Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 01.06.2011 - 240 Seiten
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In this witty, often terrifying work of cultural criticism, the author of Amusing Ourselves to Death chronicles our transformation into a Technopoly: a society that no longer merely uses technology as a support system but instead is shaped by it--with radical consequences for the meanings of politics, art, education, intelligence, and truth.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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Nutzerbericht  - kittyjay - LibraryThing

We all recognize the changing world around us: our phones are computers, our computers are televisions, and our bookshelves are now condensed to a single Kindle reader. Books upon books have been ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

TECHNOPOLY

Nutzerbericht  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Postman (Conscientious Objections, 1988, etc.) once more cuts across the grain as an important critic of our national culture, this time arguing that America has become the world's first ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

From Tools to Technocracy
From Technocracy to Technopoly
The Improbable World
The Broken Defenses
Medical Technology
Computer Technology
Invisible Technologies
Scientism
The Great Symbol Drain
The Loving Resistance Fighter
Notes
Bibliography
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2011)

Neil Postman was University Professor, Paulette Goddard Chair of Media Ecology, and Chair of the Department of Culture and Communication at New York University. Among his twenty books are studies of childhood (The Disappearance of Childhood), public discourse (Amusing Ourselves to Death), education (Teaching as a Subversive Activity and The End of Education), and the impact of technology (Technopoly). His interest in education was long-standing, beginning with his experience as an elementary and secondary school teacher. He died in 2003.

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