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CHAPTER III.

INHERENT SOURCES OF HIS SUCCESS.

INHERENT sources of success in life.--Poverty, the chief

impulse of activity in material and intellectual attain-

ments.—Melancholy history associated with literary life.

-Allegory of Consuelo.-Harris's poverty. His earliest

avocation an incentive to his activity.—Conception of

education and learning among the illiterate Natives.-

Merivale's conclusion from Roman history.–Faults in

the character of Young India.--How removed ?-Hasty

notions of his conduct.-Two great classes of Young

India how distanced ?-A representative of the worst

class.--His career and life allegorically described.--His

dejection in after-life.--His want of perfect self-re-

liance.—Harris prominently apart from his educated

countrymen in the possession of confidence of opinion.-

Cogency of feeling required to impel all internal decisions

into action.--Courage required to withstand the attacks

of ridicule and contempt from others.--Disraeli's bold

CHAPTER V.

EXTERNAL CIRCUMSTANCES BEARING ON SUCCESS IN LIFE, AND

THOSE WHICH OPERATED ON HARRIS.

EXTERNAL influences from early Teachers.—The Mis-

sionary best adapted to be the Teacher of Youth.—Why,

however, he is disliked in India.-His undue zeal in

the propagation of his Religion.-Mr. Gaster quoted.

1.--- IIarris prominently distinct in his

traits of character.--His pursuit of knowledge as an end,

not as a means.--

.--His remarkable zeal after learning.--

His manner of spending leisure.—A remarkable scene in

the mock Bengalee Temple.-Who achieves success ?.. 126

CHAPTER VII.

IN WHAT RESPECTS WAS HARRIS A GREAT MAN ?

A PERNICIOUS conception of greatness.-Genius and

talents over-estimated by the world. -- Another class of

CHAPTER IX.

THE LONGEST, BUT THE MOST IMPORTANT CHAPTER IN THE

BOOK : REGENERATION OF INDIA.

Two theories for the amelioration of the people.-Which

preferred.--Danger from the present hopeless condition

of the people.--The Empires of the World.--Of the

Cæsars, Baber, and Napoleon.--Uniqueness of British

domination.--The present time pre-eminently fitted for

undertaking the task of Popular Education in India.--

Review of the History of Indian Education.--Its three

epochs.--Government System of Education faulty.--Dis-

tinction between general and special education.—Every

man, however low and grovelling, receives all life long

some education or other.--In India there is in one sense

no general education.--Percentage of boys that finish a

complete course of general instruction.-A mournful

question.—Necessity of rendering Colleges self-support-

ing.–Grounds for viewing the measure as easy of accom-

plishment.-Percentage of boys receiving elementary

education.--The state of this education.-Number of

Schools in the Bombay Presidency.--Statistics of Popu-

lation in the different divisions of British India.--The

educational requirements of each calculated in compari-

son with some of the States of Europe.— With reference

to Primary Schools.--With reference to Teachers.-

Unfitness of the present Staff even in the highest English

Seminary.—The number of Normal Colleges and of In-

spectors required.--The people too poor to join the

Schools.---Their popular notions on Englishmen's leaving

India for their Mother Country.--Great misapprehension

among Englishmen with reference to the wants of the

people. Advocacy of the German method of popular in-

struction.—Striking resemblance in the state of Germany

and of India.--Our present system of education not

essentially differing from the German, though so popu-

larly taken.-Mere Schools and School Training ineffec-

tual to work any change among the people.—The French

Colportage described.—Establishment of a Committee

for the diffusion of knowledge advocated. The present

state of Prose and Poetry in the Vernacular.— The es-

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