Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

That each fair scene which strikes her

eye, May charm with sweet variety.

[ocr errors]

30

Ye streams, that, in perpetual flow,

Still warble on your mazy way, , Murmur EUANTHE, as you go ; Murmur a love-fick Poet's woe:

Ye feather'd warblers join the lay; Şing how I suffer, how complain ; Yet name not him who feels the pain.

35

VI.
And thou, eternal ruling Pow'r !

If spotless virtue claims thy care,
Around unheard of blessings show'r ;
Let some new pleasure crown each hour,

And make her blest, as good and fair : Of all thy works, to mortals known, The best and faireft she alone.

40

[blocks in formation]

To a Young GENTLEMAN bound for

Guinea :

An ODE.

I.

A

TTEND the muse, whose numbers flow

Faithful to sacred friendship’s woe ;
And let the Scotian lyre
Obtain thy pity and thy care:
While thy lov'd walks, and native air,

5 The folemin sounds inspire.

II.

[ocr errors]

That native air, these walks, no more
Blest with their fav’rite, now deplore,

And join the plaintive strain:
While, urg'd by winds and waves, he flies,
Where unknown stars, thro' unknown skies,

Their trackless course maintain.

III.

15

Yet think: by ev'ry keener smart,
That thrills a friend or brother's heart;

By all the griefs that rise,
And with dumb anguish heave thy breast,
When absence robs thy foul of rest,
And swells with tears the

eyes :

IV

[ocr errors]

By all our sorrows ever new,
Think whom you fly, and what pursue s

And judge by your's our pain ;
From friendship’s dear tenacious arms,
You fly, perhaps, to war’s alarms,

To angry skies and main.

25

The smiling plain, the solemn shade,
With all the various charms display'd,

That summer's face adorn;
Summer, with all that's gay or sweet,
With transport longs thy sense to meet,

And courts thy dear return.

30

VI.

VI.

The gentle sun, the fanning gale,
The vocal wood, the fragrant vale,

Thy presence all implore :
Can then a waste of sea and sky,
That knows no limits, charm thine eye,

Thine ear the tempeft's roar ?

35

VII.

But why such weak attractions name,
While ev'ry warmer social claim

Demands the mournful lay?
Ah! hear a brother's moving sighs,
Thro' tears, behold a sister's eyes
Emit a faded

ray.

40

VIII.
Thy young allies, by nature taught,
To feel the tender pang of thought,

Which friends in absence claim ;
To thee, with forrow all-fincere,
Oft
pay

the tributary tear,
Oft lisp with joy thy name.

45

IX.

[ocr errors]

50

Nor these thy absence mourn alone,
O dearly lov'd! tho' faintly known

One yet unsung remains :
Nature, when scarce fair light he knew,
Snatch'd heav'n, earth, beauty, from his view,

And darkness round him reigns.

[ocr errors]

55

The muse with pity view'd his doom ;
And, darting thro' th' eternal gloom

An intellectual ray,
Bad him with music's voice inspire
The plaintive Aute, the sprightly lyre,

And tune th' impassion'd lay.

60

XI.

Thus, tho' despairing of relief,
With ev'ry mark of heart-felt grief,

The absence we complain :
While now, perhaps, th' auspicious galę
Invites to spread the flying fail,

And all our tears are vain.

65

[blocks in formation]
« ZurückWeiter »