Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

OF THE

Knickerbocker

Magazine.

The Thirtieth Volume of the KNICKERBOCKER MAGAZINE will commence on the first of July, 1847. The work has been so long before the public, that it is not deemed necessary to enlarge upon its claims to general favor. The annexed List of Contributors to the Magazine, and a few notices of the work, (up to and including the last number) will sufficiently attest its character and its popularity: WASHINGTON IRVING, F. W. EDMONDS,

HENRY BREVOORT,
WILLIAM C. BRYANT, WILLIAM WORDSWORTH, CHARLES M. LEUPP,
J. FENIMORE COOPER, CHARLES ASTOR BRISTED. Hon. G. C. VERPLANCK
FITZ-GREENE HALLECK, MRS. GILMAN. (S. C.)

J. N. BELLOWS,
PROF. H. W.LONGFELLOW, E. T. T. MARTIN,

Rev. MR. GANNETT, (Mass.) J. K. PAULDING, H. W. ELLSWORTH,

PROFESSOR FELTON, Miss C. M. SEDGWICK, H. J. RAYMOND, Esq.

STACY G. POTTS,
Rev. WM. WARE,

H. R. SCHOOLCRAFT, J. G. WHITTIER,
HON LEWIS CASS,
Rev. J. PIERPONT,

H. W. ROCKWELL,
CAPT. F. MARRYAT,
COL. T. S. McKENNY,

WILLIAM PITT PALMER,
J. H. STEPHENS,
PHILIP HONE, Esq.

ROBERT S. CHILTON, Esq. SIR E. L. BULWER, JOHN T. IRVING,

DR. A. BRIGHAM, REV. ORVILLE DEWEY, ALBERT PIKE, Esq.

FREDERICK W. SHELTON, J. H. COTT, Esq., REV. HENRY BASCOM, EDWARD S. GOULD, Hon. R. M. CHARLTON, CHARLES SPRAGUE,

CHARLES F. HOFFMAN,
JAMES G. PERCIVAL,

RICHARD B. KIMBALL, Esq. Mas. E. F. ELLET.
Gov. W. H. SEWARD,
PARK BENJAMIN,

ANSON H. CENTER, Esq.
Hon. R. H. WILDE,
THEODORE S. FAY.

J. H. GOURLIE, Esq. JARED SPARKS,

MRS. FANNY K. BUTLER, HORACE GREELEY, HARRY FRANCO,'

Miss CHARLOTTE CUSHMAN BEV. DR. PISE, NATH. HAWTHORNE, HON. JAS, KENT,

THOMAS W. STORROW EQ. MRB. L. H. SIGOURNEY, REV. WALTER COLTON, R. H. BACON, CAMBRIDGE, MASS Rev. Dr. BETHUNE, PRESIDENT DUER,

GEORGE LUNT,
MRS.KIRKLAND,(Mary Clavers) JOSEPH BARBER,

H.T. TUCKERMAN,
Miss LESLIE,
Miss H. F. GOULD,

MRS. M. E. HEWITT,
W.D. GALLAGHER,

HON. JUDGE HALL, (ILL.) ProF. JAMES J. MAPES,
HON. JUDGE CONRAD, ALEXANDER WATSON, ESQ. REV. MR. BACON,
Dr. O. W. HOLMES,

Rev. W. B. O. PEABODY, J. H. SHELDON, JR.,
JOSEPH C. NEAL,

PROF. CHARLES ANTHON, J. G. SAXE, Esq., THOS. W. PARSONS,

ALFRED B. STREET, JOHN HENRY HOPKINS,(VT.) PROF. HITCHCOCK, JOHN WATERS,

J. F. JACKSON, ALABAMA, MRS. E.C. EMBURY,

CONSUL G. W. GREENE, MR. F. PARKMAN, (Boston) Hon. D. D. BARNARD, JAMES BROOKS,

JAS. RUSSELL LOWELL, Esq. J. P. BROWN, Constantinople. Rev. DR. SPRING,

PETER SCHEMIL.' The foregoing list included also ROBERT SOUTHEY, Rev. TIMOTHY Flint, Miss LANDON, CH. JUSTICE MELLEN, TYRONE POWER, ROBERT C. SANDS, WILLIS GAYLORD CLARK, B. B. THATCHER, Dr. CALEB TICKNOR, WM. H. SIMMONS, JOHN SANDERSON, the American in Paris,' NICHOLAS BIDDLE, Miss Mary-ANNE BROWNE,(Mrs. Gray,) England, Rev. Dr. BRANTLEY, South-Carolina, WilLIAM L. STONE, Rev. Dr. Beasley, New-Jersey, J. H. HILLHOUSE, and other distinguished writers who have paid the debt of nature. The following notices of the KNICKERBOCKER are from the American and English press, and from American and British writers of distinction :

