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By the hand he took me raised,

She might give passage to her thoughts, and so as And over fields and waters, as in air,

it were utter out some smoke of those flames, whereSmooth-sliding without step.

Milton. with else she was not only burned but smothered. Smouth Adonis from his rock

Sidney. Ran purple to the sea.

Id. Lewd and wicked custom, beginning perhaps at the In their motions harmony divine first amongst few, afterwards spreading into greater So smooths her charming tones.

N. multitudes, and so continuing, from time may be of As French has more fineness and smoothness at this force, even in plain things, to smother the light of time, so it had more compass, spirit, and force in natural understanding.

Hooker. Montaigne's age.

Temple.

We smothered The outlines must be smooth, imperceptible to the The most replenished sweet work of nature, touch, and even without eminences or cavities. That from the prime creation e'er she framed. Dryden.

Shakspeare. Nor box nor limes, without their use ;

Thus must I from the smoke into the smother, Smooth-grained, and proper for the turner's trade, From tyrant duke into a tyrant brother.

Id. Which curious hands may carve, and steel with ease This unfortunate prince, after a long smother of invade.

Id.

discontent, and hatred of many of his nobility and Smiling she seemed, and full of pleasing thought; people, breaking forth at times into seditions, was at From ocean as she first began to rise,

last distressed by them.

Bacon. And smoothed the ruffled scas, and cleared the skies. Nothing makes a man suspect much, more than to

Id. know little ; and therefore men should procure to Restored it soon will be ; the means prepared, know more, and not to keep their suspicions in The difficulty smoothed, the danger shared :

smother.

Id. Essays. Be but yourself.

Ich Hay and straw have a very low degree of heat; The nymph is all into a laurel gone,

but yet close and smothering, and which drieth not. The smoothness of her skin remains alone. Id.

ld. Natural History. Virgil, though smooth, where smoothness is required,

She was warmed with the graceful appearance of is so far from affecting it, that he rather disdains it the hero : she smothered those sparkles out of decency frequently using synaleznas, and concluding his but conversation blew them up into a fame. sense in the middle of his verse.

Id.

Dryden's Æneid, Dedication, A countryman feeding his flock by the seaside, it Where yon disordered heap of ruin lies, was so delicate a fine day, that the smoothness of the Stones rent from stones, where clouds of dust arise water tempted him to set up for a merchant.

Amid that smother Neptune holds his place.
L'Estrange.

Id. Æneid. It brings up again into the mouth that which it The helpless traveller, with wild surprise, had swallowed, and, chewing it, grinds and smooths

Sees the dry desart all around him rise, it, and afterwards swallows it into another stomach. And smothered in the dusty whirlwind dies. Ray on the Creation.

Addison's Cato. With edged grooving tools they cut down and The greater part enter only like mutes to fill the smoothen the extuberances left.

stage, and spend their taper in smoke and smother. Moron's Mechanical Exercises,

Collier on Fame. Fallacious drink! ye honest men, beware,

SMOUL'DERING,. A participle; but I Nor trust its smoothness; the third circling glass SMOUL'DRY.

I know not whether the Suffices virtue.

Philips.

verb smoulder be in use, says Dr. Johnson. We So, Dick adept, tuck back thy hair ;

seem to recollect having seen it frequently in And I will pour into thy ear Remarks which none did e'er disclose

modern authors. Sax. smogan, to smother; In smooth-paced verse or hobbling prose.

Prior. Belg. smoel, hot. Burning and smoking without

vent. When sage Minerva rose, From her sweet lips smooth elocution flows. Gay.

None can breathe, nor see, nor hear at will, He was smooth-tongued, gave good words, and Through smouldry cloud of duskish stinking smoke, seldom lost his temper.

That the only breath him daunts who hath escaped Arbuthnot. History of John Bull.

the stroke.

Fuerie Queene. The madding monarchs to compose,

In some close pent room it crept along,
The Pylian prince, ihe smooth-speeched Nestor, rose.

And, smouldering as it went, in silence fed ;
Tickel.

Till the infant monster, with devouring strong, He for the promised journey bids prepare

Walked boldly upright with exalted head. Dryden. The smooth-haired horses and the rapid car. Pope. SMUG, adj. Belg. smucken, to dress. Nice;

Now on the wings of winds our course we keep; spruce; dressed with affectation of niceness. The God hath smoothed the waters of the deep.

