Entertaining Dialogues: Designed for the Use of Young Students in Schools and Academies

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A.S. Barnes, 1859 - 312 Seiten
 

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Seite 105 - I have ventured. Like little wanton boys that swim on bladders. This many summers in a sea of glory ; But far beyond my depth ; my high-blown pride At length broke under me ; and now has left me.
Seite 92 - O now, for ever, Farewell the tranquil mind ! Farewell content ! Farewell the plumed troop, and the big wars, That make ambition virtue ! O, farewell ! Farewell the neighing steed, and the shrill trump, The spirit-stirring drum, the ear-piercing fife, The royal banner ; and all quality. Pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war...
Seite 95 - Yes, I am proud ; I must be proud to see Men, not afraid of God, afraid of me ; Safe from the bar, the pulpit, and the throne, Yet touch'd and sham'd by ridicule alone.
Seite 92 - A drop of patience : but, alas, to make me A fixed figure for the time of scorn To point his slow unmoving finger at ! Yet could I bear that too ; well, very well : But there, where I have garner'd up my heart, Where either I must live, or bear no life ; The fountain from the which my current runs, Or else dries up...
Seite 92 - I'd whistle her off and let her down the wind, To prey at fortune. Haply, for I am black And have not those soft parts of conversation That chamberers have, or for I am declined Into the vale of years, yet that's not much, She's gone.
Seite 97 - I shall do so; But I must also feel it as a man: I cannot but remember such things were, That were most precious to me.
Seite 107 - Cromwell, I did not think to shed a tear In all my miseries; but thou hast forced me, Out of thy honest truth, to play the woman. Let's dry our eyes: and thus far hear me, Cromwell; And, when I am forgotten, as I shall be, And sleep in dull cold marble, where no mention Of me more must be heard of, say, I taught thee...
Seite 97 - Merciful heaven! What, man! ne'er pull your hat upon your brows; Give sorrow words: the grief that does not speak Whispers the o'erfraught heart, and bids it break.
Seite 187 - The evil that men do lives after them, The good is oft interred with their bones; So let it be with Caesar.
Seite 105 - Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has...

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