*The first number of the Twenty-Seventh Volume of this venerable and widely-popular periodical appears upon entirely new and beautiful type, in all its departments; and in its rich and diversified contents, continues to vindicate its reputation as the most agreeable and entertaining Magazine published in the United States. When we first started the old .New-Yorker,' our friend CLARK had preceded us as Editor of the KNICKERBOCKER about a twelvemonth; it has now reached an age greatly beyond that of any American Monthly; a fact which literally speaks volumes' in praise of the manner in which the work has been conducted. No number of the K. has ever been issued under:CLARK's supervision that did not bear indubitable evidence of editorial care, and anxious thought and well-directed labor enstamped upon its pages. We have known no monthly, of this country or Europe, so thoroughly edited, in the strictest sense of the term. With a corps of contributors embracing the most eminent writers of the country, with not a few from the other side of the water, it has been able to present articles of a high order of merit, and in rich variety; while, as if emulous of the contributed portions, the editorial department has regularly increased in variety and abundance.' – New-York Daily Tribune.

* NOTHING is more remarkable than the unfailing promptitude of this old Monthly, except perhaps its constant and constantly increasing excellence. Mathematicians tell us of certain curves called asymptotes, whose peculiarity is always to approach each other, and yet, oven when infinitely extended, never to intersect. The KNICKERBOCKER, which has reached an age for a Magazine auch greater than a hundred years for a man, and only to be attained by a more marvellous mirai. chas perpetually approached the highest possible point of interest and excellence; and yet it seems to have an excelsior, for each number seems better than that which went before. How it is done our friend CLARK may understand - but it is a sealed mystery to us. There is no publication in the United States that has so attractive or popular a feature as the Editor's Table of the KNICKERBOCKER.' - New York Courier and Enquirer.

Sec third page of Cover.

ART. I. IZAAK WALTON'S COMPLETE ANGLER. EDITED BY AN AMERICAN,

381 II. STANZAS: CHILDHOOD, BY A YOUNG TRISH GIRL,

399 III. THE SKELETON AT GIBRALTAR. BY WILLIAM R. HOPKINS,

390 IV. LETTERS FROM THE GULF-STATES. NUMDER Six,

393 V. THE FALLEN BRAVE IN MEXICO,

397 VI. TIE ITINERANT MUSICIAN: A BALLAD. By J. A. SWAN, Esq.

399 VI). HUMAN DESTINY ON THE AMERICAN CONTINENT. By R. W. HASKINS, A. M., 399 VIII. THE DEATH OF DE CHASTELAER: AN HISTORICAL SKETCH,

407 IX. CRIBBINGS OF LAURENCE STERNE. IN A LETTER TO THE EDITOR,

410 X. THE FAREWELL OF NATURE,

414 XI. STANZAS: THE TEAR-PLANT. By Joseph W. BENNETT,

415 XII. SOME PLAIN THOUGHTS ON MANLY EDUCATION,

416 XIIL. OCTOBER AT DOBB, HIS FERRY.' By H. W. ROCKWELL,

431 XIV. INGLESIDE CHIT-CHAT. BY “THE SQUIRE,'

433 XV. STANZAS: BUENA-VISTA. BY A NEW CONTRIBUTOR,

436 XVI. SONNET: TO DEATH. By . GULIELMUS,'

437 XVII. SERMON OF THE QUAKERESS, WITH IMPROVEMENTS,'.

437 XVIII. WHAT SHALL I WISH THEE?— A LOVE-SONNET,

440

445

449

449

LITERARY NOTICES:

1. SECOND NOTICE OF GRISWOLD'S 'PROSE-WRITERS OF AMERICA,
2. PRISOV DISCIPLINE : SEPARATE' AND 'SILENT SYSTEMS,
3. THE POETICAL WORKS OF FITZ-GREENE HALLECK, .