Id. Odyssey.

There I have a bankrupt for a prodigal, who dares All your muse's softer art display;

scarce shew his head on the Rialto; a beggar, that Let Carolina smooth the tuneful lay;

used to come so smug upon the mart. Lull with Amelia's liquid name the Nine,

Shakspeare. Merchant of Venice.

My men, And sweetly flow through all the royal line. Pope.

In Circe's house, were all, in severall baine The musick of that murmuring spring

Studiously sweetened, smuged with oile, and decked Is not so mournful as the strains you sing ; With in and out weeds.

Chapman. Nor rivers winding through the vales below

He who can make your visage less horrid, and So sweetly warble, or so smoothly Aow. Id.

your person more smug, is worthy some good recepSMOTH'ER, v.a., v. n. & n. s. Sax. smoran; tion.

Spectator. Belg. smooren. To suffocate with smoke, or by

Lilies and roses will quickly appear, exclusion of the air; suppress: to smoke without

And her face will look wonderous smugly. Gay. vent; be suppressed : a smoke; thick dust; state SMUGʻGLE, v. a. l Belg. smockelen. To of suppression.

SMUGGLER, N. S. I import or export goods

without paying the customs. See below. The and sometimes to gain a bounty or a drawback. smuggler is the nefarious actor in these exploits. Our exports, in consequence of these different

SMUGGLING. The duties of customs were frauds, appear upon the custom-house books originally instituted in order to enable the king to greatly to overbalance our imports; to the unafford protection to trade against pirates ; they speakable comfort of those politicians who meahave since been continued as a branch of the sure the national prosperity by what they call public revenue. As duties imposed upon the the balance of trade. importation of goods necessarily raise their price The smuggling bill of 1826 contains the prinabove what they might otherwise have been sold cipal provisions now in force in Great Britain for, a temptation is presented to import the com- and its dependencies. modity clandestinely and to evade the duty. Many persons, prompted by the hopes of gain,

OF SMUGGLING GENERALLY, and considering the violation of a positive law of From and after the 5th of January, 1826, this this nature as in no respect criminal (an idea in act, and all the provisions therein contained, which they have been encouraged by a great shall have effect and come into and be and conpart of the community, who make no scruple to tinue in full force and operation, for the prevenpurchase smuggled goods), have engaged in this tion of smuggling, and shall extend to any law illicit trade. It was impossible that government in force, or hereafter to be made, relating to the could permit this practice, which is highly inju. revenue or management of the customs. rious to the fair trader, as the smuggler is en If any vessel or boat belonging in the whole or in abled to undersell him, while at the same time part to his majesty's subjects, or whereof one-half he impairs the national revenue, and thus evades of the persons on board or discovered to have the end for which these duties were appointed. been on board the vessel or boat be subjects of Such penalties are therefore inflicted as it was his majesty, be found within four leagues of the thought would prevent smuggling. Many laws coast of that part of the united kingdom which have been made with this view. When we con is between the North Foreland on the coast of sider the nature, and still more the history, of Kent and Beachy Head on the coast of Sussex, mankind, we must allow that the enacting of or within eight leagues of the coast of any other severe laws is not always the way to prevent part of the united kingdom, or shall be discovercrimes. It were indeed much to be wished that ed to have been within the said distances, not there were no such thing as a political crime; for proceeding on her voyage, wind and weather the generality of men, but especially the lower permitting, having on board or in any manner orders, not discerning the propriety or utility of attached or affixed thereto, or having had on such laws, consider them as oppressive and ty- board or in any manner attached or affixed thererannical, and never hesitate to violate them when to, or conveying or having conveyed in any they can do it with impunity. Instead therefore manner any goods whatsoever liable to forfeiture of punishing smugglers, it would be much better by this or any other act relating to the revenue to remove the temptation. But the high duties of customs upon being imported into the united which have been imposed upon the importation kingdom, then not only all such goods, together of many different sorts of foreign goods, to dis- with their packages, and all goods contained courage their consumption in Great Britain, have therein, but also the vessel or boat, together with in many cases served only to encourage smug- all her guns, furniture, ammunition, tackle, gling; and in all cases have reduced the revenue and apparel, shall be forfeited: provided that of the customs below what more moderate duties such distance of eight leagues shall be measured would have afforded. The saying of Swift, that in any direction between the southward and in the arithmetic of the customs two and two, eastward of Beachy Head; and the provisions instead of making four, make sometimes only of this act shall extend to such distance of eight one, holds perfectly true with regard to such leagues in every direction from Beachy Head, heavy duties, which never could have been im- although any part of such limits may exceed the posed, had not the mercantile system taught us, distance of four leagues from any part of the coast in many cases, to employ taxation as an instru- of Great Britain to the eastward of Beachy Head ment, not of revenue, but of monopoly. The aforesaid.- 2. bounties which are sometimes given upon the If any vessel or boat, not being square-rigged, exportation of home produce and manufactures, belonging in the whole or in part to his majesty's and the drawbacks which are paid upon the re- subjects, or whereof one-half of the persons on exportation of the greater part of foreign goods, board or discovered to have been on board the have given occasion to many frauds, and to a spe- vessel or boat be subjects of his majesty, be cies of smuggling more destructive of the public found in any part of the British or Irish chanrevenue than any other. To obtain the bounty or nels, or elsewhere on the high seas, within 100 drawback, the goods, it is well known, are some- leagues of any part of the coasts of the united times shipped and sent to sea, but soon after- kingdom, or be discovered to have been within wards clandestinely relanded in some other part the said limits or distances, having on board or in of the country. Heavy duties being imposed any manner attached or affixed thereto, or having upon almost all goods imported, our merchant had on board or in any manner attached or affiximporters smuggle as much, and make entry of ed thereto, or conveying or having conveyed in as little as they can. Our merchant exporters, any manner, any brandy or other spirits in any on the contrary, make entry of more than they cask or package of less size or content than four export; sometimes out of vanity, and to pass gallons (excepting only for the use of the seamen for great dealers in goods which pay no duty; then belonging to and on board such vessel or

