Rules for the Preservation of Health: Being the Result of Many Years Practice

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J. Pridden - 139 Seiten
 

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Seite 22 - A poet, blest beyond the poet's fate, Whom Heaven kept sacred from the proud and great: Foe to loud praise, and friend to learned ease, Content with science in the vale of peace. Calmly he look'd on either life, and here Saw nothing to regret, or there to fear; From nature's temperate feast rose satisfied, Thank'd Heaven that he had lived, and that he died.
Seite 35 - ... water, by diluting the blood, renders the circulation easy and uniform. In the choleric, the coolness of the water restrains the quick motion and intense heat of the humours. It attenuates the glutinous viscidity of the juices of the phlegmatic, and the gross earthiness which prevails in melancholic temperaments.
Seite 83 - Make six middling pills of cobwebs. Take one a little before the cold fit : two a little before the next fit : the other three, if need be, a little before the third fit. I never knew this fail.
Seite 130 - Egg-fhells will become of a milder Tafte, and that Part, which is fufficiently calcined,. will fall into a Powder, of fuch a Finenefs as to pafs through' a common Sieve, which is to be done accordingly.
Seite 133 - Root, but do not know of any material Difference. . . This is my Manner of giving the Powder and Decoction. As to the Pills, their chief Ufe is in Fits of the Gravel, attended with Pain in the Back and Vomiting, and in Sup.
Seite 18 - If the mother cannot fuckle the child, get a wholefome chearful woman, with, a young milk, who has been ufed to tend young children. After the firft fix months, fmall broths and innocent foods of any kind, may do as well as living wholly upon milk. A principal thing to be always attended to, is, to give young children confiant exercite, and to keep them in a proper pofture.
Seite 81 - I beseech all persons who shall read this work not to degrade themselves to a level with the brutes, or the rabble, by gratifying their sloth, or by eating and drinking promiscuously whatever pleases their palates, or by indulging their appetites of every kind. But whether they understand physic or not, let them consult their reason, and observe what agrees, and what does not agree with them, that, like wise men, they may adhere to the use of such things as conduce to their health, and forbear...
Seite 132 - If the ftomach will not bear the decodlion, a fixth part of the ball made into pills muft be taken after every dofe of the powder. Where the perfon is aged, of a weak conftitution, or much reduced by lofs of appetite, or pain, the powder muft have a greater proportion of the calcined fnails than according to the foregoing direction ; and this proportion may be increafed fuitable to the nature of the cafe, till there be equal parts of the two ingredients.
Seite 16 - ... to have them often rubbed in the day with a warm hand or flannel, and in particular the inside of them. Rubbing a child all over takes off scurf, and makes the blood circulate.
Seite 132 - Snails than according to the foregoing Direction ; and this Proportion may be increafed fuitably to the Nature of the Cafe, till there be equal Parts of the two Ingredients. The Quantity alfo of both Powder and Decoction may be leflened for the fame Reafons. But as foon as the Perfon can bear it, he mould take them in the above-mentioned Proportions and Quantities.

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