Rupert of the Rhine: The History of a Brave Prince

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Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1868 - 191 Seiten

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Seite 52 - O Lord, thou knowest how busy I must be this day. If I forget thee, do not thou forget me.
Seite 68 - I think there is none that take me for a coward, for sure I fear not the face of any man alive ; yet I shall repute it the greatest victory in the world to see his Majesty enter London in peace, without shedding one drop of blood...
Seite 179 - In this fatal wreck, — besides a great many brave gentlemen, and others, — the sea, to glut itself, swallowed the Prince Maurice, whose fame the mouth of detraction cannot blast, his very enemies bewailing his loss. Many had more power, few more merit : he was snatched from us in obscurity, lest, beholding his loss would have prevented some from endeavouring their own safety : — so much he lived beloved, and died bewailed.
Seite 191 - In respect to his private life, he was so just, so beneficent, so courteous, that his memory remained dear to all who knew him. " This," observes Campbell, " I say of my own knowledge; having often heard old people in Berkshire speak in raptures of prince Rupert.
Seite 138 - ... the King, having not five thousand men in their power. When this has been told him, and that many of his officers and soldiers go from him to them, if he have no more consideration of such as stay, I must extremely lament their condition, being exposed to all ruin and slavery.
Seite 138 - MY LORD, It is now in everybody's mouth, that the King is going for Scotland. I must confess it to be a strange resolution ; considering not only in what condition he will leave all behind him, but what probability there is for him to get thither. If I were desired to deliver my opinion what other ways the King should take, this should be my opinion, which your Lordship may declare to the King. His Majesty hath now no way left to preserve his posterity, kingdom, and nobility, but by a treaty. I believe...
Seite 121 - Cary's regiment. Sir — Nothing shall be neglected by me in which I may do you service. Ralph can tell you, that in the prosecution of it I was near a mischange on a rotten bridge near the Court, where we are ; and what we do I shall leave to honest Ensign Hemmerson's relation. This is the last act of the play. God grant that each man may do his part well.
Seite 123 - Rupert to speed to me. I desire to hear daily from you, and particularly when you will be with me, and which way you will march, and how strong you can come to Your loving Uncle, and most faithful friend, CHARLES R.
Seite 138 - King should take, this should be my opinion, which your Lordship may declare to the King. His Majesty hath now no way left to preserve his posterity, kingdom, and nobility, but by a treaty. I believe it a more prudent way to retain something, than to lose all.
Seite 153 - ... some musketeers at Worcester, and beat the enemy, and he came and got over and got to Woodstock. From Woodstock the Prince wrote to the King to know what he should do ; who sent him, by Colonel Legge, a paper to confess a fault, etc. Then the Prince sent a blank paper to the King by Colonel Legge, with his name subscribed, desiring His Majesty would set down what he should do, because he could not go with the Parliament's leave, nor stay with the King's.

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