The Cambridge History of American Literature: Volume 8, Poetry and Criticism, 1940-1995

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Sacvan Bercovitch, Cyrus R. K. Patell
Cambridge University Press, 1994 - 545 Seiten
IVolume 8, concerned with works of poetry and criticism written between 1940 and the present, brings together two different sets of materials and narrative forms: the aesthetic and the institutional. Discarding the traditional synoptic overview of major figures, von Hallberg, Graff, and Carton settle in favor of a history from the inside--a history of interstices and relations, equal to the task of considering the contexts of art, power, and criticism in which it is set.

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Nutzerbericht  - smichaelwilson - LibraryThing

This first volume of the Cambridge History of American Literature (Colonial and Revolutionary Literature, Early National Literature: Part I) covers American literature from it's inception with the ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

Acknowledgments page vii
1
Introduction II
11
Politics
23
Rear Guards
56
AvantGardes
83
Authenticity
123
Translation
160
Introduction
263
The Nationalizing of the New Criticism
305
The Canon the Academy and Gender
324
Deconstruction and Poststructuralism
354
From Textuality to Materiality
389
Cultural and Historical Studies
415
Chronology 19401995
473
Bibliography
523
Index
535

The Emergence of Academic Criticism
281

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Über den Autor (1994)

Sacvan Bercovitch, who is a professor at Harvard University, is probably the most influential critic in American studies today. Tracing the function of rhetoric in American writing from the Puritans through the nineteenth century, Bercovitch has argued that the persuasiveness of rhetoric is in proportion to its capacity to help people act in history. In his books, Bercovitch has revealed the power of American rhetoric as it creates a myth of America that conflates religious and political issues, transforming even the most despairing and critical energies into affirmations of the American way. Among his major arguments is the idea that the rhetoric of America's colonial sermons and histories, founding documents, such as the Declaration of Independence, and novels of the American Renaissance, all participate in the project of transforming what he calls dissensus into rituals of consensus.

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