A Practical Treatise on Concrete and how to Make it: With Observations on the Uses of Cements, Limes and Mortars

Cover
E. & F.N. Spon, 1869 - 108 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 124 - CONTENTS : Chap. I. How Work is Measured by a Unit, both with and without reference to a Unit of Time — Chap. 2. The Work of Living Agents, the Influence of Friction, and introduces one of the most beautiful Laws of Motion — Chap.
Seite 124 - Practical Specifications of Works executed in Architecture, Civil and Mechanical Engineering, and in Road Making and Sewering : To which are added a series of practically useful Agreements and Reports. By JOHN BLENKARN. Illustrated by 15 large folding plates. 8vo. $9.00 BLINN.— A Practical Workshop Companion for Tin, Sheet-Iron, and Copperplate...
Seite 57 - Both specimens present the same appearance — that of a mixture of plaster of a slight pinkish color, with crystalized selenite or gypsum. They do not appear to contain any sand, the silicic acid being evidently in combination with alumina as clay. Part of the selenite was probably burnt, and the result mixed up with burnt lime, ground chalk, or marl, and coarsely-ground selenite. The latter would act the part of sand in our mortars, ie, prevent undue contraction in drying. The quantity of water...
Seite 105 - The softer and more workable stones are of various degrees of absorbency, and are often more retentive of moisture than common brick. Professor Ansted states that the facility with which sandstone absorbs water is illustrated by the quantity it contains both in its ordinary state and when saturated. He states that even granite always contains a certain percentage of water, and in...
Seite 88 - Commission is the expediency of encouraging the formation of partnerships en commandite, as they exist on the continent of Europe, and in the United States of America...
Seite 80 - ... cements require more than those that have become stale. An excess of water is, however, better than a deficiency, particularly when a very energetic cement is used, as the capacity of this substance for solidifying water is great. A too rapid desiccation of the concrete might involve a loss of cohesive and adhesive strength if insufficient water be used.
Seite 105 - In England the common bricks absorb as much as a pint or pound of water. Supposing the external walls of an ordinary cottage to be one brick thick, and to consist of 12,000 bricks, they will be capable of holding 1500 gallons or 6j tons of water when saturated.
Seite 80 - They are made by attaching rectangular blocks of hard wood shod with iron, to wood handles about 3 feet long, and are plied in an upright position. Certain precautions are necessary in mixing and ramming the materials, in order to secure the best results. Especial care should be taken to avoid the use of too much water in the manipulation. The mass of concrete, when ready for use, should appear quite incoherent and not wet and plastic, containing water, however, in such quantities that a thorough...
Seite 121 - Applebys' Illustrated Handbook of Machinery and Iron Work, with the Cost, the Working Expenses, and the Results obtained in the use of Steam and Hand Cranes, Pumps, Fixed and Portable Steam Engines and various other Machines ; with Weight, Measurement, &c., &c.
Seite 80 - It will be found in practice that cements vary very considerably in their capacity for water and that fresh ground cements require more than those that have become stale. An excess of water is, however, better than a deficiency, particularly when a very energetic cement is used, as the capacity of this substance for solidifying water is great.

Bibliografische Informationen