The works of John Locke. To which is added the life of the author and a collection of several of his pieces, publ. by mr. Desmaizeaux

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Seite 264 - And many of the people believed on him, and said, When Christ cometh, will he do more miracles than these which this man hath done?
Seite 311 - To which the acute and judicious proposer answers: "Not. For though he has obtained the experience of how a globe, how a cube, affects his touch ; yet he has not yet...
Seite 52 - ... rebukes, and so lessen their authority. And here is another great inconvenience, which children receive from the ill examples which they meet with, amongst the meaner servants. They are wholly, if possible, to be kept from such conversation : for the contagion of these ill precedents, both in civility and virtue, horribly infects children, as often as they come within reach of it. They frequently learn from unbred or debauched servants such language, untowardly tricks and vices, as otherwise...
Seite 27 - As the strength of the body lies chiefly in being able to endure hardships, so also does that of the mind. And the great principle and foundation of all virtue and worth is placed in this, that a man is able to deny himself his own desires, cross his own inclinations, and purely follow what reason directs as best, though the appetite lean the other way.
Seite 264 - Ye both know me, and ye know whence I am : and I am not come of myself, but he that sent me is true, whom ye know not. 29 But I know him ; for I am from him, and he hath sent me.
Seite 263 - If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin: but now have they both seen and hated both me and my Father.
Seite 61 - None of the things they are to learn should ever be made a burden to them, or imposed on them as a task. Whatever is so proposed, presently becomes irksome : the mind takes an aversion to it, though before it were a thing of delight or indifferency.
Seite 142 - Reading, and writing, and learning, I allow to be necessary, but yet not the chief business. I imagine you would think him a very foolish fellow, that should not value a virtuous, or a wise man, infinitely before a great scholar.
Seite 115 - Curiosity in children (which I had occasion just to mention § 108) is but an appetite after knowledge; and therefore ought to be encouraged in them, not only as a good sign, but as the great instrument nature has provided to remove that ignorance they were born with; and which, without this busy inquisitiveness, will make them dull and useless creatures.
Seite 30 - her princess ?" Thus the little ones are taught to be proud of their clothes before they can put them on. And why should they not continue to value themselves for...

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