boat, not exceeding two gallons for each seaman,) furniture, ammunition, tackle, and apparel, and or any tea exceeding six pounds in the whole, all such goods laden therein, shall be forfeited. or any tobacco or snuff in any cask or package —$ 5. whatever, containing less than 450 lbs. or packed When any vessel or boat belonging in the separately in any manner within any such cask whole or in part to his majesty's subjects, or or package (except loose tobacco for the use of whereof one half of the persons on board are the seamen, not exceeding five pounds for each subjects of his majesty, shall be found within seaman), or any cordage or other article adapt- four or eight leagues of the coast of the L'nited ed and prepared for slinging small casks, or any Kingdom as aforesaid, or be found as aforesaid casks or other vessels whatsoever capable of con in the British or Irish channels, or elsewhere taining liquids, of less size or content than forty within 100 leagues of the coast of this king. gallons, of the sort or description used or interd- dom, and chase shall be given, or signal made ed to be used or fit or adapted for the smuggling by any vessel in his majesty's service or in the of spirits, or any materials for the forming, mak- service of the revenue, hoisting the proper pening, or constructing such casks or vessels, or any dant and ensign as hereinafter mentioned, in orsyphon, lube, hose, or implements whatsoever, der to bring such vessel, or boat to, if any perfor the broaching or drawing any fluid, or any son on board such vessel or boat shall, during articles or implements or materials adapted for the chase, or before such vessel or boat shall the repacking tobacco or snuff (unless the cord- bring to, throw overboard the cargo or any part age or other articles as aforesaid are really ne- of the same (unless through unavoidable necescessary for the use of the vessel or boat, or are a sity or for the preservation of such vessel or boat, part of the cargo of the vessel or boat, and in- the vessel or boat having a legal cargo on board), cluded in the regular official documents of the or shall stave or destroy any part of the cargo vessel or boat), in such case the spirits, tea, to to prevent seizure thereof, in such case the vessel bacco, or snuff, together with the casks or pack- or boat, with all her guns, furniture, ammunition, ages containing the same, and the cordage or tackle, and apparel, shall be forfeited.—$6. other articles, and also the vessel or boat, with If any vessel (not being square-rigged, nor a all her guns, furniture, ammunition, tackle, and galliott of not less than fifty tons burden) or any apparel therein, shall be forfeited.- $ 3. boat coming from Brest on the coast of France,

