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First Ariel perch'd upon a Matadore,
Then each according to the rank they bore;
For Sylphs, yet mindful of their ancient race, 35
Are, as when women, wondrous fond of place.

Behold, four Kings in majesty rever'd,
With hoary whiskers and a forky beard ;
And four fair Queens, whose hands sustain a flower,
Th'expressive emblem of their softer power ;
Four Knaves in garbs succinct, a trusty band;
Caps on their heads, and halberts in their hand;
And party-colour'd troops, a fining train,
Drawn forth to combat on the velvet plain.

The skilful Nymph reviews her force with care : Let Spades be trumps! she said, and trumps they were.

Now move to war her sable Matadores, In show like leaders of the swarthy Moors. Spadillio first, unconquerable Lord ! Led off two captive trumps, and swept the board. 50 As many more Manillio forc'd to yield, And march'd a victor from the verdant field. Him Basto follow'd, but his fate more hard Gain'd but one trump, and one Plebeian card. With his broad sabre next, a chief in years, 55 The hoary Majesty of Spades appears, Puts forth one manly leg, to fight reveald,

The rest, his many-colour'd robe conceal'd. The rebel Knave, who dares his prince engage, Proves the just victim of his royal rage.

60 Ev’n mighty Pam, that Kings and Queens o‘erthrew, And mow'd down armies in the fights of Lu,

Sad

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Sad chance of war! now deftitute of aid,
Falls undistinguish 'd' by the victor Spade!
; Thus far both armies to Belinda yield;
Now to the Baron fate inclines the field.
His warlike Amazon her host invades,
Th' imperial confort of the crown of Spades.
The Club's black tyrant first her victim dy'd,
Spite of his haughty mien, and barbarous pride : 70
What boots the regal circle on his head,
His giant limbs in state unwieldy spread;
That long behind he trails his pompous robe,
And, of all monarchs, only grasps the globe ?

The Baron now his Diamonds pours apace;
Th' embroider'd King who shews but half his face,
And his refulgent Queen, with powers combin’d,
Of broken troops an easy conquest find.
Clubs, Diamonds, Hearts, in wild disorder feen,
With throngs promiscuous Arow the level green. 80
Thus when dispersd a routed army runs,
Of Asia's troops, and Afric's fable fons,
With like confusion different nations fly,
Of various habit, and of various dye,
The pierc’d battalions difunited fall,
In heaps on heaps; one fate o'erwhelms them all.

The Knave of Diamonds tries his wily arts, And wins (oh shameful chance!) the Queen of Hearts. At this, the blood the virgin's cheek forfook, A livid paleness spreads o'er all her look;

90 She sees, and trembles at th' approaching ill, Just in the jaws of ruin, and Codille,

And

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And now (as oft in some distemper'd state), :
On one nice trick depends the general fate,
An Ace of Hearts steps forth : the King unseen 95
Lurk'd in her hand, and mourn'd his captive Queen :)
He springs to vengeance with an eager pace,
And falls like thunder on the proftrate. Ace.
The Nymph exulting fills with shouts the sky;
The walls, the woods, and long canals reply.

O thoughtless mortals! ever blind to fate,
Too soon dejected, and too soon elate:
Sudden, these honours shall be snatch'd away,
And curs’d for ever this victorious day,

For lo! the board with cups and spoons is crown'd,
The berries crackle, and the mill turns round:
On shining Altars of Japan they raise
The silver lamp; the fiery spirits blaze :
From filver {pouts the grateful liquors glide,
While China's earth receives the smoaking tide :
At once they gratify their scent and taste,
And frequent cups prolong the rich repast.
Strait hover round the Fair her airy band;
Some, as the fipp’d, the fuming liquor fann'd,
Some o'er her lap their careful plumes display'd, IIS
Trembling, and conscious of the rich brocade.
Coffee (which makes the politician wife,
And see through all things with his half-shut eyes)

Sent

II

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VARIATION. Ver. 105. Sudden the board, &c.] From hence the first edition continues to ver, 134.%.

What Time would spare, from Steel receives its date, And monuments, like

men,

submit to fate! Steel could the labour of the Gods destroy, And strike to dust th' imperial towers of Troy; Steel could the works of mortal pride confound, And hew triumphal arches to the ground. What wonder then, fair Nymph! thy hairs should feel The conquering force of unresisted steel ?

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BUT

CANTO IV.
UT anxious cares the pensive Nymph oppress’d,

And secret passions labour'd in her breast.
Not youthful kings battle seiz'd alive,
Not scornful virgins who their charms survive,
Not ardent lovers robb’d of all their bliss,

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Not ancient ladies when refus'd a kiss,
Not tyrants fierce that unrepenting die,
Not Cynthia when her manteau's pinn'd awry,
E'er felt such rage, resentment, and despair,
As thou, sad Virgin! for thy ravishd Hair.

For, that fad moment, when the Sylphs withdrew, And Ariel weeping from Belinda flew,

Umbriel,

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VARIATION.

Ver. 11. For, that fad moment, &c.] All the lines from hence to the 94th verse, describe the house of Spleen, and are not in the first edition ; instead of them followed only these ::

While her rack'd Soul repose and peace requires,

The fierce Thalestris fans the rising fires. and continued at the 94th verse of this Canto.

As on the rolegay in her breat reclind,
He watch'd th' ideas ribeg in her sid,
Sudden be view'd, is fpite of all bat,
An earthly lover lurking at her heart.
Amaz'd, confus’d, he found his power erri, I5
Resign d to fate, and with a high rat'd.

The Peer now spreads the guttering forts wide
T'inclose the Lock; now joins it, to-ávrde.
Ev’n then, before the fatal engine closd,
A wretched Sylph too fondly interpos'd;

150 Fate arg d the sheers, and cut the Sylph ia twain (But airy substance foon unites again), The meeting points the facred hair diffever From the fair head, for ever, and for ever!

Then flash'd the living lightning from her eyes, 155
And screams of horror rend th’ affrighted kies.
Not louder Ihrieks to pitying heaven are caft,
When husbands, or when lap-dogs, breathe their lei!
Or when rich China vessels fall’n from high,
In glittering duft and painted fragments die!

Let wreaths of triumph now my temples swine
(The Vietor cry'd), the glorious Prize is mire!
While fish in streams, or birds delight in air,
Or in a coach and fix the British Fair,
As long as Atalantis shall be read,

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Or the small pillow grace a Lady's bed,
While visits shall be paid on solemn days,
When numerous wax-lights in bright order blaze,
While nymphs take treats, or affignations give,
So long my honour, name, and praise, shall live! 179

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