4. THE NORTH-AMERICAN REVIEW FOR OCTOBER, Editor's TABLE:

1. KIT NORTII IN A STATE OF · RETIRACY,'
2. A LEAF FROM THE ANNALS OF INSANITY,.
3. POETRY AND ROMANCE OF THE STEAX-BOAT,
4. GOSSIP WITH READERS AND CORRESPONDENTS,

450

452

454

457

1. SOME PASSAGES IN THE LIFE AND CORRESPONDENCE OF THE LATE JUDGE SMITH

OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 2. MODERN LITERATURE: A SWEEPING REFORMER. 3. THE LITTLE FRENCHMAN AND HIS PICTURE: A STORY BY Jarvis, 4. A DOBBSONIAN LAMENT. IN VEASE. 5 THE GENTLEMAN IN BLACK' 6. DECADENCE OF DUELLING: HOW TO GET RID OF A SECOND. 7. 'THE GREATEST PLAGUE IN LIFE.' 8. · A CHAPTER ON NOSES' 9. THE SEA IS HIS, AND HE MADE IT: STANZAS BY TENNYSON. 10. •A SOFT ANSWER TUNNETH AWAY WRATH.' U. THE WINES,' A DRAMA. 12. Gussip BY A TRAVELLER IN VERMONT: ESSENCE-PIDDLERY. 13. MORNING MIST ON THE TAPPAAN-ZEE. 14. THE ARMY Port-Folio. 15. THE LATE AND EARLY MARTED 16. THE DEMOCRATIC BATTLE-GROUND OF AMERICA. 17. THE THIRTY-FIRST VOLUME OF THE KINCKERBOCKER. 18. A.FIXE OLD ENGLISH GENTLEMIN. 19. MATCHES, INFERNAL AND MATRIMONIAL. 20. MANLY EDUCATION, 21. A NON. CHURCH-GOER'S NON SEQUITUR. 22. DUBIOUS ADVERTISEMENTS. 23. DEATH OF A SCHOOLMASTER 24. WHO WROTE • MARY'S DREAM ?' 25 DESHONG'S ARITHMETICAL SYSTEM. 26. ANECDOTE OF THE PRINCE OF S 27. SACRED RELICS IN ITALY: (ILBERT DAVIS, ESQUINE. 28. OLD SOL. SMITH.' 29. POETRY ON AN OLD ANCHOR. 3). A MODEST CORRESPONDENT. 31. • THE OREGON TRAIL.' 32. •CRIBBINGS' OF STERNE: PLAGIARISMS. 33. MAGAZINES IN MANUFACTURING Towys. 31. • EASY' CLERGYMEN, 33. THE OLD DRAGON OF WANTI.EY.' 36. DOUGLAS JERROLD': • New:PAPER' AND THE KNICKERBOCKER. 37 THE FOUR VIRTUES OF CHIVALRIE' 3- ANECDOTE OF A BUFFALO BONTFACE. 39. LOVE SONG OF A PHRENOLOGIST: 40). THE BROADWAY THEATRE, 41, THE MISFORTUNES OF KING ARTHOUR.' 42 A DURKY CAFE IN PARIS : MONSIEUR MATURIN, THE MATCHLESS, 43. AN EXECRABLE PUN. 41. THE NEW YORK EVENING MIRROR. 45. WALTON'S ANGUER. 46 OF A KISSE:' BY SIR PHILIP SYDNEY. 47. PARABLES OF OUR LORD. 48. •ON ENVY.' 49. UNIQUE POETICAL LOVE-LETTER 51). Two • BIG STORIES.' 51. LAWYERS. 52. CAMPAIGN SRETCHS OF THE WAR WITH MEXICO. 53. SOLEMNITY OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE. 54. OUR TITTLEBAT TITMOUSE OF THE LAKES. 55. TO OUR FRIENDS THE PUBLISHERS.

NOTICE.

COUNTRY SUBSCRIBERS who are in arrears should recollect to make returns for what we send them. Remittances to be made to

JOHN ALLEN,
139 Nassau-street,

New-York. Mr. T. P. Williams is our General Agent to receive the names of Subscribers. Editors and others kindly interested in the circulation of this Magazine, will oblige us by facilitating his designs.