If any foreign vessel or boat (not being square- or from any place between Brest on the coast of rigged), in which there shall be one or more sub- France and Cape Finisterre on the coast of jects of his majesty, be found within four leagues Spain, including all islands on the coast of France of that part of the United Kingdom which is and Spain between those places, or coming from between the north Foreland on the coast of Kent any place between the Helder Point on the coast and Beachy Head on the coast of Sussex, or of Holland and North Bergen on the coast of within eight leagues of any other part of the Norway, or from any place as far up the Cattecoast of the United Kingdom, to be measured as gat as Gottenburgh, including all the islands on aforesaid, or shall be discovered to have been the coasts between those places, shall arrive in within the said distances, not proceeding on her any of the ports of the Uniied Kingdom, or shall voyage, wind and weather permitting, having on be found at anchor or hovering within the limits board or in any manner attached or affixed of any of the ports thereof, and not proceeding thereto, or having had on board or in any man on her voyage, wind and weather permitting, ner attached or affixed thereto, or conveying or having on board, for the use of the seamen then having conveyed in any manner, any brandy or belonging to and on board such vessel or boat, other spirits, in any cask or package of less size any spirits exceeding one half gallon for each or content than forty gallops (except only for the seaman, or having on board any tea, exceeding use of the seamen belonging to and on board such four pounds in the whole, or having on board vessel, not exceeding two gallons for each sea- any tobacco (excepting loose tobacco, not exman), or any tea, exceeding six pounds in the ceeding two pounds for each seaman), then not whole, or any tobacco or snuff in any cask or only all such goods, but also the vessel or boat, package whatsoever containing less than 450 lbs. with all her materials, shall be forfeited.—$ 7. or packed separately in any manner within such If any vessel (not being square-rigged, nor a cask or package (except loose tobacco for the galliott of not less than fifty tons burden), or any use of the seamen, not exceeding five pounds for boat coming from any place between Brest on each seaman on board such vessel), then such the coast of France and the Helder Point on the vessel or boat, with all her guns, furniture, am- coast of Holland, including the Texel Isle, and munition, tackle, and apparel, shall be forfeited. all places on the Zuyder Zee, and all islands on And if any foreign vessel whatsoever be found the coasts of France, the Netherlands, and Holwithin one league of the coast of the United land, between Brest and the Texel, shall arrive Kingdom, not proceeding on her voyage, wind in any of the ports of the United Kingdom, or and weather permitting, having on board or in be found at anchor or hovering within the limits any manner attached or affixed thereto, or hav- of any of the ports thereof, and not proceeding ing had on board or in any manner attached or on her voyage, wind and weather permitting, affixed thereto, or conveying or having convey- having on board, for the use of the seamen then ed in any manner, within such distance, any belonging to and on board such vessel or boat, goods whatsoever, liable to forfeiture by this or any spirits exceeding one-half gallon for each any other act relating to the revenue of customs, seaman, or having on board any tea exceeding upon being imported into the United Kingdom, two pounds in the whole, or having on board in such case the vessel, together with her guns, any tobacco, except loose tobacco, not exceed

ing one pound for each seaman, then not only shall and may be recovered with costs of suit, and all such goods, but also the vessel or boat, with it shall be lawful for any officer of his majesty's all her materials, shall be forfeited.-9.8. navy, customs, or excise, to enter on board any

Vessels within certain distances of Guernsey, such ship or boat, and to seize and take away any &c., having on board contraband goods, or sails such prohibited flag, jack, pendant, ensign, or ing thence with an improper number of men; colors, and the same shall thereupon become or taking on board implements for smuggling, or forfeited to his majesty's use.- 15. without a clearance, are to be forfeited.

Shipped prohibited goods, or those brought to If any vessel or boat whatever be found within quay. If any goods which are or may be prohithe limits of any port of the United Kingdom bited to be exported, be put on board any veswith a cargo on board, and such vessel shall af- sel or boat with intent to be laden or shipped for terwards be found light or in ballast, and the exportation, or shall be brought to any quay, master is unable to give a due account of the wharf, or other place in the United Kingdom, in place within the United Kingdom where such order to be put on board any vessel or boat, for vessel shall have legally discharged her cargo, the purpose of being exported; or if any goods, such vessel or boat, with her guns, furniture, am which are prohibited to be exported, be found in munition, tackle, and apparel, shall be forfeito any package produced to the officers of the cused.-- 13.

toms, as containing goods not so prohibited, then When vessels not bringing to during chase may not only all such prohibited goods, but also all be fired al.- In case any vessel or boat, liable to other goods packed therewith, shall be forfeited. seizure or examination under any act or law for $ 33. the prevention of smuggling, shall not bring to

