Ten Minutes Advice in Choosing Cigars: With a Word Or Two on Tobacco, and Something about Snuff. Exposing Many Popular Errors, and Detailing All the Secrets of the Trade, Etc

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J. Meaden, 1833 - 36 Seiten
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Seite 30 - ... and there is something so exceedingly congenial in the properties of both, that nature seems to have intended them for inseparable associates. We do not know how to use tobacco in this country, but defile and deteriorate it with malt liquor. When used with coffee, and after the Turkish fashion, it is singularly grateful to the taste, and refreshing to the spirits; counteracting the effects of fatigue and cold, and appeasing the cravings of hunger, as I have often experienced.
Seite 1 - Only thus much; by Hercules, I do hold it, and will affirm it before any prince in Europe, to be the most sovereign and precious weed that ever the earth tendered to the use of man.
Seite 14 - With this machine they spin the leaves after they are cured, into a twist of any size they think fit ; and having folded it into rolls of about twenty pounds each, they lay it by for use. In this state it will keep for several years, and be continually improving, as it always grows milder. The Illinois usually form it into car.
Seite 14 - In this state it will keep for several years, and be continually improving, as it always grows milder. The Illinois usually form it into carrots ; which is done by laying a number of leaves, when cured, on each other after the ribs have been taken out, and rolling them round with packthread, till they become cemented together. These rolls commonly measure about 1 8 or 20 inches in length, and nine round in the middle part.
Seite 30 - I have often experienced. Hearne, I think, in his journey to the mouth of the Coppermine River, mentions his experience of similar effects of tobacco. He had been frequently wandering without food for five or six days, in the most inclement weather, and supported it all, he says, in good health and spirits, by smoking tobacco and wetting his mouth with a little snow. Had he taken with him a little coffee, the effect would have been still more decided.
Seite 2 - In the countries of which it is a native, it is considered by the Indians as the most valuable offering that can be made to the beings they worship. They use it in all their civil and religious ceremonies.
Seite 10 - Tobacco, divine, rare, superexcellent tobacco, which goes far beyond all the panaceas, potable gold, and philosopher's stones, a sovereign remedy to all diseases. A good vomit, I confess, a virtuous herb, if it be well qualified, opportunely taken, and medicinally used ; but as it is commonly abused by most men, which take it as tinkers do ale, 'tis a plague, a mischief, a violent purger of goods, lands, health; hellish, devilish and damned tobacco, the ruin and overthrow of body and soul.
Seite 7 - It then came under the patronage of the Cardinal Santa Croce, the Pope's nuncio, who, returning from his embassy at the Spanish and Portuguese courts, carried the plant to his own country, and thus acquired a fame little inferior to that which, at another period, he had won by piously bringing a portion of the real cross from the Holy Land. It was received with general enthusiasm in the Papal States, and hardly less favourably in England, into which it was introduced by Sir Walter Raleigh, in 1585.
Seite 10 - VIII. anathematised all snuff-takers, who committed the heinous sin of taking a pinch in any church: and so late as 1690, Innocent XII. excommunicated all who indulged in the same vice in Saint Peter's church, at Rome. In 1625, Amurath IV. prohibited smoking, as an unnatural and irreligious custom, under pain of death : few, indeed, suffered the penalty, yet, in Constantinople, where the custom is now universal, smoking was thought to be so ridiculous and hurtful, that any Turk, who was caught in...
Seite 32 - Joss-stick, is a stick of pastile, used as incense in their temples, and burnt in metal tripods before the great Joss, or God — hence the name. These lights are kept burning night and day. At sunset a bunch of these joss-sticks is lighted at the door of every house in Canton, to protect the inmates from the visits of evil spirits. The boats Jiave also a propitiatory spark placed in their bows.

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