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CHAPTER XII.

THE PLAGUE AND KINDRED EVILS.

Page.

Removal to the Princes’ Islands--Singular precaution against

the plague-Number of its victims-History-Symptoms-

Remedies-Great terror caused by the disease--Different

theories respecting contagion—Preventives—Duty of the phi-

lanthropist-Filth of the Levant-Vermin-Dogs—Proposed

plan for their destruction—Two modes of self-preservation

-Fires.

93

CHAPTER XIII.

CHAP

MISCELLANEOUS NOTICES.

Turkish currency--Weights and measures—Summer's

employment—-Hopeful Armenian youth-Turkish women

and RayahsSlight illness—Fruits and provisions.

112

CHAPTER XIV.

RESIDENCE AT THE PRINCES' ISLANDS.

Situation-Desolate islets-Mineral and vegetable produc-

tions—A widowed family-Permanent and occasional resi-

dents—Intercourse with the city-Monasteries—Their sec-

ular character—Property--Ecclesiastical prison—Supersti-

tious resort of the sick-Brutal conduct of an Hegumenos-

A benevolent monk-Churches—Agiasmas-Priests.

123

CHAPTER XV.

RESIDENCE AT THE PRINCES' ISLANDS.

Government of the islands—Arrival of a Turkish regiment

-Uneasiness of the inhabitants--Good conduct of the soldiers

Schools in Prinkipos—Efforts for the instruction of youth-

Distribution of Greek tracts—Eagerness of the people to ob-

tain them-Publicity of distribution-Results.

134

CHAPTER XVI.

RESIDENCE AT THE PRINCES' ISLANDS.

Accidental introduction to medical practice-Prevalence

of disease-Affecting instance of superstition-Unfeeling phy-

sician-Importunity of friends--Vaccination-Advantages and

disadvantages of uniting the medical with the missionary

character-Hermits and ascetics-State of Morals-Conclu-

ding remarks.

142

CHAPTER I.

VOYAGE ACROSS THE ATLANTIC.

Departure from Boston—The Gulf-Stream-A storm-The Wes

tern Islands—African Coast–Lesser incidents of the voyageSea Stores Condition of Seamen-Arrival at Gibraltar.

. At sea, n. L. 40° 51'. w. L. 35o.)

October 4, 1826. MY DEAR E.

The Atlantic I have expected to find like Israel's “ waste howling wilderness,” spread out as a trial of patience, before entering the promised land. Short be our passage, is the prayer of the voyager, and shorter still you may add, be the story of it. Yet since you have requested to share in the benefits of my pilgrimage, think not to stand with me on Mount Zion, without first learning something of the inconveniencies and trials encountered by the way.

I wrote you from Boston, Saturday Sept. 16, that we (Rev. Elnathan Gridley and myself,) were already embarked for Gibraltar, in the brig Glide, Capt. Richardson. We hoped to have unmoored during the night, but the Sabbath sun rose upon us while we still lay at anchor. The owner came on board to give his final instructions; and I had opportunity of exchanging a farewell gaze with the friend, who, so much in the spirit of that hastening era, has sung “ the Age of Benevolence,”* The church-going bell, sent also its soften

* Rev. Carlos Wilcox. It was not until my return to America, that I learned the loss which sacred poesy and the cause of his great argument, had sustained in his death.

Vol. I.

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