Op SEIZURES. on being required so to do, on being chased by any vessel in his majesty's navy, having the All vessels and boats, and all goods whatsoever proper pendant ensign of his majesty's ships liable to forfeiture, under this or any other act hoisted, or by any vessel employed for the pre- relating to the revenue of customs, shall and may vention of smuggling under the authority of the be seized in any place either upon land or water, lords commissioners of the admiralty, or the by any officer of his majesty's army, navy, or macommissioners of customs, having a pendant and rines, duly authorised and on full pay, or officer of ensign hoisted, of such description as his ma customs or excise, or any person having authority jesty, by any order in council, or by his royal to seize from the commissioners of customs or proclamation under the great seal of the United excise; and all vessels, boats, and goods so seized Kingdom, shall have directed, or shall from time shall, as soon as conveniently may be, be deto time in that behalf direct, it shall be lawful for livered into the care of the proper officer apthe captain, master, or other person having the pointed to receive the same.-$34. And it shall command of such vessel in his majesty's navy, be lawful for any officer of the army, navy, or or employed as aforesaid (first causing a gun to marines, duly authorised and on full pay, or for be fired as a signal), to fire at or into such vessel any officer of customs, producing his warrant or or boat; and such captain, &c., is hereby in- deputation (if required) to go on board any vesdemnified and discharged from any indictment, sel which shall be within the limits of any of the penalty, or action for damages for so doing; and ports of this kingdom, and to rummage and tu in case any person be wounded, maimed, or search the cabin and all other parts of such veskilled by any such firing, and the captain, &c., sel for prohibited and uncustomed goods, and to be sued, molested, or prosecuted, or be brought remain on board such vessel during the whole before any of his majesty's justices of the peace time that the same shall continue within the or other justices, or persons having competent limits of such port; and also to search any perauthority, for such firing, wounding, maiming or son either on board, or who shall have landed killing, every sach justice, or person, is hereby from any vessel ; provided such officer shall have authorised and required, to admit every such good reason to suppose that such person hath captain &c., to bail.

any uncustomed or prohibited goods secreted Hoisting flags in imitation of those of the navy. about his person; and if any person obstruct, -If any person shall, from 5th July 1825, wear, oppose, or molest any such officer in going or carry, or hoist in or on board any ship or boat remaining on board, or in entering or searching whatever belonging to any of his majesty's sub- such vessel or person, every such person shall jects, whether the same be merchant or otherwise, forfeit £100.-- 36. without particular warrant for so doing from his Of searching persons. Before any person shall majesty or his high admiral of Great Britain, or be searched, by any such officer as aforesaid, it the commissioners for executing the office of high shall be lawful for such person to require such admiral of Great Britain, his majesty's jack com officer to take him or her before any justice of the monly called the union jack,or any pendant,ensign, peace, or before the collector, controller, or other or colors usually worn by his majesty's ships, or any superior officer of customs, who shall determine flag, jack, pendant, ensign, or colors, resembling whether there is reasonable ground to suppose those of his majesty, or those used on board his that such person has any uncustomed or prohimajesty's ships, or any other ensign or colors than bited goods about his or her person; and if it the ensign or colors by any proclamation of his appear to such justice, or superior officer of cusmajesty now in force or hereafter to be issued pre- toms, that there is reasonable ground to suppose scribed to be worn, in every such case the master that such person has any uncustomed or prohior the owners being on board the same, and every bibited goods about his or her person, then such other person so offending shall forfeit £50, which justice or officer shall direct such person to be

searched in such manner as he shall think fit; and deposited in the custom-house warehouse as but, if it appear to such justice or officer that aforesaid, to be proceeded against according to there is not reasonable ground to suppose that law; and in case any police officer, making desuch person has any uncustomed or prohibited tention of any such goods, neglect to convey the goods about his or her person, then such justice same to such warehouse, or to give the notice of or officer shall forthwith discharge such person, having stopped the same as before described, who shall not in such case be liable to be such officer shall forfeit £20.- 43. searched ; and every such officer is hereby autho Of harbouring prohibited or uncustomed goods.rised and required to take such person, upon de- Every person not arrested and detained, as heremand, before any such justice or officer, detaining inafter mentioned, who shall, either in the United him or her in the meantime : provided that no Kingdom or the Isle of Man, assist or be otherperson, being a female, so directed to be searched, wise concerned in the unshipping of any goods shall be searched by any other person than a fe- which are prohibited, or the duties for which male, duly authorised for that purpose by the have not been paid or secured, or who shall commissioners of customs.- 37.

