here in the same cause.
Seite 52 - You perceive by my date that I am got into a new camp, and have left my tub at Windsor. It is a little play-thinghouse that I got out of Mrs. Chenevix's shop, and is the prettiest bauble you ever saw. It is set in enamelled meadows, with filigree hedges : A small Euphrates through the piece is roll'd, And little finches wave their wings in gold.
Seite 501 - ... arm, as if he were giving the signal for battle. He received three blows, but the first certainly took away all sensation. He was not a quarter of an hour on the scaffold ; Lord Kilmarnock above half a one. Balmerino certainly died with the intrepidity of a hero, but with the insensibility of one too. As he walked from his prison to execution, seeing every window and top of house filled with spectators, he cried out, 'Look, look, how they are all piled up like rotten oranges!
Seite 500 - Balmerino followed, alone, in a blue coat, turned up with red, (his rebellious regimentals), a flannel waistcoat, and his shroud beneath; their hearses following. They were conducted to a house near the scaffold: the room forwards had benches for spectators, in the second Lord Kilmarnock was put, and in the third backwards Lord Balmerino: all three chambers hung with black. Here they parted! Balmerino embraced the other, and said, "My lord, I wish I could suffer for both!
Seite 406 - He exercis'd his troops, the signal given, Flew off at once with his Numidian horse To the south gate, where Marcus holds the watch. I saw, and call'd to stop him, but in vain, He toss'd his arm aloft, and proudly told me He would not stay and perish like Sempronius.
Seite 56 - Romanorum," the author of the Mysterious Mother, a tragedy of the highest order, and not a puling love-play. He is the father of the first romance, and of the last tragedy in our language, and surely worthy of a higher place than any living writer, be he who he may.
Seite 497 - Heaven ! of woes like ours, And let us, let us weep no more." The dismal scene was o'er and past, The lover's mournful hearse retired The maid drew back her languid head, And, sighing forth his name, expired.

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