Elements of Trigonometry, Plane and Spherical: With The Principles of Perspective, and Projection of the Sphere

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A. Murray & J. Cochran, sold by A. Kincaid & W. Creech, W. Gray, and J. Bell, 1772 - 251 Seiten

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Seite 81 - Proportion by the line of lines. Make the lateral distance of the second term the parallel distance of the first term ; the parallel distance of the third term is the fourth proportional. Example. To find a fourth proportional to 8, 4, and 6, take the lateral distance of 4, and make it the parallel distance of 8 ; then the parallel distance of 6, extended from the centre, shall reach to the fourth proportional 3, In the same manner a third proportional is found to two numbers. Thus, to find a third...
Seite xxii - The circumference of every circle is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts, called degrees ; and each degree into 60 equal parts, called minutes ; and each minute into 60 equal parts, called seconds ; and these into thirds, etc.
Seite 82 - Thus, if it were required to find a fourth proportional to 4, 8, and 6; because the lateral distance of the second term 8 cannot be made the parallel distance of the first term 4, take the lateral distance of 4, viz. the half of 8, and make it the parallel distance of the first term 4 ; then the parallel distance of the third term 6, shall reach from the centre to 6, viz.
Seite 94 - ... the three angles of a triangle are together equal to two right angles, although it is not known to all.
Seite 82 - ... reach to the fourth proportional 3. In the same manner, a third proportional is found to two numbers. Thus, to find a third proportional to 8 and 4, the sector remaining as in the former example, the parallel distance of 4, extended from the centre, shall reach to the third proportional 2.
Seite 164 - If a solid angle be contained by three plane angles, any two of them are together greater than the third.
Seite 27 - N. and if the firft be a multiple, or part of the fecond ; the third is the fame multiple, or the fame part of the fourth. Let A be to B, as C is to D ; and firft let A be a multiple of B ; C is the fame multiple of D. Take E equal to A, and whatever multiple A or E is of B, make F the fame multiple of D. then becaufe A is to B, as C is to D ; and of B the fecond and D the fourth equimultiples have been taken E and F...
Seite 74 - From 1 to 2 From 2 to 3 From 3 to 4 From 4 to 5 From 5 to 6 From 6 to 7 From 7 to 8 From 8 to 9...
Seite 39 - But in logarithms, division is performed by subtraction ; that is, the difference of -the logarithms of two num-bers, is the logarithm of the quotient of those numbers.
Seite 237 - ... circumpolar, or so near to the elevated pole as to perform its apparent daily revolution about it without passing below the horizon, then the latitude of the place will be equal to the sum of the true altitude, and the codeclination or polar distance of the object; for this sum will obviously measure the elevation of the pole above the horizon, which is equal to the latitude.

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