knowingly harbour, keep, or conceal, or shall If any pussenger or other person on board any knowingly permit or suffer to be harboured, kept, vessel or boat shall, upon being questioned by or concealed, any goods which have been illeany officer of customs, whether he has any foreign gally unshipped without payment of duties, or goods upon his person, or in his possession, deny which have been illegally removed without paythe same, and any such goods shall, after suchment of the same, from any warehouse or place denial, be discovered upon his person, or in his of security in which they may have been origipossession, such goods shall be forfeited, and nally deposited, or shall knowingly harbour, keep, such person shall forfeit treble the value of such or conceal, or permit or suffer to be harboured, goods.- 39. And it shall be lawful for any kept, or concealed, any goods prohibited to be officer of customs, or person acting under the imported, or to be used or consumed in the direction of the commissioners of customs, autho- United Kingdom, or in the Isle of Man: and rised by writ of assistance under the seal of his every person, either in the United Kingdom or majesty's court of exchequer, to take a constable, the Isle of Man, to whose hands and possession headborough, or other public officer inhabiting any such uncustomed or prohibited goods shall near the place, and in the day time to enter into knowingly come, shall forfeit either the treble any house, shop, cellar, warehouse, room, or value thereof, or the penalty of £100, at the elecother place, and in case of resistance to break tion of the commissioners of his majesty's cusopen doors, chests, trunks, and other packages, toms.—$ 45. If any goods, upon which there is there to seize and thence to bring any uncustomed a drawback or bounty, be shipped to be exported or prohibited goods, and to put and secure the into parts beyond the seas, and afterwards be unsame in the custom-house warehouse in the port shipped with intention to be relanded in the next to the place whence such goods shall be United Kingdom (unless in case of distress, to so taken : provided that for the purposes of this save the goods from perishing), then the goods act any such constable, headborough, or other shall be forfeited, and the master of the vessel public officer duly sworn as such, may act as from which they shall be unshipped, and every well without the limits of any parish, ville, or person concerned in the unshipping, and the perother place for which he shall be so sworn, as son to whose hands the same shall knowingly within such limits.—$ 40. All writs of assist- come, or who shall knowingly harbour, keep, or ance so issued from the court of exchequer shall conceal, or suffer to be harboured, kept, or concontinue in force during the whole of the reign cealed, such goods, shall for every such offence in which such writs shall have been granted, and forfeit the treble value of the goods, or £100, at for six months from the conclusion of such reign. the election of the commissioners of customs.-$41.

§ 46. And every person who, by way of insuPolice officers seizing goods.- If any goods rance or otherwise, shall undertake or agree to īiable to forfeiture under this or any other act re- deliver any goods to be imported from beyond lating to the revenue of customs, be stopped or the seas, at any place in the United Kingdom, taken by any police officer, or other person acting without paying the duties due on such importaby virtue of any act of parliament, or otherwise tion, or any prohibited goods; or in pursuance of duly authorised, such goods shall be carried to such insurance, or otherwise, shall deliver or the custom-house warehouse next to the place cause to be delivered any uncustomed or prohiwhere the goods were stopped or taken, and there bited goods, every such person, and every aider delivered to the proper officer appointed to re or abettor thereof, shall for such offence forfeit ceive the same, within forty-eight hours after the £500, over and above any other penalty to which said goods were stopped and taken.—$ 42. If by law he may be liable; and every person who any such goods be stopped or taken by such po- shall agree to pay any money for the insurance lice-officer, on suspicion that the same have been or conveyance of such goods, or shall receive or feloniously stolen, it shall be lawful for the said take such goods into his custody or possession, officer to carry the same to the police-office to or suffer the same to be so received or taken, which the offender is taken, there to remain in shall also forfeit £500, over and above any order to be produced at the trial of the offender; penalty to which by law he may be liable on acand in such case the officer is required to give count of such goods.—$ 47. notice in writing to the commissioners of cus Every person, being a subject of his majesty, toms of his having so detained the goods, with who shall be found or discovered to have been the particulars of the same, and immediately on board any vessel or boat liable to forfeiture, after the trial all such goods are to be conveyed under this or any other act relating to the revenue

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