Chasing Villa: The Story Behind the Story of Pershing's Expedition into Mexico

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Stackpole Books, 15.09.2017 - 296 Seiten
On March 9, 1916 the border town of Columbus, New Mexico was attacked by forces under the command of the Mexican revolutionary, Pancho Villa. Eighteen Americans were killed and a number of buildings were burned to the ground before the U.S. Cavalry, inflicting heavy losses, drove Villa and his mounted band back into Mexico. Frank Tompkins, a Major in the U.S. Cavalry at the time, led the counter-attack against Villa’s mounted men on March 9th, and was with General John "Black Jack" Pershing during the subsequent year-long "Punitive Expedition" that sought to capture the elusive Villa in Mexico. The Columbus Raid and Punitive Expedition proved to be the last major campaign of the U.S. Cavalry. At the same time it presaged the more modern military techniques that would soon be employed by American forces in World War I. First published in 1934 and long out of print, "Chasing Villa" is a sound and literate record of milestone events in Western history, military history, the Mexican revolution, and the last of the horse cavalry.

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CHAPTER XXI The Situation after the Fight at Guerrero
CHAPTER XXII Operations of the Provisional Squadron 11th Cavalry Howze March 24 to April 2
CHAPTER XXIII Operations of the Provisional Squadron 11th Cavalry Allen March 30 to April 15
CHAPTER XXIV Operations of the Provisional Squadron 13th Cavalry Tompkins April 2 to 12
CHAPTER XXV Operations of the 10th Cavalry March 31 to April 15 The Fight at Aguas Calientes
CHAPTER XXVI Operations of the Provisional Squadron 11th Cavalry Howze April 3 to 15 Evidence and Speculation as to Villas Whereabouts
CHAPTER XXVII Rendezvous at Santa Cruz de Villegas Conferences with the Mexicans
CHAPTER XXVIII Operations of the 7th Cavalry near Guerrero The Fight at Tomochic

CHAPTER VIII Villas Raid on Columbus New Mexico
CHAPTER IX The Pursuit from Columbus
CHAPTER X Incidents of the Fight at Columbus
CHAPTER XI Colonel Slocum U S Commander at Columbus Attacked and Vindicated
CHAPTER XII Diplomatic Exchanges Following the Raid
CHAPTER XIII Orders for the Punitive Expedition
CHAPTER XIV The Expedition Enters Mexico
CHAPTER XV Campaign of the Three Cavalry Columns from Colonia Dublan Operations of the 7th Cavalry March 18 to April 3 The Fight at Guerr...
CHAPTER XVI Campaign of the Three Columns Operations of the Second Squadron 10th Cavalry March 19 to 31
CHAPTER XVII Campaign of the Three Columns Operations of the First Squadron 10th Cavalry March 19 to 31
CHAPTER XVIII Survey of the Campaign of the Three Columns False Information and Treachery Enable Villa to Elude the Americans Four New C...
CHAPTER XIX Operations of the Second Squadron 13th Cavalry Lindsley March 21 to April 2
CHAPTER XX Operations of the Provisional Squadron 10th and 13th Cavalry Tompkins March 21 to April 2
CHAPTER XXIX The Cavalry Withdraws to the North End of the Chase
CHAPTER XXX The New Plan The Country Divided into Districts The Fight at Ojos Azules
CHAPTER XXXI Behind the Scenes with the Politicians
CHAPTER XXXII The Killing of Cardenas and Cervantes
CHAPTER XXXIII The Fight at Carrizal
CHAPTER XXXIV The Evacuation of Mexico An Inglorious Ending
CHAPTER XXXV The National Guard on the Mexican Border
APPENDIX A SOME CAVALRY LESSONS OF THE MEXICAN PUNITIVE EXPEDITION
APPENDIX B REPORTS OF THE OPERATIONS OF THE FIRST AERO SQUADRON SIGNAL CORPS WITH THE MEXICAN PUNITIVE EXPED...
APPENDIX C MOTOR TRANSPORT EXPERIENCES WITH THE MEXICAN PUNITIVE EXPEDITION
APPENDIX D ROSTER OF OFFICERS WHO SERVED WITH THE MEXICAN PUNITIVE EXPEDITION
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Über den Autor (2017)

Colonel Frank Tompkins was born in 1868. Instead of going to West Point like his father and grandfather before him, Tompkins entered the army directly in 1891. He graduated from the Infantry and Cavalry School at Fort Leavenworth in 1897 and became a captain in 1901. For the next nine years, he commanded expeditions in the Philippines, Mt. Banahao, and New Mexico, until he was detailed as Professor of Military Science and Tactics at Norwich University, Vermont. Tompkins retired after 30 years of service, having revolutionized and upheld the standards of cavalry and military service.

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