Entered, according to the act of Congress, in the year 1847,

BY JOHN ALLEN. In the Clerk's office of the District Court of the Southern District of New York.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

Before offering any remarks on the work whose title stands at the head of the present article, we propose for a moment to dwell on, without strictly analyzing, the seemingly contradictory elements in which man moves and has his being, and which compose what we call Life. We may then be prepared to wonder less at the happiness, the apathy, restlessness, vanity, pride; the show of wealth, the desire to conceal it, the arrogant claims of learning, the workings of retired talent; the pangs of unrequited effort, and a multiplicity of noisy nothings, that in their day and sway speak trumpet-tongued.

There is the Retired Man or Business; overlaid with all the seeming requisites of happiness ; breakfasts when he chooses, dines sumptuously, lounges in his unread library, and takes his airing in almost regal style. By the fellowship which he has acquired in society he is constantly reminded of his deficiencies in those accomplishments that invest life with charms the most engaging and dig. nity the most enduring. Thrice every week he goes to his bed, wofully sensible that Virgil and Horace have lived for him in vain, and Grecian bards tuned their lyres for more fortunate or happier sensibilities. He awakes on his fiftieth anniversary, determined to enter the labyrinth of classic lore, and is lost.

There is the PLODDING MERCHANT, who goes to his counting-room, and until his letters are read, is hardly conscious of existence : be reads and is filled ; his brow contracting and expanding; determines to sell his cotton and coffee to the first bidder, and at the least sacrifice;

; goes home with a sinker at his heart, finds fault with his dinner, and if he has a wife, is almost tempted to sell her.

* • The complete Angler; or the Contemplative Man's Recreation. With Biographical Preface and copious Notes, by the AMERICAN Editor.' In two volumes. New-York: WILEY AND PUT. XAY. VOL. Xxx.

50

There is the STOCKBROKER, gregarious from his birth : he goes to his six-by-eight lodgment in Wall-street with a quick step, and every muscle and look alert : he goes out to feed in the highway, as hens do, along with their brood, until ten o'clock, when he mounts to a higher region to sett, ruminate and realize ; philosophizes on the insecurity of securities ; hates the market for its likeness to the tides; is vexed that he did not go into · Harlæm' instead of . LongIsland;' goes home to dinner; looks grave at his wife ; snubs his chil. dren, and protests having any more.

There is Peter Snug, who has lived long enough on one spot to make his oneness immortal: he serves as a perpetual sign-board to the rising and risen generation. His trophies are defunct dealers, non-descript merchants, and visionary shop-keepers. He rises with the sun, breakfasts and dines with telegraphic despatch, and makes his bank-deposit so uniformly, that its omission would throw an ordinary cashier into a fit of sickness. He early calculated the price of wife and children, and was frightened by the footing-up. Blow high or blow low, he stands alone and erect.

There is the very Close, Shrewd Man, who is viewed by the community as a sort of walking razor; rarely offers his arm,

unless to a stranger, and can scent an applicant for a loan the length of a street. In his domicil you may remark design - all concurring and subservient to one end - self; and it is fortunate if his children do not prove a race of little pen-knives. The daily torment of this man is, the fear of being over-reached, and dying of a broken heart.

There is the Man of Great PRETENSIONS, whom to buy at his own price would beggar an Astor. Behind bis chair and carriage servants wait; a very respectable man, that nobody respects; in words how full of piety, in actions how inexorable! He has an allabounding appetite for big-sounding agencies; his notion of equity is defined by Selden's remark “according to the size of the chancellor's foot. In settling a family estate he would be more executioner than executor; and if he should ever die, a slate and pencil would sufficiently emblazon his memory.

There is the FORTUNATE UNFORTUNATE: the man, who, when his last creditor signed off, rose in imagination like a rocket; a millionaire in prospect, and prospects enough for a million. Conquer or die !' was his new motto, and be did die, and made no sign.'

There is the Young LAWYER, more briefless than hopeless; fight. ing with Spartan courage, by book, for place and reputation; his name is seen where men most do congregate, but they embrace none of his clients : he feels the want of a tract that has been illumined by the genius of progenitors, in which to walk. Though he drinks freely at the sources of legal knowledge, the soul of the inner man gives no evidence of fertility. He feels that there can be no summer for him, and therefore wraps the 'drapery of his couch about him, and lies down' to dream of some new mode of acquiring the means of subsistence.

There is the Long-Headed Man, who walks only in ten-league boots; avoids turnpikes for their shortness, and especially for their

« ZurückWeiter »